Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MadNatSci)
    God, how did I get in? I haven't done sport since I was about 14!
    Hehe, I was thinking the same. He's right about the observation though. I was forced to do sport until 6th form, but I would not call myself sporty!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Invisible)
    Guess what: Someone with Eton who has practically bought 10 A Grades at GCSE and has paid thousands to have extra currics fed to him on a plate, will automatically get an Oxbridge place over a doubley enthusiastic, more motivated and determined, much more academically able person with 10 A's from a shocking state school with terrible environment/teaching/academic record/local area/parentla income etc who has fewer extra currics because there is far less opportunity?
    Not necessarily. The Head Boy of Eton was rejected last year!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Invisible)
    Guess what: Someone with Eton who has practically bought 10 A Grades at GCSE and has paid thousands to have extra currics fed to him on a plate, will automatically get an Oxbridge place over a doubley enthusiastic, more motivated and determined, much more academically able person with 10 A's from a shocking state school with terrible environment/teaching/academic record/local area/parentla income etc who has fewer extra currics because there is far less opportunity?
    The first couple of times we heard this it was mildly amusing...now it's mildly pathetic.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Invisible)
    How much did he offer for bribing? Not enough ehh?
    Seriously man, get over yourself
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Invisible)
    How much did he offer for bribing? Not enough ehh?
    Consider this. That lad might have been a really nice guy, might have spent his time helping the homeless etc. But because his parents were rich enough to want to try to give him the best start in life, and he dared apply to the top uni you get all *****y on his ass.
    T'is a symptom of a bored existence.
    J
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by foolfarian)
    Consider this. That lad might have been a really nice guy, might have spent his time helping the homeless etc. But because his parents were rich enough to want to try to give him the best start in life, and he dared apply to the top uni you get all *****y on his ass.
    T'is a symptom of a bored existence.
    J
    I agree. I mean how naive is it to lump all public school people into that stereotype?

    Whenever I read those comments I'm overwhelmed by the notion that these people are jealous.

    I am not saying I want elitist educational systems; I don't. I am left wing in my political outlook. But to suggest that someone's (basically) a **** for having money is unfair.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by englishstudent)
    Whenever I read those comments I'm overwhelmed by the notion that these people are jealous.
    But...jealousy's when you envy someone and maybe would want to be in their shoes; I'd think the majority of state schoolers would not want to be who they deem as poncey snobbish provincial mummy's boys.

    Invisible, why do you have such a chip on your shoulder? As everyone's said its completely unfair to discriminate against an individual for being at private school - it's not their fault their parents are rich (and in a lot of cases they're not and making a big sacrifice for their children). They do take background into some consideration - at Bristol someone with ABB from a failing school with few opportunities to do stuff will probably be on par with a 5A DofE Gold Etonian. As for Oxford...

    State schoolers make up 47.6% of acceptances and 46.9% of offers
    Private schoolers make up 36.1% of acceptances and 43.9% of offers
    Others 16.3 / 9.2

    If everyone was considered equal concerning their background and opportunities they had then it'd be about 80% private getting offers. (Incidentally I'm from a state school)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jools)
    I've said repeatedly on this thread that academic merit is the prerequisite first hurdle, and when you're then whittled down to the top academic calibre the 'secondary' stuff starts to count. It's still utterly wrong to say that the only thing they're looking for is academic potential, and certain colleges are being misleading in explicitly saying this.

    Skills you can learn playing squash: Motivation to succeed and 'be the best', not quit in the face of demanding competition, strategy, concentration, alertness, etc. In theory all of these are transferable skills to an academic course, though obviously being a motivated squash player doesn't mean you're guaranteed to excel in the classroom. Tutors just have to take a guess, though if their past record shows they're academically successful and a sports champion it would suggest they have the motivation to 'be the best' in whatever field. Also note that regarding what type you do, anything you do can demonstrate useful skills - as crana pointed out, this doesn't have to be sport/music/drama, but looking after siblings, a relationship etc.

    They don't 100% prove anything, but they can be a useful indicator.

