Should I apply to do a Joint Honours Degree?

Watch
Ryan CS
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hi,

I'm wanting to do Biology/Biomedical Sciences at University but would also like to do Geography as well. I was thinking that the best choice might be to do a Joint Honours Degree in these two subjects.

I didn't know what courses are the best and at which Unis - I've looked at Exeter University's Course and I know Keele does some courses that specialise on these two subjects inparticular. I'm also not sure whether I might end up specialising in one particular depending on what grades I get. (More likely to be Geography at the moment)

Could someone please recommend any good courses for either Biology/Biomedical Sciences or Geography or even better if anyone has done a Joint Honours in these subjects can you tell me how it is to do it?

Thanks a lot,
Ryan
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
If you're interested in aspects of human biology and geography, you may want to look into Human Sciences courses; there are ones at Oxford, UCL and Exeter. It combines these two areas along with aspects of sociologyanthropology and evolutionary sciences
1
reply
Snufkin
Badges: 21
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
If you are interested in both subjects then a joint honours degree is the perfect option. I know Durham does a Natural Sciences degree where you can specialise in Biology and Geography (see here), and I think St Andrews does too. As above, Human Sciences might be a good choice if you're mostly interested in human geography, but if you prefer physical geography then perhaps something like Palaeobiology or UCL's Natural Sciences degree (where you can specialise in Earth, Environment, Genetics and Evolution) would suit you better.

There are all kinds of degree options, it's just a matter of doing research to find the one that's best for you.
2
reply
returnmigrant
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
Just be aware that a JH isnt 'two degrees' - you will only take half the usual units from each subject. This can often be frustrating.

You might find a 'combined' named course a better fit than pick-and-mix combos. Couple of examples :

Environmental Biology : http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy/...l-biology.aspx

Human Geography with Environmental Studies :http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/human...mental-studies
1
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
Following from Snufkin's comment, my recommendation was primarily based on the view of geography as a human centred social science; I hadn't actually considered the other side

If you are interested in physical geography and the sciences broadly, the natural progression would be to geology and earth sciences oriented courses. Many of these also have links to biosciences inherently, even on single honours e.g. through evolution and palaeobiology options in geology focused courses, or in more general earth sciences courses various ecology and marine biology oriented courses may be available. You may also be interested in Environmental Sciences courses in relation to the above.

If the this route is of interest, then besides some more specialised palaeobiology courses (such as at Brighton and Birmingham) the various Natural Sciences degrees including the UCL one snufkin mentioned are well worth looking into. Cambridge is the prototypical example from which the others followed, and has a great degree of flexibility throughout the program to pick up or drop different areas in the sciences. Additionally, although not made clear on the actual prospectus type entry page, if your interests do end up running more towards the human sciences area, you can do Part III (final year) in Biological Anthropology as well as the standard options.

Some NatSci courses do include geography as a specific area rather than geology/earth sciences as well. Southampton's course is fairly nonspecific about what areas you take modules in, and Birmingham's includes Geography as a stream as I recall.
1
reply
Ryan CS
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Following from Snufkin's comment, my recommendation was primarily based on the view of geography as a human centred social science; I hadn't actually considered the other side

If you are interested in physical geography and the sciences broadly, the natural progression would be to geology and earth sciences oriented courses. Many of these also have links to biosciences inherently, even on single honours e.g. through evolution and palaeobiology options in geology focused courses, or in more general earth sciences courses various ecology and marine biology oriented courses may be available. You may also be interested in Environmental Sciences courses in relation to the above.

If the this route is of interest, then besides some more specialised palaeobiology courses (such as at Brighton and Birmingham) the various Natural Sciences degrees including the UCL one snufkin mentioned are well worth looking into. Cambridge is the prototypical example from which the others followed, and has a great degree of flexibility throughout the program to pick up or drop different areas in the sciences. Additionally, although not made clear on the actual prospectus type entry page, if your interests do end up running more towards the human sciences area, you can do Part III (final year) in Biological Anthropology as well as the standard options.

Some NatSci courses do include geography as a specific area rather than geology/earth sciences as well. Southampton's course is fairly nonspecific about what areas you take modules in, and Birmingham's includes Geography as a stream as I recall.
(Original post by Snufkin)
If you are interested in both subjects then a joint honours degree is the perfect option. I know Durham does a Natural Sciences degree where you can specialise in Biology and Geography (see here), and I think St Andrews does too. As above, Human Sciences might be a good choice if you're mostly interested in human geography, but if you prefer physical geography then perhaps something like Palaeobiology or UCL's Natural Sciences degree (where you can specialise in Earth, Environment, Genetics and Evolution) would suit you better.

There are all kinds of degree options, it's just a matter of doing research to find the one that's best for you.
Thank you, this has been really helpful. and has given me food for thought. I'll look through the suggestions and see if any of these have some appeal to me (as I am quite interested in various parts of both of the subjects e.g. Physical an Human Aspects of geography and Human biology). Thank again for the suggestions
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How would you feel if uni students needed to be double vaccinated to start in Autumn?

I'd feel reassured about my own health (27)
17.53%
I'd feel reassured my learning may be less disrupted by isolations/lockdowns (49)
31.82%
I'd feel less anxious about being around large groups (14)
9.09%
I don't mind if others are vaccinated or not (16)
10.39%
I'm concerned it may disadvantage some students (7)
4.55%
I think it's an unfair expectation (38)
24.68%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (3)
1.95%

Watched Threads

View All