Lina Oaks
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I am new to this, but I have quite a few concerns that I would love a second opinion on.
I am a rising 10th grade student in the states. I would love to get at least a masters in aerospace engineering to later work for airforce aircraft design or work for a place like Boeing. The U.K. differs greatly from the system here and I would like some help to purse up until a masters in my chosen field. I am rather young because I have skipped the 8th and 10th grade. I will turn 16 and the August after I graduate high school which would my graduation the spring of 2019. I am focused on the money I can save by going to school in the U.K. since it is almost a third of some of the rates here and to what I assume is less time to get a degree. I have lived in the US since I was four years old and still line under a H-4 visa. I have no problem to switching to a Tier 4 student visa (F1). Since I could not work under the H-4 visa at all, the financial restrictions would actually be reduced drastically. My questions are numerous so bear with me:
1. Would I have any chance of getting into a good engineering college in UK as 15 year old girl with a high GPA and 8 AP classes by graduation?
2. While I understand the application process is similar to the one here, could anyone help me navigate through the applications website.
3. What is the difference between a Meng and a Beng?
4. Could I get a Meng without a Beng?
5. If my parents can get a US green are in 5 years, is it worth leaving?
6. Is it more likely that I could settle down in the U.K.than the US?
7. Would my job outlook differ?
8. Which places would be my best shot?
9. How long would it even take to get a masters/masters equivalent?
10. How would I work on the F1 visa to last that long? Extensions?
11. As I am going alone, would there be a problem?
12. If I go on the tier 4 at 16(~ish) could I stay at the university?
Any general guidance to help is greatly appreciated. I understand that I am rather unorthodox, but I would absolutely love more tips than why's and you probably should not's, etc. This is my first time using the U.K. Forum so thank you for you help!
0
reply
Helloworld_95
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
1) Yes, the quality of the top 10-20 engineering schools in the UK is roughly the same and the lowest entry requirements in these will be about 5,5,4 across 3 APs, at the highest you will likely be looking at 5,5,5,5. For the more internationally recognised universities you will be looking at 5,5,5 or 5,5,5,5. I would ask unis about the age thing though, it may be getting a bit too young, and I'll come back to the non-academic aspects of that after.

2) I would but I haven't done it in 5 years but from what I remember it's pretty much just input your details and write your personal statement (it's a bit different to the essays you would do for US colleges so look for guidance on TSR).

3&4) An MEng is an integrated Bachelor's+Master's degree although it's slightly different in practice, but isn't usually viewed that differently (it was seen as a lesser qualification than BEng+MSc internationally previously due to the 4th year in MEng being shorter than the MSc year combined with the MSc year already being very short but they're viewed the same in the large majority of places now, from what I've seen it's only China that will really treat them differently now and even then, not if you're a foreigner). BEng is just a bachelor's. They both share the first two years and then you can transfer between them before 3rd year starts. In general, the MEng is going to be the better option unless you just want to get out of uni as soon as possible, it will generally contain more advanced and interesting content even in 3rd year and while you would do one less thesis compared to someone who did a BEng+MSc, you have an additional chance to do a research placement.

5) Probably not, given your background you are likely to get some scholarships which would bring the cost of your education in the US down, depending on how much your parents earn you could even get a full ride at which point you wouldn't pay anything in the US compared to $160,000-$250,000 in the UK for an MEng including living and travel costs.

6) Also probably not, there are two types of people who get work visas for the UK: nurses and PhDs. If your parents are green card holders then you should be in too. You could get to PhD level in the UK but you would either need to pay your way through it yourself or apply for extremely competitive funding which is available to internationals. It would be recommended to go back to the US for your PhD even if you didn't have a green card as the funding for internationals is much easier to get there, then if you still can't settle in the US go back to the UK for your postdoc.

7) Yes, the top US engineering schools are a little bit more respected than the top UK ones because you kinda get what you pay for (although there's also TU Delft in the Netherlands which you should look into as this completely blows away this idea, it's a bit cheaper than the UK, and I think the program is in English too). There's also more space related opportunities in the US.

8) I'll come back to this later because the advantages and disadvantages of each are quite extensive.

9) 4 years

10) Isn't the F1 visa for the US?

11) You should be fine although the uni will need to act as your guarantor for housing and you will almost certainly have to stay in uni housing during second year as landlords don't really rent to under 18s. (Usually at a UK uni you would move out from uni owned halls to a house after 1st year.)

