Maths After A-levels

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username2021515
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#1
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#1
Hi guys, before applying to university I knew I'd end up having to choose between maths and science.After much deliberation I decide that a degree in physics would be most suitable for me.
However, I am also deeply passionate about maths and have decided that independantly study the subject- more as a hobby than anthing else
Although, I feel this is possible I don't what topics would usually be studied beyond A level which is why I need some advice.
The topics I am most intetested in are mechanics and pure mathematics.
I have completed all mechanics modules M1-5 and all core maths modules C1-FP3 if this is of any use.
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Gem Thief
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#2
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#2
No option for a joint degree?

Surely a Physics degree would have some kind of optional mechanics module?

You said just "Physics" so I'm assuming it's a degree in general Physics or whatever it's called.
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username2694731
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Sapereaude45)
Hi guys, before applying to university I knew I'd end up having to choose between maths and science.After much deliberation I decide that a degree in physics would be most suitable for me.
However, I am also deeply passionate about maths and have decided that independantly study the subject- more as a hobby than anthing else
Although, I feel this is possible I don't what topics would usually be studied beyond A level which is why I need some advice.
The topics I am most intetested in are mechanics and pure mathematics.
I have completed all mechanics modules M1-5 and all core maths modules C1-FP3 if this is of any use.
Uni option modules?, as they should be open to you and you should have the probable requirement ( A level maths)
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username2021515
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#4
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I'm pretty sure my course does have the option of taking mechanics modules.However, when it comes to pure maths options there really isn't much.However, I should be able to teach myself it's just I don't know where to begin.What topics would ypu typically learn in a first year maths course and what books would you recommend.It'll give me something to do on and off over the summer.
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username2694731
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#5
(Original post by Sapereaude45)
I'm pretty sure my course does have the option of taking mechanics modules.However, when it comes to pure maths options there really isn't much.However, I should be able to teach myself it's just I don't know where to begin.What topics would ypu typically learn in a first year maths course and what books would you recommend.It'll give me something to do on and off over the summer.
What institution are you going to study Physics at?, so I can find/give you better advice.
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ihatePE
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(Original post by Sapereaude45)
I'm pretty sure my course does have the option of taking mechanics modules.However, when it comes to pure maths options there really isn't much.However, I should be able to teach myself it's just I don't know where to begin.What topics would ypu typically learn in a first year maths course and what books would you recommend.It'll give me something to do on and off over the summer.
for ''mechanics'' post A levels, i would recommend getting Engineering mathematics by K.A stroud, it covers some of degree level maths and the lay out of the book is easy to follow.
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username2021515
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(Original post by DreamlinerFinder)
What institution are you going to study Physics at?, so I can find/give you better advice.
Durham or Imperial college, depending on my results
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username2021515
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(Original post by ihatePE)
for ''mechanics'' post A levels, i would recommend getting Engineering mathematics by K.A stroud, it covers some of degree level maths and the lay out of the book is easy to follow.
Looks good, I'll be sure to look into it!Do you have any other books you'd recommend?
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username2694731
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(Original post by Sapereaude45)
Durham or Imperial college, depending on my results
Have a look at the two links below:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mathematic...e-and-content/

https://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/facu...works/g103.pdf ( this is for 2016, so may not be indicative)
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username2021515
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(Original post by Gem Thief)
No option for a joint degree?

Surely a Physics degree would have some kind of optional mechanics module?

You said just "Physics" so I'm assuming it's a degree in general Physics or whatever it's called.
It's really only general for the first and second year, but becomes extremely specialized during third and fourth year.For example, if you decide to study theoretical physics or particle physics.
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ihatePE
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(Original post by Sapereaude45)
Looks good, I'll be sure to look into it!Do you have any other books you'd recommend?
not at the moment, but if you look through a maths degree on a uni site, go on the module list, it should list the modules/specification/topics as well as ''background material'' which basically tell you what books to read to complete the module.
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(Original post by DreamlinerFinder)
Have a look at the two links below:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk/mathematic...e-and-content/

