Adult Nursing then onto physician associate?? Watch

Kitty1966
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
can anyone tell me if this would be possible? would i be able to do nursing for 3 years and then apply for pgdip physician associate as it sounds just what i would love to do but also have the experience to do what nurses do also
0
reply
Sheffield Hallam University
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by tonimaria)
can anyone tell me if this would be possible? would i be able to do nursing for 3 years and then apply for pgdip physician associate as it sounds just what i would love to do but also have the experience to do what nurses do also
Hi!

Yes you could straight onto doing Physician Associate but I would see how the nursing course holds because it opens lots of doors and you will gain a better insight at what you might what to do as you progress. The clinical practice that is involved whilst out on placement from the nursing course. It will be enough to progress you to the PgDip.

Let me know if you have anymore questions,
Reanne
1
reply
Kitty1966
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Sheffield Hallam University)
Hi!

Yes you could straight onto doing Physician Associate but I would see how the nursing course holds because it opens lots of doors and you will gain a better insight at what you might what to do as you progress. The clinical practice that is involved whilst out on placement from the nursing course. It will be enough to progress you to the PgDip.

Also, some nurses who are doing Physician Associate course they go on to do a Msc in Advanced Clinical Practice as this will allow them to prescribe.

Let me know if you have anymore questions,
Reanne
Hi!

Thankyou for the reply! I know, I think I'm jumping the gun as I'm excited to start my nursing course and was shown the physician Associate course which sounds great but people also say wait as you might find other routes through the nursing course to be even better suited to what you want to do in the future. The advanced clinical practice sounds great also, just need to see what's on offer before getting over my head
0
reply
TheEnchantress
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
Hiya, could you use your placement hours as experience when applying for a physician associate degree
I'm currently in year 12 and thinking of doing a undergraduate degree at UCLAN but because that's the only undergraduate degree I was personally thinking of doing a nursing degree and then a physician associate. One thing that worries me about a physician associate degree is whether or not i'll be able to find a job or get into the actual course, as there are so many people who are physician associates or are aspiring to be one (which isn't a bad thing because i'm one of them). Having a nursing degree would mean i have a backup just in case, as its only 1 year extra (Nursing+Pa=5 years, only: PA= 4 years) but i don't how things will plan out. I hope the government doesn't exploit the role of a PA and ruin it like they did with nursing .
0
reply
username3596896
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by tonimaria)
can anyone tell me if this would be possible? would i be able to do nursing for 3 years and then apply for pgdip physician associate as it sounds just what i would love to do but also have the experience to do what nurses do also
Hi there. When you said as a physician associate you will also be able to do what nurses do. What do you mean by that?

I'm asking because I've been getting the impression lately that a lot of people think PA involves nursing duties?

As a PA you wouldn't be doing the care work a nurse does. No washing, no turning, no mobilising assessments, no mobilising to the toilet, no drugs rounds. Thats a nurse's job role. As a PA you would be assisting doctors on diagnosing patients. You would be practicing medicine.

If this isn't what you meant great, but I thought I would chip in as this is a huge misunderstanding of the role that could lead people down the wrong career.
1
reply
Sheffield Hallam University
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by Magnolia0)
Hiya, could you use your placement hours as experience when applying for a physician associate degree
I'm currently in year 12 and thinking of doing a undergraduate degree at UCLAN but because that's the only undergraduate degree I was personally thinking of doing a nursing degree and then a physician associate. One thing that worries me about a physician associate degree is whether or not i'll be able to find a job or get into the actual course, as there are so many people who are physician associates or are aspiring to be one (which isn't a bad thing because i'm one of them). Having a nursing degree would mean i have a backup just in case, as its only 1 year extra (Nursing+Pa=5 years, only: PA= 4 years) but i don't how things will plan out. I hope the government doesn't exploit the role of a PA and ruin it like they did with nursing .
Hi Magnolia0


I spoke to the course leader of Physician Associate and this is her response to your question:

We don’t encourage nursing students to go onto a PA course for two reasons: Firstly, the PA role is to encourage people, not part of the NHS, to come into the clinical field so that the overall NHS workforce is increased. Secondly, being a nursing student does not give candidates adequate insight into working within the NHS (not simply doing a placement) to make an informed decision to move from one NHS speciality to another. It would be much better if candidates had actual work experience to show their insight into the clinical arena to be considered onto the course.

