NNB_Herath
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I have done my EDEXCEL IAL exam with Biology , Chemistry , Physics and Mathematics..
I am thinking of doing a Mechatronic Engineering undergraduate course , and I want to know whether it is a good choice with job opportunities.
I decided on it because it is somewhat a new side to explore but am not sure wheter it has sufficient jobs and whether it will be recognised in the future

Any help would be really appreciated
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999tigger
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(Original post by NNB_Herath)
I have done my EDEXCEL IAL exam with Biology , Chemistry , Physics and Mathematics..
I am thinking of doing a Mechatronic Engineering undergraduate course , and I want to know whether it is a good choice with job opportunities.
I decided on it because it is somewhat a new side to explore but am not sure wheter it has sufficient jobs and whether it will be recognised in the future

Any help would be really appreciated
Contact the universities you are interested in going into and ask them for data/ information/ stats on where there students go after their degrees. they normally keep some sort of employment stats, although it needs to be taken with a pinch of salt.

You can also look at job adverts for people with mechatronics degrees or ask a recruiter. they give a snapshot as to how in demand it is.

https://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au/...c-engineers-do

This gives you other names a mechatronics degree might go by in job adverts.

You should also join the Institute of Mechanical Engineers as an affiliate. It is free and that would give you access to the membership including mechatronic engineers.

http://www.imeche.org/membership-reg...filiate-member
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NNB_Herath
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Contact the universities you are interested in going into and ask them for data/ information/ stats on where there students go after their degrees. they normally keep some sort of employment stats, although it needs to be taken with a pinch of salt.

You can also look at job adverts for people with mechatronics degrees or ask a recruiter. they give a snapshot as to how in demand it is.

https://www.engineering.unsw.edu.au/...c-engineers-do

This gives you other names a mechatronics degree might go by in job adverts.

You should also join the Institute of Mechanical Engineers as an affiliate. It is free and that would give you access to the membership including mechatronic engineers.

http://www.imeche.org/membership-reg...filiate-member
Thank you !!
I will look for them .
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Et Tu, Brute?
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The thing about any engineering course, but more so for mechanical and electronic is that the jobs you can go into afterwards are incredibly vast. For example, with a civil engineering degree, lots of jobs across the world, but it is (somewhat, compared to mech/EE) limited to a construction related field, not always but usually that's the case.

Whereas mechanical and electronic are used in quite a lot of areas you can go into, with mechatronics, while the name implies it is a bit of a hybrid, from the course at manchester I looked at, it seems to be mostly electronics with a bit of mechanics thrown in there, and a key area that would imply to would be robotics, indeed their mechanics modules seem to focus on the robotics side of things.

Depending on what you studied, I'd say with a mechatronic degree you'll be able to get (be eligible to apply for rather) any job that asks for an electronic engineering degree, probably a lot of mechanical ones also, plus any of the jobs out there (and these are quite common place) that just ask for any engineering degree.

That said however, once you actually graduate and start applying for jobs, you'll often find the degree title itself can be somewhat irrelevant and experience/what you can do much more important. I'm not necessarily talking about work experience here, but more about how many of the boxes in the job description can you tick?

For example, lets say you graduate with a degree in mechatronics and you see a job you like which asks for a mechatronic degree, you've got all the embedded systems knowledge, the programming and digital electronics on top of the mechanics for the types of projects you'd be working on. However the job description prefers (not required) some exposure to AI and experience with CAD, but you have neither. Chances are someone out there is able to demonstrate (not necessarily purely through the degree, eg work experience etc) they have bother, in which case are at more of an advantage.

That's a bit of a moot example really since I would expect most mechatronics degrees offer some training in design/CAD anyway, but just to demonstrate a point. On the other side of the coin, probably a more likely one, is you are the person with the 'box ticking' advantage (depending on the job you applied for) as you'll have demonstrated skills across two fields of engineering, I just wanted to demonstrate the degree title itself is fairly meaningless and usually only serves as a reference so you know what kind of skills they are after, the job description is where you'd truly know if you meet the requirements or not.

