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B1211 - Education Reform Bill Watch

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    Education Reform Bill, TSR Libertarian Party












    A Party Bill




    Education Reform Bill 2017

    Hon That’sGreat & Hon Saunders16

    Introduction of a Voucher System







    An Act to reform the education system and save taxpayer funds by putting teaching and school operation in the hands of parents and local communities, all whilst ensuring that the system is sufficiently funded and standards remain definitive and achievable.

    BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most excellent Majesty, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows: -

    1 - Definitions

    (1) ESA - Education Selection Assessment - A series of national and compulsory exams to be taken in the month of December in Year 6, replacing both the SATs students currently take during Year 6 and the 11-plus exams students currently taken to enter a Grammar School (renamed Selective Schools under this act). These will determine the type of school that children will go to in Year 7.

    (2) Privatisation - The process of donating schools to organisations whereby said organisations are left to the day-to-day running of the schools.

    (3) Organisations - For the purpose of this bill, this will refer to a single person or group of persons who will run the schools.

    (4) Newly Independent Schools (NIS) - The name given to the schools that are the primary subject of this bill. This is the name given to schools currently known as Public Schools, in which money will be given from parents through the Voucher System rather than directly from the state.

    (5) Selective Schools - A school that will determine its intake on how well students have performed in the ESA; reformed grammar schools.

    (6) Independent Schools - Schools run independently of state funding (currently known as Private Schools) that decide to not be included in the Voucher System.

    (7) Voucher System - The process in which money will be given directly to parent(s) rather than schools, based on their income.

    2 - Reform

    (1) Organisations may apply to the Department for Education for the right to assume ownership and control of a state school, thereby creating a NIS (or a Selective School in the case of Grammar Schools).

    a) Said applicants must present a comprehensive plan detailing their plans for the operation of their school, and the Secretary of State for Education has sole discretion over the approval and denial of applications.

    b) Said applicants must demonstrate commitment to adhere to government educational standards as they pertain to independent schools and the regulations issued herein.

    c) Said schools are required to adhere to Sections 1 and 6 of the Education (Independent School Standards) Regulations, but are exempted from the remaining sections of that code. Existing Independent Schools remain separate from this Act by default, but may choose to join the programme by applying according to the aforementioned procedure.

    d) The school and grounds of the school will be donated to the Organisation or individual which is deemed best suited to run the school.

    e) Said Organisations with experience in teaching will be favoured over those who lack experience. It will be ensured that those who currently run schools successfully will continue to do so.




    (2) There is established a Voucher System in order to ensure that each child has access to a quality education by subsidising educational-related expenses incurred by children from low-income backgrounds.

    a) The Government will maintain an electronic database called “Education Connect” which will serve as a mechanism for linking educational service providers and the government for the purpose of calculating and maintaining records of the amounts of education-related transactions.

    i) Immediately upon the purchase of any of the following services by a student who attends a school covered by this Act, a receipt must be sent electronically by the vendor to the government detailing the total price paid:

    1) Tuition fees.
    2) Other non-athletic, school-related fees
    3) School meals.
    4) Private tutoring & counseling services.
    5) School supplies & textbooks.

    i) On January 1st each year, the total of receipts incurred in the past calendar year are to be totaled and the amount used as the basis for the voucher to be awarded.

    ii) The Government will give any parent wishing to send their child to a NIS or Selective School a minimum of 50% of the annual school fees for their first child that will cover the services mentioned above, with the amount given depending on the income of the parent(s). Further children will receive funding for 100% of their annual school fees.

    iii) The Voucher System will still apply to schools that have not been privatised following the date of which this commences.

    b) Existing Independent (Primary) Schools will be allowed to have their own examinations, though they will not be taken in place of the ESA, only as well as.

    c) There shall be no locational requirements pertaining to which NIS School or Selective School a student may attend.




    (3) Organisations of individuals will receive £250 per pupil in the form of tax relief, providing an incentive for passionate people to apply to run the school. All funds given to the school, excluding tax relief, must be used by the end of each school cycle (September 1st to August 1st the next year), otherwise funds per pupil will be decreased to the amount they require. However, funds may be carried over to the next year if needed, but if not used in that next year - the funds will be decreased to the amount used in that year.




