Smack
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The aim of this thread is that eventually it should contain resources that are, hopefully, quite useful for potential and current engineering students, relating to matters from the purely academic to more general engineering interests.

All are welcome to contribute. If you come across something that you think is useful for engineering, please share it here.

This thread will also be a work in progress, and will be continually updated with new resources.

FAQ

Youtube Channels:
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There are a great many Youtube resources these days; here are some that I have came across. Some are strictly engineering related; others are more broader science related.

Learn Engineering - A good channel with good animations explaining how typical and common engineering components/systems work, such as gearboxes, helicopters and stepper motors.

Thomas Schwenke - Good animations and explanations, particularly for automotive related components.

The Engineering Mindset - HVAC/building services related content.

Structurefree - I've recommended this one previously, but it's a good one for much more academic related content regarding structures/structural engineering content, i.e. things that don't (or shouldn't!) move.

Real Engineering - This one is really good for engineering related explanations/discussions of engineering inventions.

Practical Engineering - Grady Hillhouse, the producer for this channel, is a practising civil engineer and hobbyist. This channel has a lot of awesome and accessible civil engineering related content, as well as some other cool stuff, like a robot that tracks the space station.

Engineering Explained - Really good for automotive related content. The producer of this channel is a mechanical engineering graduate and some of the videos provide somewhat more academic related explanations.

Curios Droid - This one isn't strictly engineering related, but it does have a lot of aerospace and outer space related content.

SciShow - Science related channel loaded with short, very educational videos that are definitely worth a watch.


Software Packages:
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Many engineering degrees these days will utilise various software packages, to help prepare you for industry. Whilst your university should provide you with all the software packages you require as part of the degree on their computer systems, some packages themselves are also available from the vendors to download as a student, either for free or at a reduced price, so that you can install and run them on your own systems.

Autodesk Inventor - This is essentially Autodesk's answer to SolidWorks, so it's a fully 3D CAD modelling package. Worth a look, I'd say.

Autodesk AutoCAD - Probably the most well known CAD software, due to its long history - I believe it was one of the first, if not the first, CAD software to be released commercially. Mainly used in civil and chemical engineering, as it is good for drafting and in 2D.

ANSYS - Commonly used finite element analysis (FEA) software package, and also provides CFD capabilities. The student FEA version is limited to 32,000 nodes, but this should be more than enough for your typical academic needs.

ABAQUS - An FEA package from the makers of SolidWorks (and CATIA), so I would imagine it would not be too difficult to take your SolidWorks models and import them. Never used it myself, so can't verify, but quite commonly used in oil & gas, and probably in other industries too.




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fab23
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How hard is it to get a job at Shell or ExxonMobil graduate job if you're studying chemical engineering at uni??
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Smack
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(Original post by fab23)
How hard is it to get a job at Shell or ExxonMobil graduate job if you're studying chemical engineering at uni??
Are you currently studying chemical engineering?
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fab23
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(Original post by Smack)
Are you currently studying chemical engineering?
Going to be this September.
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(Original post by fab23)
Going to be this September.
Okay, well, it's hard to say how the oil industry will be in 3-5 years when you graduate. But those companies, by virtue of being very well known, are probably going to be receiving a lot of applications.
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BTAnonymous
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what Engineering discipline did you study?
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Smack
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(Original post by BTAnonymous)
what Engineering discipline did you study?
Mechanical.
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(Original post by Smack)
Mechanical.
What did you want to do with your degree when you started and has that changed since?
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Smack
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(Original post by BTAnonymous)
What did you want to do with your degree when you started and has that changed since?
Good question. I'll answer this tomorrow when I have more time.
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Smack
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(Original post by BTAnonymous)
What did you want to do with your degree when you started and has that changed since?
I've had a think about this. The best answer I can give is that before I started my degree, I wanted a career in engineering, and this remains the same. I have felt for a while now that I wanted to do something more on the technical side of engineering, but at the same time I might have a case of the grass is greener syndrome. Sometimes you like seeing the bigger picture rather than focusing on something very specific.
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(Original post by Smack)
I've had a think about this. The best answer I can give is that before I started my degree, I wanted a career in engineering, and this remains the same. I have felt for a while now that I wanted to do something more on the technical side of engineering, but at the same time I might have a case of the grass is greener syndrome. Sometimes you like seeing the bigger picture rather than focusing on something very specific.
Thanks a lot for the insight
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Smack
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I've been neglecting this recently but I've added some Youtube channels that are worth checking out.

And a reminder: this thread is open for anyone to contribute to. All contributions welcome.
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rsto
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I think there are two aspects of engineering education. For one there is the technical side which is taught well in many schools and universities. On the other hand there are the non-technical aspects like motivation, learning techniques, work organization and planning, technical writing, presentation skills, and health aspects. These aspects are rarely taught at schools or universities, if at all. But these things are important contributors to excellence. I call these the
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