Let me know if you have any questions and I am happy to ask the course leader for you.

Reanne
3
reply
nusrat_r
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
Hi, I am currently in my second year of adult nursing but would hopefully like to go into doing the physician associates masters course. I was just wondering would it be a possiblity for me to do that, given that I have a degree in nursing? Many thanks
0
reply
tmayax
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Sheffield Hallam University)
Hi Magnolia0


I spoke to the course leader of Physician Associate and this is her response to your question:

We don’t encourage nursing students to go onto a PA course for two reasons: Firstly, the PA role is to encourage people, not part of the NHS, to come into the clinical field so that the overall NHS workforce is increased. Secondly, being a nursing student does not give candidates adequate insight into working within the NHS (not simply doing a placement) to make an informed decision to move from one NHS speciality to another. It would be much better if candidates had actual work experience to show their insight into the clinical arena to be considered onto the course.

Let me know if you have any questions and I am happy to ask the course leader for you.


Reanne
hi i am currently in year 11 and i want to become a physician associate but after doing my research i found out that you need a degree in life science/bioscience etc. so i thought i would do a nursing course now i can do a post graduate to become a physician associate. i have a few questions as soon as i graduate and get a degree from the nursing course can i automatically apply for the course (physician associate) and start the following september (or whenever) or would i have to actually work as a nurse?
I would like to be a physcian nurse as quickly as i can also do you recommend any other degrees to take.
0
reply
Sheffield Hallam University
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by tmayax)
hi i am currently in year 11 and i want to become a physician associate but after doing my research i found out that you need a degree in life science/bioscience etc. so i thought i would do a nursing course now i can do a post graduate to become a physician associate. i have a few questions as soon as i graduate and get a degree from the nursing course can i automatically apply for the course (physician associate) and start the following september (or whenever) or would i have to actually work as a nurse?
I would like to be a physcian nurse as quickly as i can also do you recommend any other degrees to take.
Hi tmayax

I got in touch with the one of the academics of Physician Associate and she responded:

I would recommend a bioscience degree if you are sure that you want to do the PA course. Make sure you also get some relevant work experience whilst doing this degree.

Let me know if you have any questions,

Reanne
0
reply
tmayax
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
Also do you know what alevels I need to do nursing in order to do the physician course
0
reply
Sheffield Hallam University
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by nusrat_r)
Hi, I am currently in my second year of adult nursing but would hopefully like to go into doing the physician associates masters course. I was just wondering would it be a possiblity for me to do that, given that I have a degree in nursing? Many thanks
Hi nusrat_r

I spoke to one of the academics and she said this:

Some universities will accept this as a suitable entry degree but I would advise you to work as a nurse for a little while before applying for the course so that you are sure that this is the right route for you.

Let me know if you have any more questions,

Reanne
0
reply
nusrat_r
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
Thank you for your reply! Yes, I think I will for a year as a nurse before applying for the PA course to get more clinical experience
0
reply
Sheffield Hallam University
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by tmayax)
Also do you know what alevels I need to do nursing in order to do the physician course
Hi @tmayax

To do a nursing degree, you will usually need to do at least two A levels with one in a science or health-related subject.

Reanne
0
reply
bm_sewell
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 year ago
#14
I qualified as a paediatric nurse in September 2017 and now have a place on a PA course starting this September! So it can definitely be done I had offers from several universities! Plus if you do it part time, you can keep your nursing registration up and go on to work in advance practice!
0
reply
nusrat_r
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 year ago
#15
Hi I was just wondering which university you're studying PA at? And also is it a PGCERT or a MSc?
0
reply
nusrat_r
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 year ago
#16
(Original post by bm_sewell)
I qualified as a paediatric nurse in September 2017 and now have a place on a PA course starting this September! So it can definitely be done I had offers from several universities! Plus if you do it part time, you can keep your nursing registration up and go on to work in advance practice!
Hi I was just wondering which university you are going to study PA at and also is a post graduate diploma or a masters that you are doing?
0
reply
username3596896
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 year ago
#17
Honestly, I don't understand the logic of some people on here. Why would you waste 3 years doing nursing when it's:

a) Completely irrelevant to Physician Associate studies. It does not prepare you in any way whatsoever.
b) You would clearly never go into nursing by the fact that you want to be a PA, so why waste your time doing it? PAs do not do ANY nursing duties.