    (4) Selective Schools will cater for the highest achieving students in the ESA. They will receive no extra funding, but will be expected to attract the highest quality teachers setting them apart from non-Selective Schools.




    (5) Existing Independent Schools will still charge full fees from the parents, unless the school becomes an NIS or Selective School. If they do decide to become an NIS or a Selective School, they will adhere to the same rules of the other NIS or Selective Schools.

    (6) A maximum of 5 schools (Can be any combination of NIS Schools and Selective Schools) may be run per individual. If the schools are run by an Organisation, there must be at least one member of said Organisation per 5 schools being run.

    3 - Commencement, short title, extent and conditions

    (1) This Act shall come into force on 1st September 2018 - where we will aim to have introduced the reform to a total of 6,500 schools. We will then continue to reintroduce this reform at 6,500 schools a year until, and including, 2022. This will mean all schools that are currently built will have been reformed by 2022.

    (2) Any schools that will have been built and started running after the 1st of September 2018 will adhere to the reformed policies as soon as it starts the intake of pupils.

    (3) The ESA will take place at every state-run school in December 2017, replacing SATs and the 11-plus exams.

    (4) This Act may be cited as the School Independence Act 2017.

    (5) This Act extends to the United Kingdom for all state-run Primary Schools and Secondary Schools.
























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    4. Explanation and Costing

    Explanation

    Our past governments have been blindly wasting over £15 billion on our primary and secondary education systems, hence, the headline of this bill is the introduction of a Voucher System and a revolution in the way that funding is allocated to schools.

    Currently, £85.2 billion a year is invested into education, with the money going directly to schools. The results are embarrassing, and past governments have responded by simply throwing more money at the evident problem, hoping it will somehow go away. This is not the manner in which education should be treated, and therefore this bill will guarantee the saving of over £15 billion through our Voucher System, in which money is given directly to the parents, as opposed to the schools, through “Education Connect”.

    Our plans will see spending on education lowered by such a large amount because, with our approach, the inefficiencies of spending in state-run schools are removed. The Voucher System will result in schools being given around £8,000 a year per student at Secondary Schools, and around £5,000 a year per student at Primary Schools, on average, with parent(s) paying a small amount towards this fee depending on their income. This bill ensures that all parents who wish to send their child to a NIS or Selective School will pay no more than 50% of annual school fees for their first child, and that any further children will be fully funded by their Voucher.

    This will mean schools will receive much more per student, an average increase of £2,083 from the current national average of £4,306. The reason this bill will save such a great amount of money is because firstly, money will need to be spent in a much more responsible and efficient way, and secondly, the government will be handing the day to day running of the schools to regulated and experienced people or organisations in order to do so. These organisations will be made up of rigorously selected, experienced and caring men and women, who will be required to have over 10 years of teaching experience, an impressive plan for running the school and will have to have passed numerous tests to prove that they have the capacity to run the schools to a high standard. These requirements for organisations will be the best way to ensure that schools become more cost effective under the Voucher System and make education a more competitive sector in the process.

    What is most important to note is that standards will increase, massively, rather than decrease as a result of these plans. As outlined, schools will receive more per student than they currently do allowing schools to afford excellent facilities and compete with the better-off students in currently independent schools such as Eton. Therefore, standards would progressively increase, creating an environment in which everyone, no matter their background, will be able to embark on a world- class education, which will not only guarantee them the opportunity to compete with more privileged children, but also gain the skills that will allow them to pursue their dreams all over the world.


    Costing

    (1) There are currently 7.7 million students in state primary and secondary schools. Hence, at an average of £6,389 per pupil (including primary and secondary schools), this will equate to a maximum cost of £49,195,300,000. Other spending will be maintained at current levels. At a minimum, this bill will save the Government £14,634,700,000 per year.

