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University of Leeds or Exeter?

Hello,
I have applied for the following courses.

Uni of Leeds: Environmental Engineering and Project Management
Uni of Exeter: Water Engineering
I have got an offer from both these places however I am having a tough time deciding.
Anyone got an input to help decide?
Those courses sound very different from each other? Pick the course you'll enjoy the most, both unis are pretty good :smile:
Reply 2
Well I would choose Exeter, why? well...

1. I work in Exeter (will be living there next year currently in a small village off abit)
2. I work as a Developer for South West Water (Wate Wholesaler lots of water engineering :h: )
Reply 3
Original post by NotKidding
Those courses sound very different from each other? Pick the course you'll enjoy the most, both unis are pretty good :smile:


They are in a way, the one at Exeter seems very techinical with their programming and informatics modules.
Reply 4
Original post by Kraggor
Well I would choose Exeter, why? well...

1. I work in Exeter (will be living there next year currently in a small village off abit)
2. I work as a Developer for South West Water (Wate Wholesaler lots of water engineering :h: )


Thats another thing, I know Exeter is brilliant for its industrial connections.
Original post by AmmeS
Hello,
I have applied for the following courses.

Uni of Leeds: Environmental Engineering and Project Management
Uni of Exeter: Water Engineering
I have got an offer from both these places however I am having a tough time deciding.
Anyone got an input to help decide?


Are these undergrad or postgrad degrees?
Reply 6
Original post by AmmeS
Hello,
I have applied for the following courses.

Uni of Leeds: Environmental Engineering and Project Management
Uni of Exeter: Water Engineering
I have got an offer from both these places however I am having a tough time deciding.
Anyone got an input to help decide?


i had offers from both leeds and exeter, for maths+compsci. ended up putting exeter as my firm choice, really enjoyed the open day+interview. honestly though i'd probably just go with whichever you prefer for your course, and whoever has given you the lowest offer :biggrin:
Reply 7
Original post by Smack
Are these undergrad or postgrad degrees?


Yes these are post grad.
Part of me says Exeter has a very good reputation in environmental engineering, the other part of me says I've seen the quality of work that has come from their master's students and it was noticeably subpar compared to students in my field from other unis (I'm currently a research assistant in Offshore energy which Exeter classes as Environmental, and my sponsor works with Exeter a lot).
Reply 9
Original post by Helloworld_95
Part of me says Exeter has a very good reputation in environmental engineering, the other part of me says I've seen the quality of work that has come from their master's students and it was noticeably subpar compared to students in my field from other unis (I'm currently a research assistant in Offshore energy which Exeter classes as Environmental, and my sponsor works with Exeter a lot).


I have spoken to my lecturers at my uni today, and I think I will go with leeds, they said what you did. They said that the university of exeter has excellent reputation but working with them hasnt lived up to it. They also said the course has Leeds gives me broader topics to work with.
Original post by Helloworld_95
Part of me says Exeter has a very good reputation in environmental engineering, the other part of me says I've seen the quality of work that has come from their master's students and it was noticeably subpar compared to students in my field from other unis (I'm currently a research assistant in Offshore energy which Exeter classes as Environmental, and my sponsor works with Exeter a lot).


In what ways was it sub par? And is this more down to the individual students rather than the department as a whole?

Posted from TSR Mobile
Original post by AmmeS
Thats another thing, I know Exeter is brilliant for its industrial connections.


I have no idea where this idea came from but the Engineering department doesn't have much in that way. There are two ways they do it for undergrad; working in industry and writing reflective reports on it and giving a poster presentation on the work done as a module, which is entirely student led (students are the ones who seek out and arrange the placement). The other is to do your BEng project abroad which may be with an industrial sponsor; there are a few that are well regarded (e.g. Mercedes in Germany) but they're quite varied and not all are quite that prestigious.

Original post by AmmeS
They are in a way, the one at Exeter seems very techinical with their programming and informatics modules.


