username2553161
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I want to do an ASNAC degree, [Anglo Saxon, Norse and Celtic] however their only seems to be one offered in the entire country at Cambridge.

Is it elitist that only Cambridge seems to offer a degree where you can study your own history?

http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a... rse-and-celtic

My genetic make up is Norse, Saxon and Celtic. As is most of the British Isles, yet Greco-Roman civilisation is available everywhere, and Norse, Saxon and Celtic history/mythology is only available at Cambridge.

Seems vastly stupid to me that we cannot learn about our own ancestry in our own country.

Or is it because, the Normans are considered the winners in history, and our empire followed the Roman example, so this degree is the ancestry of the plebs?

These ASNAC courses should be offered throughout the country at red brick Uni's/
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Tubbz
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(Original post by Rover73)
I want to do an ASNAC degree, [Anglo Saxon, Norse and Celtic] however their only seems to be one offered in the entire country at Cambridge.

Is it elitist that only Cambridge seems to offer a degree where you can study your own history?

http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a... rse-and-celtic

My genetic make up is Norse, Saxon and Celtic. As is most of the British Isles, yet Greco-Roman civilisation is available everywhere, and Norse, Saxon and Celtic history/mythology is only available at Cambridge.

Seems vastly stupid to me that we cannot learn about our own ancestry in our own country.

Or is it because, the Normans are considered the winners in history, and our empire followed the Roman example, so this degree is the ancestry of the plebs?

These ASNAC courses should be offered throughout the country at red brick Uni's/
Cambridge is able to offer more specialised courses due to the appeal it has as an institution.

Similar courses are offered elsewhere, and with no interest myself, and very little time spend on google, found other places offer more diverse courses, which allow you to specialise in certain eras.

Ancient history in most other places, might be worth taking another look elsewhere if Cambridge isn't your preferred establishment.

EDIT:

Places also offer celtic studies, for certain bits, it would appear Cambridge either narrows, or broadens it a bit, compared to other courses.

http://www.gla.ac.uk/undergraduate/d...celticstudies/
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Doones
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Also Scandinavian Studies is a thing elsewhere...

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-stu...an-studies-ba/

Or can be part of a university's history program
Eg https://www.abdn.ac.uk/sdhp/discipli...tudies-352.php

And Celtic Studies too
https://courses.aber.ac.uk/undergrad...tudies-degree/

No elitism needed.

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artful_lounger
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UCL has a Viking Studies course, and Nottingham and Oxford both have Viking/Anglo Saxon studies research groups, and options to study these through their history/archaeology/ancient history courses. Glasgow and Edinburgh both have options to study Celtic history either explicitly as Celtic Studies or through Scottish History and related courses, as well as English literature and language which have deep relations to the area.

What's elitist is your presumption that simply because you have some tenuous link to the area every single major UK university should cater to your interest. Anglo Saxon and Viking Studies is a relatively niche area and there isn't much to teach at an undergraduate level because the real material is all necessarily graduate level research. Conversely Greek and Latin civilisations covered at times huge swathes of Europe and have indelibly affected the structure of modern society through the political and legal systems that much of modern "western" civilisation operate under, not to mention the deep linguistic links to an entire families of European and Eastern European languages.

While both are valuable in themselves it is somewhat absurd that you think yourself so superior to every other ANSAC researcher who has gone through a standard training in related areas of academic study to provide a broad basis and transferable skills to study their niche area, and act as though you deserve some specialist treatment. The only person I know who is interested in the area, is from the US, and is studying English literature, while also taking courses in history, classical civisilation, German and Latin. He seems to be able to realise the interdisciplinary nature of the subject area requires a broad array of expertise in order to and relishes the opportunity to develop these skills, so it begs the question of why you aren't able to?

This is clearly an indefensible position to take if you intend to continue in academia in this area, and if you just want to take it as an "any degree" then try and get some job in banking or finance, you frame yourself as even more insufferable.
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username2553161
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(Original post by Tubbz)
Cambridge is able to offer more specialised courses due to the appeal it has as an institution.

Similar courses are offered elsewhere, and with no interest myself, and very little time spend on google, found other places offer more diverse courses, which allow you to specialise in certain eras.

Ancient history in most other places, might be worth taking another look elsewhere if Cambridge isn't your preferred establishment.

EDIT:

Places also offer celtic studies, for certain bits, it would appear Cambridge either narrows, or broadens it a bit, compared to other courses.

http://www.gla.ac.uk/undergraduate/d...celticstudies/
Thankyou Tubbz, I did actually do a google, but never saw the Glasgow ad. You saw other places, is that plural, cause I cant find any. Id be wanting to do an undergrad course, for fun, knowledge, rather than work. Thats an MA so I couldnt do that one. Personal situation, incurable illness, and just wanted to keep my brain ticking over with something which interests me. Ideally a distance learning BA would be great.