    Rather than bother to repeat myself in the hopes that Englishstudent will realise that I intended to criticise his rather narrow perspective, not to mention his shallow reading of the prospectus, I will quote the above as it is word for word the answer I would have given.
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Jools)
    But...jealousy's when you envy someone and maybe would want to be in their shoes; I'd think the majority of state schoolers would not want to be who they deem as poncey snobbish provincial mummy's boys.

    Invisible, why do you have such a chip on your shoulder? As everyone's said its completely unfair to discriminate against an individual for being at private school - it's not their fault their parents are rich (and in a lot of cases they're not and making a big sacrifice for their children). They do take background into some consideration - at Bristol someone with ABB from a failing school with few opportunities to do stuff will probably be on par with a 5A DofE Gold Etonian. As for Oxford...

    State schoolers make up 47.6% of acceptances and 46.9% of offers
    Private schoolers make up 36.1% of acceptances and 43.9% of offers
    Others 16.3 / 9.2

    If everyone was considered equal concerning their background and opportunities they had then it'd be about 80% private getting offers. (Incidentally I'm from a state school)
    Balls, anyone who went toa **** school (which lets face it many state schools are) would want to have gone to a private school. I mean to have been able to use computers at school, to be able to play fun sports like squash, basketball, lacroose, hockey instead of fricking football (like footie and all, but playing it every dinner time and then only having it available in games as well as table tennis is a bit cruddy.

    thats the only reason id have liked it though - just to have had better facilities, sports and teachers - hence more fun.
    J
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by foolfarian)
    Balls, anyone who went toa **** school (which lets face it many state schools are) would want to have gone to a private school. I mean to have been able to use computers at school, to be able to play fun sports like squash, basketball, lacroose, hockey instead of fricking football (like footie and all, but playing it every dinner time and then only having it available in games as well as table tennis is a bit cruddy.

    thats the only reason id have liked it though - just to have had better facilities, sports and teachers - hence more fun.
    J
    I should rephrase - most people who want a good education and wants to do well for themselves (educationally/financially etc) who went to a **** school may have wanted to have gone to a private. If I had the choice I'd probably have preferred it, but was not in the slightest bit envious of the cohords of briefcase-carrying Latin-quipping kids I saw walking to the grammar school every day.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    HANG ON!!!!!!!!!! I've just read the article... and... does this guy have any sort of psychological difficulties? I mean is his IQ standard? If so... WHAT UNIVERSITY WOULD ADMIT HIM???? and he applied to cambridge???? i mean... the university did 100% correct in not accepting him!!! and the mcdonalds guy said it was unfair!!! I just cant believe this! I mean... did he get to the interview. I'm so surprised :eek:
    Well... form my point of view.. without AAA or AAB do not apply to cambridge... and apart formt hat extra curricular things are taken into account but you must have at least AAB if not... (i mean in A2) rejected!!! I mean you can have ABBC at AS coz that could be improved... but ... well I'm SOOOOO SHOCKED! i'm... well.... cambridge is one of the BEST UNIVERSITIES IN THE WORLD. how on hell are they taken into account people with Es? I think the article is absolutally STUPID!!! Can someone tell me what is has shown to you?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kitsune)
    Can someone tell me what is has shown to you?
    That you are gullible and aren't familiar with satirical journalism?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Heh I just read the article

    How did this thread get so serious?: D
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jools)
    That you are gullible and aren't familiar with satirical journalism?
    oh!!! british humour!!! can someone understand it apart from the british? (actually i think it's english becuase acaila didnt got the ironic meaning of it -she's scottish :P)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Errrr......oooooooookay :confused:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by foolfarian)
    Balls, anyone who went toa **** school (which lets face it many state schools are) would want to have gone to a private school. I mean to have been able to use computers at school, to be able to play fun sports like squash, basketball, lacroose, hockey instead of fricking football (like footie and all, but playing it every dinner time and then only having it available in games as well as table tennis is a bit cruddy.

