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    (Original post by amateurish)
    i'm not sure i would agree completely with that, but i do take offence at the assumption that comprehensive students would rather have gone to private school. it's a bit cheesy to say it's "living in the real world" for a bit but i do think i was better off having gone through a comp. i don't mean to devalue the achievements of anyone at private schools, but i do think doing my a levels at a comp (where a lot of the teaching was pitched at trying to just pass rather than get top grades) meant that i had to lean to work independently - which is quite handy for university
    Yeah but it's the same in a non-selective state school - in English for example we had a range from A to E in the year. It's not as though private school teaching is all about ensuring top A grades all round.

    I worked independantly to get a top grade too.
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    (Original post by Jools)
    But...jealousy's when you envy someone and maybe would want to be in their shoes; I'd think the majority of state schoolers would not want to be who they deem as poncey snobbish provincial mummy's boys.
    Come on Jools, if Eton knock on 100 12 year old kids door tomorrow offering full scholarships, you've got to accept that the vast majority of them will be on the next train to Windsor. There's nothing wrong with kids seaking the best edcuation for themselves, and there's certainly nothing wrong with parents wanting to offer the best education for their children.
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    (Original post by Haz)
    And Faa - trust me, you can learn a hell of a lot from those you refer to as "the **** of the earth". You look at those kids who disrupt classes and sell drugs etc, learn about their home life and then get a job in the benefit agency and listen to them beg you for money because they have 5 kids and are unemployable. Please don't dismiss this as a leftie rant, my only point was that much of the incredibly valuable learning that goes on in comprehensive schools is not academic - it happens through socialising with people with completely different experiences to oneself.
    It certainly appears that you actually got more from treating the "**** of the earth" in your comp as a platform for your own observations of a certain section of society rather than learning from them; as valuable as your observations and experiences may well be for examining the failures and successes of the state education system reflected on its students I'm not really too sure what you claim to have drawn from it.

    I would imagine that we would misrepresent the actual case severely if we suggest that there is any less a diversity of experiences in any independent / public school as compared to any comps. I've no doubt mixing with those who have trying personal circumstances does develop your social skills in a certain direction. However, I would urge you not to make the mistake of believing that a lack of trying circumstances in one's peers necessarily implies that one stands to gain less from the educational experience in the private sector as compared to the state sector.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Come on Jools, if Eton knock on 100 12 year old kids door tomorrow offering full scholarships, you've got to accept that the vast majority of them will be on the next train to Windsor. There's nothing wrong with kids seaking the best edcuation for themselves, and there's certainly nothing wrong with parents wanting to offer the best education for their children.
    Didn't say there was anything wrong with kids and parents wanting the very best, I'm drawing on the stereotypes of what a lot of people think public schoolboys are ("Oops, I dropped my soap..."). If Eton offered 100 'average/typical' inner city kids full scholarships, I'd actually reckon the majority would want to stay where they are, with their mates, close to their family and not want to take a train to Windsor to be surrounded by who they'll perceive to be male-only white-only posh snobbish geeky wusses*. Similarly you get a lot of talented 'working class' people who wouldn't consider Oxbridge, even if it was all-expenses paid. There seem to be only few who want to work themselves upwards and outwards, up the socioeconomic ladder, many seem perfectly content where they currently stand.

    *I said typical inner city kid, not typical state-schooler...
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Didn't say there was anything wrong with kids and parents wanting the very best, I'm drawing on the stereotypes of what a lot of people think public schoolboys are ("Oops, I dropped my soap..."). If Eton offered 100 'average/typical' inner city kids full scholarships, I'd actually reckon the majority would want to stay where they are, with their mates, close to their family and not want to take a train to Windsor to be surrounded by who they'll perceive to be male-only white-only posh snobbish geeky wusses*. Similarly you get a lot of talented 'working class' people who wouldn't consider Oxbridge, even if it was all-expenses paid. There seem to be only few who want to work themselves upwards and outwards, up the socioeconomic ladder, many seem perfectly content where they currently stand.

    *I said typical inner city kid, not typical state-schooler...
    I think yes, it is important, to recognise that Education is not the prime motivation for a lot people our age from more deprived areas.
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    (Original post by aliel)
    I think yes, it is important, to recognise that Education is not the prime motivation for a lot people our age from more deprived areas.
    Exactly. "Do your homework and I'll break your face". "Oh my God he's revising for a test, I wouldn't dare". "What's the point in getting As and Bs, do you think you're too good for the rest of us?" Those are all word to word quotes I've heard at a good state school. So then...

    "Would you like a fully-paid scholarship to Eton?"
    "I wouldn't dare if you paid me"
    "But you'll get excellent grades, an excellent well-paid job and be very successful"
    "I wouldn't want to be like one of you posh c*nts..."
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    (Original post by Jools)
    Didn't say there was anything wrong with kids and parents wanting the very best, I'm drawing on the stereotypes of what a lot of people think public schoolboys are ("Oops, I dropped my soap..."). If Eton offered 100 'average/typical' inner city kids full scholarships, I'd actually reckon the majority would want to stay where they are, with their mates, close to their family and not want to take a train to Windsor to be surrounded by who they'll perceive to be male-only white-only posh snobbish geeky wusses*. Similarly you get a lot of talented 'working class' people who wouldn't consider Oxbridge, even if it was all-expenses paid. There seem to be only few who want to work themselves upwards and outwards, up the socioeconomic ladder, many seem perfectly content where they currently stand.

    *I said typical inner city kid, not typical state-schooler...
    It easy to say that as a hypothetical, but it the offer was on the table, I think a majority of state schoolers would jump at the chance. As for Oxbridge; I know people have their own reasons for no wanting to apply, fairly enough; but genuinely, I think it comes back to a fear of rejection in most cases. Think about it, they're at a middling comprehensive, got pretty good GCSEs (all As/Bs, maybe the odd A* thrown in if they're lucky) without stretching themselves to any great extent, hiding behind the fact it's a comp so obviously they're getting beaten-up everyday and the teachers are never there. Now, after ASs they got, say AABB (thus going to be predicted AAAA), putting them well within the Oxbridge bracket, but they don't apply. Could be multiple reasons: might not like either oxford or Cambridge, might be too expensive, or in their warped imagination Oxbridge is full of snobs. Or, (and this goes for state and private, in fact) they've had it easy at their school, been seen to be very intelligent, something really special; so why risk it applying to somewhere where standard are really high, when they could just go to Leicester or Bath instead. Both good, top 20 universities; they're got their reasons for not applying to Oxbridge already sorted so no one can question them, and they don't have to risk anything in the process.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Think about it, they're at a middling comprehensive, got pretty good GCSEs (all As/Bs, maybe the odd A* thrown in if they're lucky) without stretching themselves to any great extent, hiding behind the fact it's a comp so obviously they're getting beaten-up everyday and the teachers are never there.
    Is the comment about getting beaten-up/absent teachers sarcasm?
 
 
 
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