Cambridge actually state on their site:

If you’re fascinated by medieval history, literature and languages, and you relish the prospect of doing your own research using original source materials, this course – unique in the UK to Cambridge – will appeal.
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username2553161
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Also Scandinavian Studies is a thing elsewhere...

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-stu...an-studies-ba/

Or can be part of a university's history program
Eg https://www.abdn.ac.uk/sdhp/discipli...tudies-352.php

And Celtic Studies too
https://courses.aber.ac.uk/undergrad...tudies-degree/

No elitism needed.

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Thankyou Doonesbury, the celtic one looks most interesting, but not as interesting as the cambridge one which covers the whole ASNAC periods. So it seems ASNAC is only offered by Cambridge as a 'whole subject' or am I wrong?
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Basiil17
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(Original post by Rover73)
Thankyou Tubbz, I did actually do a google, but never saw the Glasgow ad. You saw other places, is that plural, cause I cant find any. Id be wanting to do an undergrad course, for fun, knowledge, rather than work. Thats an MA so I couldnt do that one. Personal situation, incurable illness, and just wanted to keep my brain ticking over with something which interests me. Ideally a distance learning BA would be great.

Cambridge actually state on their site:

If you’re fascinated by medieval history, literature and languages, and you relish the prospect of doing your own research using original source materials, this course – unique in the UK to Cambridge – will appeal.
If it as a 4 year MA at Glasgow, then you can do it, it's a ancient Scottish uni tradition to award MA's rather than BA's
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Tubbz
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(Original post by Rover73)
Thankyou Tubbz, I did actually do a google, but never saw the Glasgow ad. You saw other places, is that plural, cause I cant find any. Id be wanting to do an undergrad course, for fun, knowledge, rather than work. Thats an MA so I couldnt do that one. Personal situation, incurable illness, and just wanted to keep my brain ticking over with something which interests me. Ideally a distance learning BA would be great.

Cambridge actually state on their site:

If you’re fascinated by medieval history, literature and languages, and you relish the prospect of doing your own research using original source materials, this course – unique in the UK to Cambridge – will appeal.
I think the unique element is because they cover every aspect. It looks like you're going to need to refine down a little, and pick which elements you want to study. Not everyone has the same resources as Cambridge, hence no where else offering the full spectrum under a single course.
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Doones
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(Original post by Rover73)
Thankyou Tubbz, I did actually do a google, but never saw the Glasgow ad. ... Thats an MA so I couldnt do that one.
Undergrad degrees at the "ancient" Scottish universities are Masters (like Oxbridge, and Trinity College Dublin).
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Doones
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(Original post by Rover73)
Thankyou Doonesbury, the celtic one looks most interesting, but not as interesting as the cambridge one which covers the whole ASNAC periods. So it seems ASNAC is only offered by Cambridge as a 'whole subject' or am I wrong?
Here's a distance learning BA

http://www.uwtsd.ac.uk/ba-celtic-studies/
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username2553161
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UCL has a Viking Studies course, and Nottingham and Oxford both have Viking/Anglo Saxon studies research groups, and options to study these through their history/archaeology/ancient history courses.

Thankyou, I'll have a look at Nottingham.

What's elitist is your presumption that simply because you have some tenuous link to the area every single major UK university should cater to your interest.

PishTosh and nonsense.

Anglo Saxon and Viking Studies is a relatively niche area and there isn't much to teach at an undergraduate level because the real material is all necessarily graduate level research.

Yeh, except Cambridge, who offer undergrad BA's

Conversely Greek and Latin civilisations covered at times huge swathes of Europe and have indelibly affected the structure of modern society through the political and legal systems that much of modern "western" civilisation operate under, not to mention the deep linguistic links to an entire families of European and Eastern European languages.\

Whilst thats undoubtedly true, its not what I was looking for. Specifically an ASNAC BA.

While both are valuable in themselves it is somewhat absurd that you think yourself so superior to every other ANSAC researcher who has gone through a standard training in related areas of academic study to provide a broad basis and transferable skills to study their niche area, and act as though you deserve some specialist treatment.

Wrong side of bed, bad with people, or just naturally condascending?

The only person I know who is interested in the area, is from the US, and is studying English literature, while also taking courses in history, classical civisilation, German and Latin. He seems to be able to realise the interdisciplinary nature of the subject area requires a broad array of expertise in order to and relishes the opportunity to develop these skills, so it begs the question of why you aren't able to?

Jesus! Sorry Sir!