    thats the only reason id have liked it though - just to have had better facilities, sports and teachers - hence more fun.
    J
    If by '**** school' you mean inner-city, failing, watch-out for-the-gangs with-guns sort (forgive the stereotype) then yes. However, my school was a pretty bad comprehensive and I think I can honestly say that the skills I gained by having to 'duck and dive' (as one does in such a diverse and often extremely challenging environment) were the making of me. Obviously this isn't the case for everyone but a state comp environment brought out the best, where as I believe local, competitive public schools in which all the students have a similar background would have been stifling. Having looked round several public schools it seemed that the ones in my area 'spoon fed to win' with no room to develop personal approaches. If I could turn back the clock I wouldn't change it - despite having rubbish facilities. So I'll never be captain of the boat club, but I got in...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    yeh fair point- but why learn with the **** of the earth when you can learn with other people of your ability and learn from them! Why have ********s in your class that are just going to draw attention from teaching!?
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Haz)
    If by '**** school' you mean inner-city, failing, watch-out for-the-gangs with-guns sort (forgive the stereotype) then yes. However, my school was a pretty bad comprehensive and I think I can honestly say that the skills I gained by having to 'duck and dive' (as one does in such a diverse and often extremely challenging environment) were the making of me. Obviously this isn't the case for everyone but a state comp environment brought out the best, where as I believe local, competitive public schools in which all the students have a similar background would have been stifling. Having looked round several public schools it seemed that the ones in my area 'spoon fed to win' with no room to develop personal approaches. If I could turn back the clock I wouldn't change it - despite having rubbish facilities. So I'll never be captain of the boat club, but I got in...
    Mine was similar (not bad school but certainly had serious scrapes etc) but i don't think i can really say if i gained anything from that environment i wouldn't have in a more friendly one.
    cept a more distrusting attitute and realisation that kids are shits.
    J
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by foolfarian)
    Mine was similar (not bad school but certainly had serious scrapes etc) but i don't think i can really say if i gained anything from that environment i wouldn't have in a more friendly one.
    cept a more distrusting attitute and realisation that kids are shits.
    J
    Definately, but I think one is just as likely to come across 'shits' in public schools - just different kinds of shits... The setting system made sure that classes wern't too disrupted and it wasn't on the whole an unfriendly school. It did, however, have an extremely diverse range of people and one wouldn't usually find that at a public school. True, that particular experience is something that's particularly important to me (anthropologist) but it can provide anyone with some very useful social and 'life' skills.

    And Faa - trust me, you can learn a hell of a lot from those you refer to as "the **** of the earth". You look at those kids who disrupt classes and sell drugs etc, learn about their home life and then get a job in the benefit agency and listen to them beg you for money because they have 5 kids and are unemployable. Please don't dismiss this as a leftie rant, my only point was that much of the incredibly valuable learning that goes on in comprehensive schools is not academic - it happens through socialising with people with completely different experiences to oneself.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Haz)
    Definately, but I think one is just as likely to come across 'shits' in public schools - just different kinds of shits... The setting system made sure that classes wern't too disrupted and it wasn't on the whole an unfriendly school. It did, however, have an extremely diverse range of people and one wouldn't usually find that at a public school. True, that particular experience is something that's particularly important to me (anthropologist) but it can provide anyone with some very useful social and 'life' skills.

    And Faa - trust me, you can learn a hell of a lot from those you refer to as "the **** of the earth". You look at those kids who disrupt classes and sell drugs etc, learn about their home life and then get a job in the benefit agency and listen to them beg you for money because they have 5 kids and are unemployable. Please don't dismiss this as a leftie rant, my only point was that much of the incredibly valuable learning that goes on in comprehensive schools is not academic - it happens through socialising with people with completely different experiences to oneself.
    i'm not sure i would agree completely with that, but i do take offence at the assumption that comprehensive students would rather have gone to private school. it's a bit cheesy to say it's "living in the real world" for a bit but i do think i was better off having gone through a comp. i don't mean to devalue the achievements of anyone at private schools, but i do think doing my a levels at a comp (where a lot of the teaching was pitched at trying to just pass rather than get top grades) meant that i had to lean to work independently - which is quite handy for university
 
 
 
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.