Do they not have career advisers at universities anymore, to teach some common sense?
0
reply
username3596896
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 year ago
#18
(Original post by bm_sewell)
I qualified as a paediatric nurse in September 2017 and now have a place on a PA course starting this September! So it can definitely be done I had offers from several universities! Plus if you do it part time, you can keep your nursing registration up and go on to work in advance practice!
Sorry but, seriously? Advising someone to jump ship from nursing after graduating from it to another career path and then saying that she can do part time nursing whilst doing the PA course? So you think employers will accept someone with ZERO experience doing a part time job when they know its temporary, in an environment where there is a shortage of a committed workforce?

Jesus Christ. University education is for WORK. WORK requires a period of SACRIFICE and COMMITMENT in order to let the employer know that you are serious! It isn't some make money quick scheme where you can do multiple things at once like the world is your oyster, when you've barely wiped your own arse. Honestly, please try to give our generation some advice that's actually grounded in reality.
0
reply
bm_sewell
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 year ago
#19
(Original post by BChutney)
Sorry but, seriously? Advising someone to jump ship from nursing after graduating from it to another career path and then saying that she can do part time nursing whilst doing the PA course? So you think employers will accept someone with ZERO experience doing a part time job when they know its temporary, in an environment where there is a shortage of a committed workforce?

Jesus Christ. University education is for WORK. WORK requires a period of SACRIFICE and COMMITMENT in order to let the employer know that you are serious! It isn't some make money quick scheme where you can do multiple things at once like the world is your oyster, when you've barely wiped your own arse. Honestly, please try to give our generation some advice that's actually grounded in reality.
Quite simply, youre wrong. I'm working as a nurse at the moment, and will continue to keep my job as I train as a PA. So it can be done! And the course I will be commencing has had many successful healthcare practitioners move from their profession to the PA profession, including those that have done the course part time alongside work. So you're outdated views have no foundation; what you're saying isn't possible actually has plenty of precedent.

It's a shame you're so pessimistic. The world is your oyster and you should grasp any opportunity you can and want to!
2
reply
username3596896
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 year ago
#20
(Original post by bm_sewell)
Quite simply, youre wrong. I'm working as a nurse at the moment, and will continue to keep my job as I train as a PA. So it can be done! And the course I will be commencing has had many successful healthcare practitioners move from their profession to the PA profession, including those that have done the course part time alongside work. So you're outdated views have no foundation; what you're saying isn't possible actually has plenty of precedent.

It's a shame you're so pessimistic. The world is your oyster and you should grasp any opportunity you can and want to!
So you're saying I, a person who is doing the course at the moment, am wrong with no foundation to what I say. But you haven't even started the course yet. Nice. The average PA course is 30-40 hours of timetabled study. You are expected to double that with self directed study if you want any hope of not only passing the exam, but actually being a competent practitioner. That is circa 50-60 hours of the week devoted to the course alone.

I don't know how you can responsibly tell anyone that they should consider that as a possibility. CAN it be done? Yes I guess it can. Is it worth the sacrifice? I don't think so and neither do the courses, all of which specifically advise against being in employment during the course. The FPA advises this also (I assume you know who they are). So I don't think it is responsible to be so flippant about it like it can be done at the flip of a switch. If anyone is willing to do it, it will be HARD and people should be made aware of this.

Call it pessimism if you will, but I don't think your pie in the sky YOLO attitude is helpful to anyone who actually wants to make an informed decision.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Nov '19
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Course Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 2 Feb '20
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20

Are you registered to vote?

18-20 years old (yes) (150)
53.76%
18-20 years old (no) (34)
12.19%
20-25 years old (yes) (43)
15.41%
20-25 years old (no) (4)
1.43%
25-30 years old (yes) (19)
6.81%
25-30 years old (no) (0)
0%
30-40 years old (yes) (15)
5.38%
30-40 years old (no) (2)
0.72%
40+ years old (yes) (6)
2.15%
40+ years old (no) (6)
2.15%

Watched Threads

View All