This is clearly an indefensible position to take if you intend to continue in academia in this area, and if you just want to take it as an "any degree" then try and get some job in banking or finance, you frame yourself as even more insufferable.

Oh piss off! FFS!
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username2553161
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(Original post by Doonesbury)
Here's a distance learning BA

http://www.uwtsd.ac.uk/ba-celtic-studies/
Hey great stuff. Many thanks. Good starting point for me.
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username2553161
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(Original post by Tubbz)
I think the unique element is because they cover every aspect. It looks like you're going to need to refine down a little, and pick which elements you want to study. Not everyone has the same resources as Cambridge, hence no where else offering the full spectrum under a single course.
Right, I get it now, thankyou for the help.
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username2553161
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(Original post by DreamlinerFinder)
If it as a 4 year MA at Glasgow, then you can do it, it's a ancient Scottish uni tradition to award MA's rather than BA's
I didnt know that, thankyou.
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Doones
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(Original post by Rover73)
Hey great stuff. Many thanks. Good starting point for me.
I'm tagging in our resident expert on both Scandinavian Studies AND distance learning.
Snufkin :viking:


For example, the OU *might* offer some relevant modules (idk).
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username2553161
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What does Im tagging mean, does that he will see this, or I should contact him?

Ive tried the OU, not found anything, unless Ive missed it.

Cheers Doonesbury.
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Basiil17
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(Original post by Rover73)
What does Im tagging mean, does that he will see this, or I should contact him?

Ive tried the OU, not found anything, unless Ive missed it.

Cheers Doonesbury.
Snufkin will be along here next time he's online as it will show in his notification bell that Doonesbury tagged him, and he'll explain.
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username2553161
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Great stuff thanks, already called The university in Wales, Doonesburys link, and had a positive sounding conversation with one of the staff, getting a call back!

I'd really be over the moon if i could do something like this.
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username2553161
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Im gonna dip my toe back in, in by doing this little course first.

https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/...HV#application

I've already read the coursework books.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by Rover73)
snip
I believe Cambridge is the only place in the UK which covers all three, but you can study two of the three subjects you're interested in at several other universities.

As has been mentioned, UCL does a degree in Old Norse and Viking Studies, but they also do a joint degree in Scandinavian Studies and English (where it is possible to take modules in Old English and medieval literature). Both these degrees require you to learn one of the modern Scandinavian languages alongside Old Norse.

Edinburgh also does Scandinavian Studies, although I don't believe you start learning Old Norse until the final year (note: it may be possible to study Old Norse and Runology on your year abroad). You can combine Scandinavian Studies with Celtic Studies, English (Language or Literature), History or Sottish Ethnology.

Aberystwyth probably has the most comprehensive Celtic Studies degree in the UK, but they also do a Liberal Arts degree which enables you to take Celtic Studies modules alongside medieval history and medieval English modules.

Aberdeen does a degree in Anglo-Saxon and Celtic Studies; you can combine this with English, Gaelic, Archaeology etc. I think it may be possible to study Swedish for the first two years also.

St Andrews do degrees in Mediaeval History, Mediaeval History and Archaeology and Mediaeval Studies.

TCD does a degree in Early Irish and History.

I suggest you research these degrees and pay close attention to the modules (particularly St Andrews), you may be able to study the things you're interested in even if the degree name itself doesn't mention the Celts or Vikings.

(Original post by Doonesbury)
I'm tagging in our resident expert on both Scandinavian Studies AND distance learning.
Snufkin :viking:
Tbh there's not much left to say, you and artful_lounger have already covered everything. Here are the relevant distance learning courses I know of:

NUI Galway does two online diplomas in Irish Studies and Irish Archaeology.

Uppsala University does distance learning modules in Celtic History and Culture, Introduction to Celtic Literature, Irish Love Poetry, Modern Irish, Modern Welsh, Old Irish and Old Irish Reading (Literature).

The University of the Highlands and Islands offer a number of bachelor degrees in History, Culture and Heritage, Archaeology etc. which all include aspects of both Celtic and Viking Studies. They may be available to study remotely (it's not guaranteed, but from what I understand, it is possible - worth asking).

Oxford's Department for Continuing Education does online modules in 'Who are the Celts?' and 'Vikings: Raiders, Traders and Settlers'.

The OU does a module 'The making of Welsh history' which covers some aspects of medieval Celtic studies.

The University of Dundee does an online module in 'Medieval and early modern Scotland 1100–1707' which includes a little bit of Viking and Celtic studies.

Sabhal Mòr Ostaig offers distance learning beginners (An Cùrsa Inntrigidh) and intermediate (An Cùrsa Adhartais) courses in Scottish Gaelic, and a distance learning degree in Gaelic Language and Culture.
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