samantha551
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If the biomedical sciences degree isn't IBMS accredited, is it still possible to work in the NHS? As all the universities I'm looking aren't IMBS accredited.
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RegisteredBMS
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This subject is litered with misinformation. You can find my posts all around this forum trying to inform people but it does seem people don't seek it and instead op to ask without looking!

In order to act as a Biomedical Scientist you must have HCPC registration. This is obtained through completing your HCPC Portfolio. An aspect of this involves the requirement of having an IBMS-accredited degree. This can be obtained through doing an IBMS-accredited degree or doing a generic science degree and then completing top-up modules (expensive and long). You will then have to obtain a role in a laboratory. Trainee BMS roles are rare and extremely competitive. Most (maybe 95%) will work as a Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant and work on their portfolio doing that. This can take 12-24 months.

There is another, more efficient way that has come about over the past 5-7 years. The NHS Practitioner's Training Program. The NHS decided that like with nursing, midwifery and other NHS careers, there should be a degree with integrated placements that ticks all the boxes to walk straight into the career at graduate-level since, with a normal Biomedical Science degree you're still only qualified at a Band 2 level (which actually only requires GCSE's). As a degree, this program is called BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). It is a 3 year degree and it is IBMS accredited. What is special and an important factor about this is that you work through your portfolio throughout the 3 years of the degree. You have a 10-week rotation placement between Year 1 and 2 which allows you to have a brief overview of the pathology disciplines and decided what you like. You pick a specialism from Infection Science, Blood Science, Genetics and Cellular Science during your 2nd year and go on a discipline-related placement for 15-weeks between Year 2 and 3. During Year 3 you spend 4 days a week and 1 day in University. Your Year 3 placement is at the same place and discipline as your Year 2 placement. You are lectured by NHS Biomedical Scientists on the most part which means the content is far more applicable than the often research-geared content of the generic Biomedical Science course.

The career prospects of the PTP (BSc HCS) are brilliant. Many on my course finished their placement on the Friday and began work as a Biomedical Scientist on the Monday including myself. Those that didn't did so through choice as they went on to study a MSc or an alternate study program such as Physician's Associate or Graduate Entry Medicine.

It's important to note that you will need to get out of the Russell Group mentality. I know several who turned down the NHS PTP route because they wanted to go to a RG University. They now admit that I made the better choice. At the end of the day your degree is about getting a job and if you want to be a Biomedical Scientist then the PTP is the fastest, most efficient and also employable route. Assuming you pass everything, you will be HCPC registered at the end of the degree, any other route has many variables which could mean it takes ~5 years depending on the lab you end up in, rather than 3 years. Some labs are good training labs and are happy to train you up, some are stingy with it, and you won't find out until it's too late as it's not something you'll find out in the interview.
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Ibrahmistrar
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(Original post by TraineeBMS)
This subject is litered with misinformation. You can find my posts all around this forum trying to inform people but it does seem people don't seek it and instead op to ask without looking!

In order to act as a Biomedical Scientist you must have HCPC registration. This is obtained through completing your HCPC Portfolio. An aspect of this involves the requirement of having an IBMS-accredited degree. This can be obtained through doing an IBMS-accredited degree or doing a generic science degree and then completing top-up modules (expensive and long). You will then have to obtain a role in a laboratory. Trainee BMS roles are rare and extremely competitive. Most (maybe 95%) will work as a Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant and work on their portfolio doing that. This can take 12-24 months.

There is another, more efficient way that has come about over the past 5-7 years. The NHS Practitioner's Training Program. The NHS decided that like with nursing, midwifery and other NHS careers, there should be a degree with integrated placements that ticks all the boxes to walk straight into the career at graduate-level since, with a normal Biomedical Science degree you're still only qualified at a Band 2 level (which actually only requires GCSE's). As a degree, this program is called BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). It is a 3 year degree and it is IBMS accredited. What is special and an important factor about this is that you work through your portfolio throughout the 3 years of the degree. You have a 10-week rotation placement between Year 1 and 2 which allows you to have a brief overview of the pathology disciplines and decided what you like. You pick a specialism from Infection Science, Blood Science, Genetics and Cellular Science during your 2nd year and go on a discipline-related placement for 15-weeks between Year 2 and 3. During Year 3 you spend 4 days a week and 1 day in University. Your Year 3 placement is at the same place and discipline as your Year 2 placement. You are lectured by NHS Biomedical Scientists on the most part which means the content is far more applicable than the often research-geared content of the generic Biomedical Science course.

The career prospects of the PTP (BSc HCS) are brilliant. Many on my course finished their placement on the Friday and began work as a Biomedical Scientist on the Monday including myself. Those that didn't did so through choice as they went on to study a MSc or an alternate study program such as Physician's Associate or Graduate Entry Medicine.