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...MG8/edit#gid=0

    (2) In reality, it will save even more based on the amount of money the Voucher System will provide to parents. Below, you can see the provisional amount of money that parents will pay for their first child’s education (as mentioned above, all further children will be fully funded by the Voucher System.)













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    No no no. We've seen with the academy system that private business meddling in state schools has been a disaster. This only serves to make it worse. I implore all members of the house to vote no on this bill that will be a disaster for our children.

    Combine this with the introduction of additional grammar schools by stealth, and by the looks of it - charging everyone for school unless your from a low and poor income background. Would the Libbers show which tax they propose to remove to make this suddenly affordable for everyone.

    Edit: Also the suggestion that the market is more efficient at everything in this case is highly incorrect - hence the issue's we are currently facing with Academy Systems that are obsessed with bringing in high-cost leadership teams and crushing the teachers who are actually doing the teachers.
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    (Original post by Afcwimbledon2)
    No no no. We've seen with the academy system that private business meddling in state schools has been a disaster. This only serves to make it worse. I implore all members of the house to vote no on this bill that will be a disaster for our children.
    I disagree. More funding, reduced number of schools to be run per person/organisation, closes the social divide, better education for all
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    God no, I won't be voting for any bills that retain academic selection.
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    Nay - Not in favour of all the agenda you've set out in this bill.
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    (Original post by Afcwimbledon2)
    No no no. We've seen with the academy system that private business meddling in state schools has been a disaster. This only serves to make it worse. I implore all members of the house to vote no on this bill that will be a disaster for our children.

    Combine this with the introduction of additional grammar schools by stealth, and by the looks of it - charging everyone for school unless your from a low and poor income background. Would the Libbers show which tax they propose to remove to make this suddenly affordable for everyone.
    Charging everyone for an affordable fee for a education that will be miles better, with more funding - the fees are affordable, with a new bill for tax coming soon that will make this even more affordable. We aren't introducing the Grammar School by stealth, we feel it is obvious this is what we want to do. Grammar Schools are a good thing, and I'm surprised you think otherwise
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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    God no, I won't be voting for any bills that retain academic selection.
    Why?
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    (Original post by That'sGreat)
    Charging everyone for an affordable fee for a education that will be miles better, with more funding - the fees are affordable, with a new bill for tax coming soon that will make this even more affordable. We aren't introducing the Grammar School by stealth, we feel it is obvious this is what we want to do. Grammar Schools are a good thing, and I'm surprised you think otherwise
    So I ask again... with what money?

    Because if this passes, and your tax cut fails - guess what: suddenly everyone has to pay for school.

    I'd like to see evidence that charging everyone will be miles better and instead won't just stop people going to school.

    Grammar Schools in a holistic education offering that focuses on getting people ready to make a difference is great... but any implementation I've seen has been a disaster. Which includes this.

    I wholeheartedly would back a state run system that allows people to choose the pathway without having good schools or bad schools. Education shouldn't just be about academic performance, it should be about skills that people will need. Not everyone is great at academia and that understanding needs to be added to our education system. This bill does not achieve this.

    Can you also show how the current academy system which is in effect what you've suggested in all but name has shown how the market is better at state education?
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    (Original post by Afcwimbledon2)
    So I ask again... with what money?

    Because if this passes, and your tax cut fails - guess what: suddenly everyone has to pay for school.

    I'd like to see evidence that charging everyone will be miles better and instead won't just stop people going to school.

    Grammar Schools in a holistic education offering that focuses on getting people ready to make a difference is great... but any implementation I've seen has been a disaster. Which includes this.

    Can you also show how the current academy system which is in effect what you've suggested in all but name has shown how the market is better at state education?

    The tax cuts are irrelevant, they're still completely affordable and free for the majority

    Why do you oppose the Grammar School system?
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    (Original post by Afcwimbledon2)
    Would the Libbers show which tax they propose to remove to make this suddenly affordable for everyone.
    The Libertarian Party will be putting out a lot of bills regarding taxation over the coming weeks to ensure that everybody is better off. Regardless, as outlined in the spreadsheet linked, this bill will ensure that:

    a) Those in low-income households will not have to pay for their first child's education.
    b) Only those in high-income households will have to pay for their first child's education.
    c) Children after the first will be fully funded regardless of household income, ensuring larger families are not hit hard by this.

