Curtiswood94
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Hey guys, I am 23 years old and would like to self study A level maths.

My problem is at GCSE (take 7 years ago) I didn't get a reasonable grade (D) as I goofed around throughout the whole of high school.

Therefor, I would like to know if it would be possible to just SKIP GCSE maths and go straight to A level and self study? Work my ass off and achieve a good grade A/A*?

Thanks, Curtis.


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Maths=Passion
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(Original post by Curtiswood94)
Hey guys, I am 23 years old and would like to self study A level maths.

My problem is at GCSE (take 7 years ago) I didn't get a reasonable grade (D) as I goofed around throughout the whole of high school.

Therefor, I would like to know if it would be possible to just SKIP GCSE maths and go straight to A level and self study? Work my ass off and achieve a good grade A/A*?

Thanks, Curtis.


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Sure you can! However, I'd really suggest you start by doing GCSE maths because you probably lack the understanding which is integral for A-Level maths, especially if you want a good grade. Realistically, if you start now, then you can probably sit the whole A-Level maths course next June, you also need to a choose an exam board before you start, good ones to choose are Edexcel, OCR or AQA.

If you want to sit it next June, you're looking at 6 exam papers, 4 Core maths papers and 2 additional maths papers (Discrete, statistics, or mechanics, which you choose). Once you've chosen your choices, then you'll need the textbooks (Core 1-Core4) and then your additional maths textbook (Mechanics/Statistics or Discrete). The core modules 1 and 2 and the first additional paper are relatively easy, however the 2nd additional paper and the core modules 3 and 4 are much harder. That's why usually you split them into 2 years, which you could choose, it would just mean you'd spend 2 years studying maths, which you might not want .

Some good advice would be to learn GCSE over the Summer and make sure you understand the content and then start trying to learn the A-Level maths. If you have any questions, feel free to ask, it definitely doable, but you'd probably need about 5hours a week of maths to be done before Christmas and then between January-June, you'll want to do more and making sure you know the content and practising past papers which are readily available online.
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fefssdf
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(Original post by Curtiswood94)
Hey guys, I am 23 years old and would like to self study A level maths.

My problem is at GCSE (take 7 years ago) I didn't get a reasonable grade (D) as I goofed around throughout the whole of high school.

Therefor, I would like to know if it would be possible to just SKIP GCSE maths and go straight to A level and self study? Work my ass off and achieve a good grade A/A*?

Thanks, Curtis.


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I'd say it is definetly possible with the right resources. First off you need to get the relevant textbooks and then I suggest working through the examples and then attempting the questions. If you don't understand what is going on then go back and google / use YouTube and try and learn a topic. For instance I know you need to be good with surds and basic algebra when starting Alevel so perhaps this is a topic you'd have to brush up on.

It is certainly possible cause I mean I did Alevel maths and further maths and I had to self teach two statistics modules and I got A's in them through just using the textbook, YouTube, and many past papers.
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Curtiswood94
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Thanks for the responses!

I am going to try and just learn as I go and use YouTube/online resources to brush up on previous stuff... I think this would be best for me , as currently I have a lot of time... plus I really enjoy maths😀

Also, could anyone explain how a level maths is examined, like for example, after you complete your first module... let's say C1, Do you then take a test after you have learned each module or will you just complete one test with all modules thrown into it?

If anyone could recommended some good online resources/books would be a huge help also!

Thanks again.


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Maths=Passion
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(Original post by Curtiswood94)
Thanks for the responses!

I am going to try and just learn as I go and use YouTube/online resources to brush up on previous stuff... I think this would be best for me , as currently I have a lot of time... plus I really enjoy maths😀

Also, could anyone explain how a level maths is examined, like for example, after you complete your first module... let's say C1, Do you then take a test after you have learned each module or will you just complete one test with all modules thrown into it?

If anyone could recommended some good online resources/books would be a huge help also!

Thanks again.


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That sounds good! Yeah, Youtube is your best bet for being stuck, really if you want to start you just need to choose an exam board and stick with them!

Hiya, the maths modules are usually broken down into around 8 topics, these are also usually the chapters in your textbook! For example, the AQA A-Level textbook has 10 chapters in the Core 3 section and the Core 4 section has 9 chapters. Each paper is 75 marks and you have to answer all the questions.

Typically, they'll ask you a question on every topic (although some topics can merge together), which usually means the exam paper is between 7-10 questions. For the exams:

- Core 1 they assume you know GCSE maths and some elements of Core 2 can be put in, though it is very rare.
- Core 2 they assume you also know GCSE maths and elements of Core 1 can be put in, though again it's extremely rare.
- Core 3 they assume you know Core 1 and Core 2 and elements of Core 4 as the topics can interlink in areas such as Integration and differentiation.
- Core 4 they assume you know Core 1 and Core 2 and elements of Core 3 as elements can interlink.

Overall though, the exam will almost always just be on the individual module itself. For the additional papers, it's the same. The 1st paper they assume you know GCSE and the 2nd paper they assume you know the 1st paper and GCSE.

If you choose AQA for example, you can find playlists like these:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCg..._id=18&sort=dd

Other exam boards have them too, it's quite easy to find. I would suggest learning as much as you can from the textbook though, as maths is all about doing and revert to videos where you're stuck or if you prefer to learn that way.

Best of luck, if you have any questions feel free to ask
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