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    (Original post by englishstudent)
    Nice atricle

    I reckon Cambridge should choose on a purely academic basis.

    Having said that a first from Cambridge means nothing if you don't do anything apart from work.
    RUBBISH

    Anyone who sets their mind to it can get the grades, but it won't make them any good. When you get to uni and the freedom it entails (remember for most people this is their first tiem from home, no parents etc) then your grades may slip somewhat, you'll take part in more socialising etc.
    In those cases it'll be much better to have a student who had £as and a B but also played rugby, football and did DofE/charity work than someone who spent all their time working.
    I mean which shows better time management.
    Which infers greater intelligence
    Which is tuer to life.
    If cambridge started churning out brainy but socially retarded graduates then employers would look elsewhere.
    Anyone that has been to a modern interview for a job will know the onus on teamworking and communication.
    I'm not saying that the best academically will always be introvert, but your social and communication skills will be higher if you take part in group activities regulary.
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    (Original post by shiny)
    Our version of a GPA > 3.8 (?)
    It's not really the same though, because GPA's assess continuous achievement, and from the impression I've got on the board, most people just seem to cram a week before the exams. Or maybe I'm just not seeing a fair representation of the Cambridge students here.

    (Original post by Helenia)
    No - they're trying to get rid of their elitist image, and (quite rightly, I think) admit purely on merit. You should not be able to buy your way in.
    Although the money problems they're facing seem to suggest the American universities are winning the war to attract the best English-speaking academics, even if not the moral high ground.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    It's not really the same though, because GPA's assess continuous achievement, and from the impression I've got on the board, most people just seem to cram a week before the exams. Or maybe I'm just not seeing a fair representation of the Cambridge students here.
    Well yeah, but it's the closest thing we got so there you go.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Yeah, I'm going nowhere :rolleyes:
    OK don't take me too literally; for good professions such as medicine and teaching it doesn't matter a bit, just because the number of qualified students matches / is slightly below the demand for those sectors. But for professions where it's very competitive - this is the majority, including law, finance, marketing, media, human resources, IT etc, there's a glut of people with 2.1s, so even an Oxbridge 2.1 on its own means jack over someone with a 2.1 from a top 20/30 uni who can demonstrate they'll be good in the workplace (leadership, teamwork, communication etc etc).

    I'll leave you with a couple of quotes from UKL's Matthew, who's just entered one of the most prestigious barrister chambers despite getting a low 3rd in his finals.
    "Getting a 1st class in History just means that you're good at writing History essays"
    "You may find someone with a 1st from Oxbridge in the dole queue, but you'll never find a Union officer there"...
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    (Original post by foolfarian)
    RUBBISH

    Anyone who sets their mind to it can get the grades, but it won't make them any good. When you get to uni and the freedom it entails (remember for most people this is their first tiem from home, no parents etc) then your grades may slip somewhat, you'll take part in more socialising etc.
    In those cases it'll be much better to have a student who had £as and a B but also played rugby, football and did DofE/charity work than someone who spent all their time working.
    I mean which shows better time management.
    Which infers greater intelligence
    Which is tuer to life.
    If cambridge started churning out brainy but socially retarded graduates then employers would look elsewhere.
    Anyone that has been to a modern interview for a job will know the onus on teamworking and communication.
    I'm not saying that the best academically will always be introvert, but your social and communication skills will be higher if you take part in group activities regulary.
    Fact
    J
    There are plenty of people at Cambridge who are sociable, have other interests and are hard working I am sure.

    But the point I am making is that when a candidate is sitting in his or her interview she should not be judged on her interest in D of E, her hours of voluntary service or indeed her ability to cook chocolate chip brownies. The only thing she should be judged on (and compared with other candidates by) is her talent, aptitude and potential for her chosen academic subject.

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    (Original post by englishstudent)
    But the point I am making is that when a candidate is sitting in his or her interview she should not be judged on her interest in D of E, her hours of voluntary service or indeed her ability to cook chocolate chip brownies. The only thing she should be judged on (and compared with other candidates by) is her talent, aptitude and potential for her chosen academic subject.
    Who would a Cambridge college prefer, a hardcore-academic antisocial gimp who does nothing but work, gets a high 1st and ends up in some crap job due to a lack of essential skills, or someone who balances getting a 2.1 with motivation and drive elsewhere, subsequently becoming very prolific and a credit to the college, present and future?
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Who would a Cambridge college prefer, a hardcore-academic antisocial gimp who does nothing but work, gets a high 1st and ends up in some crap job due to a lack of essential skills, or someone who balances getting a 2.1 with motivation and drive elsewhere, subsequently becoming very prolific and a credit to the college, present and future?
    i know some companies who intentionally look for super-geeks!
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    (Original post by shiny)
    i know some companies who intentionally look for super-geeks!
    Yeah, companies want super-geeks to work behind the scenes. But never for them to be the 'face' of the organisation who interacts with clients.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Who would a Cambridge college prefer, a hardcore-academic antisocial gimp who does nothing but work, gets a high 1st and ends up in some crap job due to a lack of essential skills, or someone who balances getting a 2.1 with motivation and drive elsewhere, subsequently becoming very prolific and a credit to the college, present and future?
    personally, i think therein lies the difference between cambridge colleges - some would go for the antisocial gimp-genius, others would go for the 2.1 party animal. (check out the stereotypes - this is frighteningly close to a few... )

    after all, you do see both types around town, so it means that both types have been admitted, maybe to different colleges, but admitted to the uni nonetheless...