    It is also important to remember that this bill will save over £15 billion of taxpayers' money, which will help fund other bills that regard reduction of taxation.

    To you and others who claim this will not improve standards - every school, regardless of area, will receive £2,000 more per student than they currently do. This bill states that to run a school, they must prove they will use this money effectively. It is self-explanatory that by reducing inefficiencies and still reinvesting in the education of children, this bill will be using taxpayers' money in a better manner. More importantly, this bill is fiscally responsible in doing so.

    EDIT: To those who may have missed the spreadsheet, please look at this.
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    Nay - I don't like the idea of private businesses being involved with schools. We need not for profit organisations or the government.


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    (Original post by Saunders16)
    The Libertarian Party will be putting out a lot of bills regarding taxation over the coming weeks to ensure that everybody is better off. Regardless, as outlined in the spreadsheet linked, this bill will ensure that:

    a) Those in low-income households will not have to pay for their first child's education.
    b) Only those in high-income households will have to pay for their first child's education.
    c) Children after the first will be fully funded regardless of household income, ensuring larger families are not hit hard by this.

    It is also important to remember that this bill will save over £15 billion of taxpayers' money, which will help fund other bills that regard reduction of taxation.

    To you and others who claim this will not improve standards - every school, regardless of area, will receive £2,000 more per student than they currently do. This bill states that to run a school, they must prove they will use this money effectively. It is self-explanatory that by reducing inefficiencies and still reinvesting in the education of children, this bill will be using taxpayers' money in a better manner. More importantly, this bill is fiscally responsible in doing so.

    EDIT: To those who may have missed the spreadsheet, please look at this.
    If they are as poor as this: Good Luck!

    Why not keep the system as it is? That children pay for their education once they leave education and are successful through their own taxes?

    Then we don't need what seems like a bureaucratic waste of time voucher system. We can stop this privatization nonsense - which has been happening in RL through Academies and has been proven to be inefficient, and focus on actually giving great education to kids instead of pushing through the ideology of the rich and nasty on everyone.
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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Nay - I don't like the idea of private businesses being involved with schools. We need not for profit organisations or the government.


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    Why don't you like the idea? They can only make a set amount of £225 per pupil, that is the only possible source of income
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    (Original post by That'sGreat)
    Why don't you like the idea? They can only make a set amount of £225 per pupil, that is the only possible source of income
    They'll be there for the money, not the education of the children


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    The definition of section 1(4) is contradictory to the definition in section 1(6) because public schools are the same as private schools; the one type of school cannot have two conflicting definitions. I support the purpose of the bill but the implementation of the idea is terrible; private primary schools should not be forced to sit tests, the barriers for entry to selective schools are not stated, and the cost of education is going to be unaffordable for poorer parents.

    (Original post by Saunders16)
    The Libertarian Party will be putting out a lot of bills regarding taxation over the coming weeks to ensure that everybody is better off. Regardless, as outlined in the spreadsheet linked, this bill will ensure that:

    a) Those in low-income households will not have to pay for their first child's education.
    b) Only those in high-income households will have to pay for their first child's education.
    c) Children after the first will be fully funded regardless of household income, ensuring larger families are not hit hard by this.

    It is also important to remember that this bill will save over £15 billion of taxpayers' money, which will help fund other bills that regard reduction of taxation.

    To you and others who claim this will not improve standards - every school, regardless of area, will receive £2,000 more per student than they currently do. This bill states that to run a school, they must prove they will use this money effectively. It is self-explanatory that by reducing inefficiencies and still reinvesting in the education of children, this bill will be using taxpayers' money in a better manner. More importantly, this bill is fiscally responsible in doing so.