The programming elements of the MSc courses are, as I'm aware, done as a half term short course where a significant component is self teaching. The teaching was also at the time I was there done by the maths staff (engineering, maths and CS all share a single building; CS is very much applied i.e. web development etc).

Original post by Helloworld_95
Part of me says Exeter has a very good reputation in environmental engineering, the other part of me says I've seen the quality of work that has come from their master's students and it was noticeably subpar compared to students in my field from other unis (I'm currently a research assistant in Offshore energy which Exeter classes as Environmental, and my sponsor works with Exeter a lot).


They have the STREAM IDC sure, but teaching at the undergraduate and masters level is fairly mixed from what my friends on the civil course said. It's also worth noting, there is a split with Exeter; a lot of the environmentally oriented stuff, including in engineering, is based on their Cornwall campus. I can't comment on their teaching or research, but it's more or less entirely separate to the main campus in Exeter itself, which as noted seems a bit mixed. I believe the STREAM IDC and the Water Engineering course are based on the main campus however.

Overall my impression of Exeter's engineering department was that it needed work. Their electronic and some (i.e. electronic and magnetic) materials research relied heavily on the quality and expertise of the physics department there (notably the graphene section) and was somewhat weak otherwise. The mechanical research I got the impression was quite a mixed bag; if you weren't in CFD there wasn't much going for you. Similarly Civil focused heavily on the CFD side and water engineering, and the water engineering was more or less entirely revolving around Dragan Savic, who does a good amount of research in the area but didn't impress colleagues as an undergrad lecturer at least; I didn't hear any grand tales of him as a supervisor for BEng/MEng projects either, although I didn't hear any horror stories either...

Exeter's strengths simply lie in other departments. Their graphene and astrophysics groups are major centers in the physics department, and I'm told their business (including economics) work at least attracts significant industry funding. Their more social sciences/humanities oriented work in e.g. law, classics and archaeology is supposed to be very good at least at the undegraduate (and in the latter case, masters) level, and I would imagine this stems from good teaching staff among the research faculty (who are likely to be good supervisors in the sense of actually ensuring you know your area well and learn relevant aspects that are difficult for you, rather than using you as a publication guinea pig which you incidentally benefit from).

Frankly the engineering building and the departments it holds are both fairly ramshackle and get carried/hidden by the universities reputation in other areas (the metaphor falls apart a bit for the latter unless you consider it's reputation as a somewhat bucolic campus university; I'm not sure this can still be considered true with the Forum complex taking up a huge chunk in the middle now, and the new life science building towering over the surrounding wildlife). While I have no doubt Exeter's rankings have some merit to them in many of their departments (although they do heavily try to pander to student satisfaction which ends up leaving some other areas a bit lacking imo; they also miss the mark sometimes) engineering is not one of them (also CS and maths outside of climate modelling which mainly gets a bonus due to their relation with the Met Office).
Original post by Smack
In what ways was it sub par? And is this more down to the individual students rather than the department as a whole?

Posted from TSR Mobile


I would guess the department as a whole, I knew/was hinted at some of the grades of the work and they were getting 2:1s, firsts, for dissertations which would've been at 2:2 or below based on the ones I was reading from other unis.

From what I remember, the differences were: generally less ambitious projects, less consideration for variables which could affect their project, their writing also wasn't at the level you would expect from 3rd/4th years.
Original post by Helloworld_95
I would guess the department as a whole, I knew/was hinted at some of the grades of the work and they were getting 2:1s, firsts, for dissertations which would've been at 2:2 or below based on the ones I was reading from other unis.

From what I remember, the differences were: generally less ambitious projects, less consideration for variables which could affect their project, their writing also wasn't at the level you would expect from 3rd/4th years.