It's important to note that you will need to get out of the Russell Group mentality. I know several who turned down the NHS PTP route because they wanted to go to a RG University. They now admit that I made the better choice. At the end of the day your degree is about getting a job and if you want to be a Biomedical Scientist then the PTP is the fastest, most efficient and also employable route. Assuming you pass everything, you will be HCPC registered at the end of the degree, any other route has many variables which could mean it takes ~5 years depending on the lab you end up in, rather than 3 years. Some labs are good training labs and are happy to train you up, some are stingy with it, and you won't find out until it's too late as it's not something you'll find out in the interview.
Yoooo dude, do the placements happen in your actual summer holidays or part of the year and in the 25 week placements and does your year finish 6 months later or it the 6 month placement part of the 12 months and are the placements like a test and if so how hard are they? Not in time consuming and boring but the difficulty of it? Thx appreciate a response asap. ill rep
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Ibrahmistrar)
Yoooo dude, do the placements happen in your actual summer holidays or part of the year and in the 25 week placements and does your year finish 6 months later or it the 6 month placement part of the 12 months and are the placements like a test and if so how hard are they? Not in time consuming and boring but the difficulty of it? Thx appreciate a response asap. ill rep
It's different at different universities but year 1 and 2 are during the summer and 3rd year placement during term. You aren't tested on placement bar your HCPC registration process which all have to do to be a BMS.
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dharma_redox
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(Original post by RegisteredBMS)
This subject is litered with misinformation. You can find my posts all around this forum trying to inform people but it does seem people don't seek it and instead op to ask without looking!

In order to act as a Biomedical Scientist you must have HCPC registration. This is obtained through completing your HCPC Portfolio. An aspect of this involves the requirement of having an IBMS-accredited degree. This can be obtained through doing an IBMS-accredited degree or doing a generic science degree and then completing top-up modules (expensive and long). You will then have to obtain a role in a laboratory. Trainee BMS roles are rare and extremely competitive. Most (maybe 95%) will work as a Band 2 Medical Laboratory Assistant and work on their portfolio doing that. This can take 12-24 months.

There is another, more efficient way that has come about over the past 5-7 years. The NHS Practitioner's Training Program. The NHS decided that like with nursing, midwifery and other NHS careers, there should be a degree with integrated placements that ticks all the boxes to walk straight into the career at graduate-level since, with a normal Biomedical Science degree you're still only qualified at a Band 2 level (which actually only requires GCSE's). As a degree, this program is called BSc Healthcare Science (Life Science). It is a 3 year degree and it is IBMS accredited. What is special and an important factor about this is that you work through your portfolio throughout the 3 years of the degree. You have a 10-week rotation placement between Year 1 and 2 which allows you to have a brief overview of the pathology disciplines and decided what you like. You pick a specialism from Infection Science, Blood Science, Genetics and Cellular Science during your 2nd year and go on a discipline-related placement for 15-weeks between Year 2 and 3. During Year 3 you spend 4 days a week and 1 day in University. Your Year 3 placement is at the same place and discipline as your Year 2 placement. You are lectured by NHS Biomedical Scientists on the most part which means the content is far more applicable than the often research-geared content of the generic Biomedical Science course.

The career prospects of the PTP (BSc HCS) are brilliant. Many on my course finished their placement on the Friday and began work as a Biomedical Scientist on the Monday including myself. Those that didn't did so through choice as they went on to study a MSc or an alternate study program such as Physician's Associate or Graduate Entry Medicine.

It's important to note that you will need to get out of the Russell Group mentality. I know several who turned down the NHS PTP route because they wanted to go to a RG University. They now admit that I made the better choice. At the end of the day your degree is about getting a job and if you want to be a Biomedical Scientist then the PTP is the fastest, most efficient and also employable route. Assuming you pass everything, you will be HCPC registered at the end of the degree, any other route has many variables which could mean it takes ~5 years depending on the lab you end up in, rather than 3 years. Some labs are good training labs and are happy to train you up, some are stingy with it, and you won't find out until it's too late as it's not something you'll find out in the interview.
Thank you for this comprehensive, informative answer
i see your answers a lot around here and really appreciate you getting people well informed about this
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Margarita Dhamaj
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I want to study biomedical sciences but I am not sure if i have to go at a non accredited uni like(King's,UCL,Imperial, Sheffiled)?
☛ if i go to this uni and i want to become a biomed scientist how much further years and what will i have to do to start work(can you explain this step by step please,as I'm international and i have not got used to the systems yet)
☛ if i finish a Bcs Hons degree from (kings,ucl,imperial) what van i study in Msci and will I have High chance of employment?
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Margarita Dhamaj)
I want to study biomedical sciences but I am not sure if i have to go at a non accredited uni like(King's,UCL,Imperial, Sheffiled)?
☛ if i go to this uni and i want to become a biomed scientist how much further years and what will i havIf e to do to start work(can you explain this step by step please,as I'm international and i have not got used to the systems yet)
☛ if i finish a Bcs Hons degree from (kings,ucl,imperial) what van i study in Msci and will I have High chance of employment?
If you decide you want to become a Biomedical Scientist with a non-accredited degree it'll depend how many top-up modules you need to do to reach the required standard. The main thing is you'll have to fund these top-up modules yourself, and that's not cheap.
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f.ga010301
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(Original post by samantha551)
If the biomedical sciences degree isn't IBMS accredited, is it still possible to work in the NHS? As all the universities I'm looking aren't IMBS accredited.
Hey, I am a student of biomedical science at London metropolitan university and the course is also accredited. if you do want to work in the NHS it's much less hassle if you enroll onto a course that is accredited with the IBMS. at London met you don't have to worry about that because the Biomed course is accredited. it has a 95% overall student satisfaction and personally, I think the course is of high quality. I did a foundation year and have just entered the first year of the Biomed course. I have to say that the level of support is great and the uni has a very friendly community. if you would like more info about the course I definitely suggest visiting the course webpage and if you have any more questions please do ask! I hope this helps.
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