    EDIT: To those who may have missed the spreadsheet, please look at this.
    Low-income backgrounds has not been defined making that clause in the bill a waste of writing. And it is unfair to expect wealthy parents to pay for the education of strangers, who may not appreciate education, and the education of their children. In the system as it is, parents have the choice of paying more for the child's education, forcing wealthier parents to pay for education when poorer parents do not, is makes the system a de facto tax on wealthy parents which is against the Libertarian Party claims of wanting lower taxes.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    The definition of section 1(4) is contradictory to the definition in section 1(6) because public schools are the same as private schools; the one type of school cannot have two conflicting definitions. I support the purpose of the bill but the implementation of the idea is terrible; private primary schools should not be forced to sit tests, the barriers for entry to selective schools are not stated, and the cost of education is going to be affordable for poorer parents.

    Low-income backgrounds has not been defined making that clause in the bill a waste of writing. And it is unfair to expect wealthy parents to pay for the education of strangers, who may not appreciate education, and the education of their children. In the system as it is, parents have the choice of paying more for the child's education, forcing wealthier parents to pay for education when poorer parents do not, is makes the system a de facto tax on wealthy parents which is against the Libertarian Party claims of wanting lower taxes.
    For the first time ever - I agree with you Nigel.

    Also - do you not agree the current system is in effect that pupils pay for the education once they are in the world of work?
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    Surprising how grammar school selection is attacked so much whilst there is a similar system for entering University, maybe we should ace that too? Maybe those going Cambridge should not be exceptional students but students who live nearby as with the current broken secondary school system
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    (Original post by Afcwimbledon2)
    If they are as poor as this: Good Luck!

    Why not keep the system as it is? That children pay for their education once they leave education and are successful through their own taxes?

    Then we don't need what seems like a bureaucratic waste of time voucher system. We can stop this privatization nonsense - which has been happening in RL through Academies and has been proven to be inefficient, and focus on actually giving great education to kids instead of pushing through the ideology of the rich and nasty on everyone.
    It is unfair and irresponsible to not modify the current system with a large budget deficit and educational standards that are lacking on the international scale. We wish to allow the organisations (which will, on almost every occasion, be the current individuals who run schools) to have more money to work with and to introduce more competition in addition to allow schools to rise each other's standards.

    Part of our plan to allow improvement to happen is to ensure two things: that the government does not allow parents who can afford to pay a bit more do so (in addition to the tax cuts we will propose that will render the difference negligible), and that the amount people have to pay is fair and relative to their household income.

    By not supporting the proposals that you allege are 'bureaucratic waste', government expenditure (and by extention, the taxpayers' you wish to defend) is larger, and - I reiterate - schools are £2,000 per pupil, or £2,000,000 per 1000 students, worse off. This proposal of 'bureaucratic waste' exists to ensure that the inefficiencies you describe do not take place across the nation.
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    (Original post by Saunders16)
    It is unfair and irresponsible to not modify the current system with a large budget deficit and educational standards that are lacking on the international scale. We wish to allow the organisations (which will, on almost every occasion, be the current individuals who run schools) to have more money to work with and to introduce more competition in addition to allow schools to rise each other's standards.

    Part of our plan to allow improvement to happen is to ensure two things: that the government does not allow parents who can afford to pay a bit more do so (in addition to the tax cuts we will propose that will render the difference negligible), and that the amount people have to pay is fair and relative to their household income.

    By not supporting the proposals that you allege are 'bureaucratic waste', government expenditure (and by extention, the taxpayers' you wish to defend) is larger, and - I reiterate - schools are £2,000 per pupil, or £2,000,000 per 1000 students, worse off. This proposal of 'bureaucratic waste' exists to ensure that the inefficiencies you describe do not take place across the nation.
    Correct - the current system needs to be rolled back. End the failed experiment of businesses involved in education and let Local Government do something it was good at.
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    (Original post by Afcwimbledon2)
    For the first time ever - I agree with you Nigel.

    Also - do you not agree the current system is in effect that pupils pay for the education once they are in the world of work?
    For the pupils who attend state schools you are right, they are paying later for the education they received when young. This bill would be better if school fees were treated like university tuition fees in the days of free tuition, where the independent schools participating in the scheme have a limit on the highest fees that can be charged with government paying a subsidy to the parents to cover the cost of school fees.
 
 
 
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