Oh also relating to this, my would-be supervisor for my BEng project was previously a postdoc from MIT and after half a year had to tweak her batch of students projects because "an MIT bachelor/master project as I would've set as a challenging project was basically a PhD thesis/topic at Exeter". While certainly MIT is a lofty height to aspire to, that's a huge discrepancy in project/dissertation/thesis level.
Reply 14
Original post by artful_lounger
I have no idea where this idea came from but the Engineering department doesn't have much in that way. There are two ways they do it for undergrad; working in industry and writing reflective reports on it and giving a poster presentation on the work done as a module, which is entirely student led (students are the ones who seek out and arrange the placement). The other is to do your BEng project abroad which may be with an industrial sponsor; there are a few that are well regarded (e.g. Mercedes in Germany) but they're quite varied and not all are quite that prestigious.



The programming elements of the MSc courses are, as I'm aware, done as a half term short course where a significant component is self teaching. The teaching was also at the time I was there done by the maths staff (engineering, maths and CS all share a single building; CS is very much applied i.e. web development etc).



They have the STREAM IDC sure, but teaching at the undergraduate and masters level is fairly mixed from what my friends on the civil course said. It's also worth noting, there is a split with Exeter; a lot of the environmentally oriented stuff, including in engineering, is based on their Cornwall campus. I can't comment on their teaching or research, but it's more or less entirely separate to the main campus in Exeter itself, which as noted seems a bit mixed. I believe the STREAM IDC and the Water Engineering course are based on the main campus however.

Overall my impression of Exeter's engineering department was that it needed work. Their electronic and some (i.e. electronic and magnetic) materials research relied heavily on the quality and expertise of the physics department there (notably the graphene section) and was somewhat weak otherwise. The mechanical research I got the impression was quite a mixed bag; if you weren't in CFD there wasn't much going for you. Similarly Civil focused heavily on the CFD side and water engineering, and the water engineering was more or less entirely revolving around Dragan Savic, who does a good amount of research in the area but didn't impress colleagues as an undergrad lecturer at least; I didn't hear any grand tales of him as a supervisor for BEng/MEng projects either, although I didn't hear any horror stories either...

Exeter's strengths simply lie in other departments. Their graphene and astrophysics groups are major centers in the physics department, and I'm told their business (including economics) work at least attracts significant industry funding. Their more social sciences/humanities oriented work in e.g. law, classics and archaeology is supposed to be very good at least at the undegraduate (and in the latter case, masters) level, and I would imagine this stems from good teaching staff among the research faculty (who are likely to be good supervisors in the sense of actually ensuring you know your area well and learn relevant aspects that are difficult for you, rather than using you as a publication guinea pig which you incidentally benefit from).

Frankly the engineering building and the departments it holds are both fairly ramshackle and get carried/hidden by the universities reputation in other areas (the metaphor falls apart a bit for the latter unless you consider it's reputation as a somewhat bucolic campus university; I'm not sure this can still be considered true with the Forum complex taking up a huge chunk in the middle now, and the new life science building towering over the surrounding wildlife). While I have no doubt Exeter's rankings have some merit to them in many of their departments (although they do heavily try to pander to student satisfaction which ends up leaving some other areas a bit lacking imo; they also miss the mark sometimes) engineering is not one of them (also CS and maths outside of climate modelling which mainly gets a bonus due to their relation with the Met Office).


This is really insightful. One of the main reasons I was unsure was because of the programming modules. I did computer science at my uni in first year and frankly I struggled with it a lot. I managed to scrape a 2:2 in first year and then quit it. Considering that the computer science department at my uni gave alot of help and I still struggled I did not want to sign up for this again. If the module is self taught its highly likely I am not going to be able to make any substantial progress with that module. Perhaps Leeds is a safer choice.
(edited 6 years ago)
Hey, what did you go with finally? i have an offer for advanced computer science from both leeds and exeter and im pretty confused
Original post by KHUSHI2512
Hey, what did you go with finally? i have an offer for advanced computer science from both leeds and exeter and im pretty confused

This thread is 4 years old now and the thread poster hasn’t been active since 2018 so i will be closing it, but feel free to start a new thread in the computer science section, which would probably be relevant for your queries.

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