In which case I disagree that you should look at jobs asking for mechatronic degrees to get an idea of the employability options, as it is still somewhat of a niche at the moment and there won't be as many asking for mechatronics as there would be for electronics or mechanical, however that doesn't mean you cannot apply for the jobs asking for electronic and/or mechanical as it will largely depend on what skills you have and what they want you to have.
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NNB_Herath
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
The thing about any engineering course, but more so for mechanical and electronic is that the jobs you can go into afterwards are incredibly vast. For example, with a civil engineering degree, lots of jobs across the world, but it is (somewhat, compared to mech/EE) limited to a construction related field, not always but usually that's the case.

Whereas mechanical and electronic are used in quite a lot of areas you can go into, with mechatronics, while the name implies it is a bit of a hybrid, from the course at manchester I looked at, it seems to be mostly electronics with a bit of mechanics thrown in there, and a key area that would imply to would be robotics, indeed their mechanics modules seem to focus on the robotics side of things.

Depending on what you studied, I'd say with a mechatronic degree you'll be able to get (be eligible to apply for rather) any job that asks for an electronic engineering degree, probably a lot of mechanical ones also, plus any of the jobs out there (and these are quite common place) that just ask for any engineering degree.

That said however, once you actually graduate and start applying for jobs, you'll often find the degree title itself can be somewhat irrelevant and experience/what you can do much more important. I'm not necessarily talking about work experience here, but more about how many of the boxes in the job description can you tick?

For example, lets say you graduate with a degree in mechatronics and you see a job you like which asks for a mechatronic degree, you've got all the embedded systems knowledge, the programming and digital electronics on top of the mechanics for the types of projects you'd be working on. However the job description prefers (not required) some exposure to AI and experience with CAD, but you have neither. Chances are someone out there is able to demonstrate (not necessarily purely through the degree, eg work experience etc) they have bother, in which case are at more of an advantage.

That's a bit of a moot example really since I would expect most mechatronics degrees offer some training in design/CAD anyway, but just to demonstrate a point. On the other side of the coin, probably a more likely one, is you are the person with the 'box ticking' advantage (depending on the job you applied for) as you'll have demonstrated skills across two fields of engineering, I just wanted to demonstrate the degree title itself is fairly meaningless and usually only serves as a reference so you know what kind of skills they are after, the job description is where you'd truly know if you meet the requirements or not.

In which case I disagree that you should look at jobs asking for mechatronic degrees to get an idea of the employability options, as it is still somewhat of a niche at the moment and there won't be as many asking for mechatronics as there would be for electronics or mechanical, however that doesn't mean you cannot apply for the jobs asking for electronic and/or mechanical as it will largely depend on what skills you have and what they want you to have.
So do you think that mechatronic is a good option ?
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Et Tu, Brute?
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(Original post by NNB_Herath)
So do you think that mechatronic is a good option ?
yes. But it does depend on what you want to go into (any ideas?), in general though yes I think its a good degree to have, and if I was back at the UCAS application stage probably apply for mechatronics myself. That said I'm a little biased as i'm going down a robotics route.

Plus if you decided you wanted to specialise in a particular mechanical or electronic area, you could transfer to the BEng and so a specific MSc. Note though, it is best to apply to the MEng and change in year 2 at the latest to the BEng if that's what you wanted, it is harder (still common though) to go from BEng to MEng.
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NNB_Herath
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(Original post by Et Tu, Brute?)
yes. But it does depend on what you want to go into (any ideas?), in general though yes I think its a good degree to have, and if I was back at the UCAS application stage probably apply for mechatronics myself. That said I'm a little biased as i'm going down a robotics route.

Plus if you decided you wanted to specialise in a particular mechanical or electronic area, you could transfer to the BEng and so a specific MSc. Note though, it is best to apply to the MEng and change in year 2 at the latest to the BEng if that's what you wanted, it is harder (still common though) to go from BEng to MEng.
Mmmm I get it ..
I have decided to apply for MEng ...

Thanks for your helpful advice !!!!
Found them really useful
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