Brexit: A Year On Watch

getfunky!
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Ahoyhoy:itsme:

To mark the anniversary of the Brexit vote, we'd like to you to voice your opinion on how you feel about Brexit, how it has affected your life, and what worries and impact you expect it to have on your life,

Be sure to also vote on our TSR poll here and what kind of Brexit you'd like here




A recap of the year:
It’s been a year since Britain voted to leave the European Union, a surprising decision that was supported by 52% to 48% of the electorate. Since then it’s been a point of contention across the country, and within parliament itself. Whichever side of the Commons its members sit they, they do not voice the same opinion – Just how do you exit the EU with the best of deals, appease all sides of the debate, and keep good relations with EU nations?

Since former Prime Minister David Cameron pledged for the vote in the face of an encroaching UKIP voice, he had expected to win the vote to Remain in the EU, feeling assured with a 10-point lead predicted by Andrew Cooper, Cameron’s official pollster for the Remain campaign. A questionable decision given Cooper’s record.

Hours later after the vote to leave was announced, Cameron declared his decision to step down by October, despite having reiterated that he would stay as PM whatever the outcome of the vote. Four days later, the first candidate – Stephen Crabb, announces his bid to become leader of the party. He withdrew after the second ballot, as did Andrea Leadsom, whilst Michael Gove was eliminated alongside Liam Fox. Leaving Theresa May unopposed, having only received 60.5% of the parliamentary party’s vote. Boris Johnson refused to stand as a candidate, no doubt brushing up on his world geography for his imminent appointment as Foreign Secretary.

Theresa May seemingly victorious, she moulded the cabinet to her liking, choosing to remove Michael Gove and George Osborne, the former whom she has since reinstated in her cabinet, and the latter has since become a critic of the PM.

In the months prior to her appointment as PM, May had fervently voiced her support for the Remain campaign. But with Brexit now on the agenda, she opted for an unusual approach – a “hard Brexit”. Rushing to enact Article 50, and alienating ties with pan-European industries and EU nations, her approach further collapsed in on itself with soundbites of ‘no deal is better than a bad deal’. An unpopular opinion with the opposition standing in front of her, but to prove her support ahead of the EU negotiations, "] May called for a snap election. Once again the polls were proven wrong, as an increased Conservative majority was expected, instead Conservative MPs lost seats, and May was left ..weakened and wobblier.

Facing a vote on her delayed Queen’s Speech, much to the chagrin of the Royal family, May has now tasked her party with forming a minority government with support from the most unsavoury of allies, the DUP, a deal has yet to be agreed upon.

Yet Brexit negotiations have begun, though not as was planned out, a “Hard Brexit” seems to be losing support within her own party. The EUs hand has been strengthened in the face of May’s decisions, and is now seeking to first secure a divorce bill before the finer points of Brexit are negotiated. A divorce bill which is estimated by some to be €100bn.

If anything has been missed, feel free to add to the discussion below
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Tubbz
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The year's been fairly beneficial, a surge in political engagement by young people, plus Corbyn and May getting embarrassed at the polls.
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harryleavey
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(Original post by Tubbz)
The year's been fairly beneficial, a surge in political engagement by young people, plus Corbyn and May getting embarrassed at the polls.
I'd agree. Beyond the economic uncertainty, I would say the vote itself has been positive, engaging more people in politics. Even if those now engaged are against the decision!
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ByEeek
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(Original post by harryleavey)
I'd agree. Beyond the economic uncertainty, I would say the vote itself has been positive, engaging more people in politics. Even if those now engaged are against the decision!
Positive? The nation has been split into two. Never before was a referendum of lies so devisive. We now have a weak government with no mandate relying on a party of creationists for support. Positive? My arse!
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harryleavey
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As if the nation was unified before.
Opinions will always be divided - and so what...?

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