https://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/facu...works/g103.pdf ( this is for 2016, so may not be indicative)
This is great.There seems to be a lot of crossover with the topics in phsics.I should be able to take these as option modules.
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(Original post by ihatePE)
not at the moment, but if you look through a maths degree on a uni site, go on the module list, it should list the modules/specification/topics as well as ''background material'' which basically tell you what books to read to complete the module.
Excellent, I'll check it out!
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jcm420
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(Original post by Sapereaude45)
Hi guys, before applying to university I knew I'd end up having to choose between maths and science.After much deliberation I decide that a degree in physics would be most suitable for me.
However, I am also deeply passionate about maths and have decided that independantly study the subject- more as a hobby than anthing else
Although, I feel this is possible I don't what topics would usually be studied beyond A level which is why I need some advice.
The topics I am most intetested in are mechanics and pure mathematics.
I have completed all mechanics modules M1-5 and all core maths modules C1-FP3 if this is of any use.
C1-FP3?????? surely thats enough maths lad 😂😂
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username2694731
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(Original post by Sapereaude45)
This is great.There seems to be a lot of crossover with the topics in phsics.I should be able to take these as option modules.
Depends, but I'll link the physics ones below:
https://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/facu...works/f301.pdf
http://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/ug/c.../physics-msci/
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Zacken
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#16
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(Original post by Sapereaude45)
Hi guys, before applying to university I knew I'd end up having to choose between maths and science.After much deliberation I decide that a degree in physics would be most suitable for me.
However, I am also deeply passionate about maths and have decided that independantly study the subject- more as a hobby than anthing else
Although, I feel this is possible I don't what topics would usually be studied beyond A level which is why I need some advice.
The topics I am most intetested in are mechanics and pure mathematics.
I have completed all mechanics modules M1-5 and all core maths modules C1-FP3 if this is of any use.
A first year course in maths would typically take you through some very basic number and set theory, and the idea of proof. Working the way up to proving and using fermat-euler, chinese remainder theorem and quadratic residues. A section on countability and cardinality of sets.

It would cover some basic linear algebra, covering the idea of vector spaces, some basic theorems about those, linear maps and their matrix representations and their eigenvalue/eigenvector concepts.

Some stuff on differential equations, from basic A-Level stuff to some multivariable calculus and a bit about PDE's.

A course on group theory, building from the basic axioms on groups to lagranges theorem, introducing group actions, orbit stabiliser theorem and its various applications.

A basic real analysis course, constructing the real numbers axiomatically, a treatment of limits of sequences and series, continuity and differentiability of a function and some basic riemann integrability.

A vector calculus course, covering multivariable calculus in depth, from integration in R^n, surface integrals, directional derivatives and the derivative as a linear map as well as the associated integral theorems and div,grad, curl concepts. Some stuff on Poisson and Laplace's equation and proofs of uniqueness and existence.

A mechanics course, doing mechanics properly, working with orbits and gravity as a central force, some special relativity.

A probability course, building the concept of a probability space axiomatically, introducing the various useful distributions, concept of pdf's, cdf's in the one-dimensional and multivariable case.
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username2021515
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#17
(Original post by Zacken)
A first year course in maths would typically take you through some very basic number and set theory, and the idea of proof. Working the way up to proving and using fermat-euler, chinese remainder theorem and quadratic residues. A section on countability and cardinality of sets.

It would cover some basic linear algebra, covering the idea of vector spaces, some basic theorems about those, linear maps and their matrix representations and their eigenvalue/eigenvector concepts.

Some stuff on differential equations, from basic A-Level stuff to some multivariable calculus and a bit about PDE's.

A course on group theory, building from the basic axioms on groups to lagranges theorem, introducing group actions, orbit stabiliser theorem and its various applications.

A basic real analysis course, constructing the real numbers axiomatically, a treatment of limits of sequences and series, continuity and differentiability of a function and some basic riemann integrability.

A vector calculus course, covering multivariable calculus in depth, from integration in R^n, surface integrals, directional derivatives and the derivative as a linear map as well as the associated integral theorems and div,grad, curl concepts. Some stuff on Poisson and Laplace's equation and proofs of uniqueness and existence.

A mechanics course, doing mechanics properly, working with orbits and gravity as a central force, some special relativity.

A probability course, building the concept of a probability space axiomatically, introducing the various useful distributions, concept of pdf's, cdf's in the one-dimensional and multivariable case.
Damn, all sounds quite exciting actually.I have read a book on linear algebra as I have heard that what is used as the bridge into undergraduate level mathematics.I'l probably have a read of it again over the summer.I'll probably tackle multivariable calculus next, then vector calculus.Do you have any textbooks you'd recommend for either?I was going to get the dover textbook, but they dovecieve criticism for being light on details.
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Zacken
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#18
(Original post by Sapereaude45)
Damn, all sounds quite exciting actually.I have read a book on linear algebra as I have heard that what is used as the bridge into undergraduate level mathematics.I'l probably have a read of it again over the summer.I'll probably tackle multivariable calculus next, then vector calculus.Do you have any textbooks you'd recommend for either?I was going to get the dover textbook, but they dovecieve criticism for being light on details.
I normally use lecture notes rather than textbooks, so no recommendations.
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#19
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#19
(Original post by jcm420)
C1-FP3?????? surely thats enough maths lad 😂😂
Yeah lol, I did feel that way last week with all the exam clashes from maths modules.I went home at 6:30 pm last thursday after doing a whole days worth of exams.I'm still worn out lol.
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username2021515
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#20
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(Original post by Zacken)
I normally use lecture notes rather than textbooks, so no recommendations.
No worries-the information you've given is a great template nonetheless!
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