    (BTW, gimps do not always get crap jobs. many "hardcore academics", including some teaching us, can be considered to be less socially savvy than their contemporaries/counterparts...)
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Yeah, companies want super-geeks to work behind the scenes. But never for them to be the 'face' of the organisation who interacts with clients.
    yeah but not everyone can be the face of an organisation and in the end you still need people to knuckle down and do the hard work, no amount of talk and presentation is going to build you a skyscraper or a new super-duper computer system! variety is good!

    Long live the geeks!
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    (Original post by KHL)
    (BTW, gimps do not always get crap jobs. many "hardcore academics", including some teaching us, can be considered to be less socially savvy than their contemporaries/counterparts...)
    I didn't say all of them do. You just need to look at Bill Gates
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    i'd like to think that cambridge has enough room for all sorts of different people! life is much more interesting that way!
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    (Original post by shiny)
    no amount of talk and presentation is going to build you a skyscraper
    Since when are architects supposed to be geeks?
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Since when are architects supposed to be geeks?
    architects design, civvie engineers build and not all of them are mr charming
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    Look, the Cambridge professors themselves are where they are because of a total passion for their subject (and usually even more detailed areas within the subject).

    Some may lack the charisma to be the "face" of an organisation, others may not (and yet have chosen to become academics).

    I promise you that when Cambridge hire academics they couldn't care less whether the candidate enjoys going bike-riding at the weekend. They want someone who loves/knows about their subject. Ditto for students applying to Cambridge.
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    (Original post by englishstudent)
    Look, the Cambridge professors themselves are where they are because of a total passion for their subject (and usually even more detailed areas within the subject).

    Some may lack the charisma to be the "face" of an organisation, others may not (and yet have chosen to become academics).
    How many Cambridge graduates go into a career in academia though? I'm talking about the 'typical' sectors where the majority of Tabs go into. As I've said for education and medicine, extracurriculars mean nothing.
    (Original post by englishstudent)
    I promise you that when Cambridge hire academics they couldn't care less whether the candidate enjoys going bike-riding at the weekend. They want someone who loves/knows about their subject. Ditto for students applying to Cambridge.
    Again for academics, yes. For students, it depends very much on the admissions tutor in question, but you don't see many getting through with a multitude of A grades if their UCAS statement is practically blank.

    Though as discussed previously on this forum, academic credentials matter a lot more for Maths and Sciences, whereas for the Arts extracurriculars can be influential.
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    [QUOTE=Jools]

    you don't see many getting through with a multitude of A grades if their UCAS statement is practically blank.

    QUOTE]

    I managed to fill all but 30 words of my personal statement with my interest in English Lit. (Of course I do other things as well but for Cam I didn't feel they were relevant). In my opinion admissions look for people with academic potential. That's it.
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    (Original post by englishstudent)
    I managed to fill all but 30 words of my personal statement with my interest in English Lit. (Of course I do other things as well but for Cam I didn't feel they were relevant). In my opinion admissions look for people with academic potential. That's it.
    That's just based on your experience though which may not exactly reflect all the other 3,000+ who got accepted; the majority who get accepted do the standard statement - one paragraph on why they like their subject, one on their academic studies, and one on extracurriculars.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    That's just based on your experience though which may not exactly reflect all the other 3,000+ who got accepted; the majority who get accepted do the standard statement - one paragraph on why they like their subject, one on their academic studies, and one on extracurriculars.
    Perhaps. But it would suprise me. At the end of the day, it's gonna be read by tutors in that subject.

    I don't see why Cambridge would care if I did windsurfing on a Saturday morning or not in relation to my ability in English Lit. Surely the two are unrelated.

    Nowhere in any material I have read from Cambridge does it say that students are judged on their extra-curricular habits. The words "academic potential" are brought up often however.

    As such, the personal statement should be geared towards academics rather than any other interests.
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    (Original post by englishstudent)
    I don't see why Cambridge would care if I did windsurfing on a Saturday morning or not in relation to my ability in English Lit. Surely the two are unrelated.
    Let's just assume there's 3 candidates per place applying for English at a certain college. All of them have AAAA, all of them got 100% in a module or 2 or English/Lit, and all of them evidently have a great passion for English Literature. All will be a pleasure to teach and all will be capable of getting a 1st/good 2.1. So then what do you use to differentiate between them? How about evidence that they have good time management skills, so will not struggle academically if they take on other things at Cambridge? Or evidence that they have other skills that will mean they'll be successful?
    (Original post by englishstudent)
    Nowhere in any material I have read from Cambridge does it say that students are judged on their extra-curricular habits. The words "academic potential" are brought up often however.
    Perhaps extracurriculars have a much greater emphasis at Oxford then.
 
 
 

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