12) Yes, the minimum age for a Tier 4 is 16.

For general guidance I'm going to focus on your age. To be honest I think you'll be a bit too young for a UK university. There is a very present alcohol culture in the UK which will result in some limits on your socialising potential as the fake id culture doesn't really exist here. That's not to say you can't have a thriving social life without alcohol, just that you may miss out on social opportunities because of it e.g. a lot of flats will bond over nights out (although that won't be a problem if you're put in an under 18s flat, some unis also don't discriminate between 18+ and under 18 on their student card in which case you may be able to get into union nights anyway). At 17 it's a bit more doable as you've only got a year to wait.

Bear in mind travel costs, you're going to want to go home at Christmas so that's an extra significant expense, and a lot of internationals go travelling around Europe and the UK too so there will be stuff like visa costs involved in that too.
1
reply
Lina Oaks
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
Hey Helloworld_95, thank you so much for your feedback, but your answers only gave me more questions (sorry about that!), but here they are:
5. On my current visa status, I am considered an international student anyplace but my home country. To get a Masters in the US I'm looking at $65,000 for 7 yrs (455,000). My family can only afford around half of that or so (~200,000). We are a rather high-income family, we pay a lot of to extended family with not enough savings. That being said, this doesn't allow me to get need-based scholarships and as an international student, a merit-based scholarship is rare and not nearly enough. Not to mention, in the UK the student visa work limitations are looser. Even if I go overboard and spend beyond compare of amenities and such, what you quoted would be a true relief for my family and me. Would I still financially benefit from studying in the UK? All pros and cons and all, is it worth it.
6. With a MEng, could a get a better job in the US to settle down here?
10. Isn't the F1 the international student visa? Would it affect my chances at this visa if I applied when I was 15?
I don't celebrate Christmas, but I get your point. As much as I'd like to visit every summer, I know it isn't feasible. I plan on working anytime I'm not studying full time. Also, its also kind of cultural for me not to drink and such, so I'm not affected by this, the beside, the alcohol age here is 21. Thank you for your time and input!
0
reply
Helloworld_95
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by Lina Oaks)
Hey Helloworld_95, thank you so much for your feedback, but your answers only gave me more questions (sorry about that!), but here they are:
5. On my current visa status, I am considered an international student anyplace but my home country. To get a Masters in the US I'm looking at for 7 yrs (455,000). My family can only afford around half of that or so (~200,000). We are a rather high-income family, we pay a lot of to extended family with not enough savings. That being said, this doesn't allow me to get need-based scholarships and as an international student, a merit-based scholarship is rare and not nearly enough. Not to mention, in the UK the student visa work limitations are looser. Even if I go overboard and spend beyond compare of amenities and such, what you quoted would be a true relief for my family and me. Would I still financially benefit from studying in the UK? All pros and cons and all, is it worth it.
6. With a MEng, could a get a better job in the US to settle down here?
10. Isn't the F1 the international student visa? Would it affect my chances at this visa if I applied when I was 15?
I don't celebrate Christmas, but I get your point. As much as I'd like to visit every summer, I know it isn't feasible. I plan on working anytime I'm not studying full time. Also, its also kind of cultural for me not to drink and such, so I'm not affected by this, the beside, the alcohol age here is 21. Thank you for your time and input!
5) You can get need based as an international at a few places e.g. Harvard, MIT, Yale, in practice Stanford. Yes as long as you are an international student in the US you would probably have a financial benefit going to the UK but you should check out cheaper schools in the US and whether you would be eligible for a green card anytime soon.

6) Again you would really need a green card, whether you could get a better job is a complicated question to answer as each place has its ups and downs e.g. the US has higher starting pay but the UK and EU has a much better work-life balance.

10) Tier 4 is the student visa to come to the UK

Ah ok, if you don't drink and come from a culture where people don't drink then you'll be able to find similar people to spend time with (although a surprising number of people from countries where drinking is not as popular, or illegal, will also end up drinking and doing drugs so yeah...). The drinking age is 18 in the UK which is the more important part as it's a much bigger part of UK culture and so would being underage would have a pretty significant effect if you were someone who was ok with/wanted to drink.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (438)
56.3%
I don't have everything I need (340)
43.7%

Watched Threads

View All