do you need to take a level maths alongside a level physics?

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Bertybassett
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I understand that its not a 'rule', but just how hard is the maths in a level physics and could I still do the maths in a level physics without doing a level maths at the same time, because I don't really want to do maths a level.
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HHJ11
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(Original post by Bertybassett)
I understand that its not a 'rule', but just how hard is the maths in a level physics and could I still do the maths in a level physics without doing a level maths at the same time, because I don't really want to do maths a level.
This is exactly my issue xD... I'll just follow this thread
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Bertybassett
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(Original post by Haider_A)
This is exactly my issue xD... I'll just follow this thread
Just found this thread. might be useful.

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=4651494
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rosie.mn
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Not many people take physics without maths so it would be wise to if you can.
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Bertybassett
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(Original post by rosie.mn)
Not many people take physics without maths so it would be wise to if you can.
thanks for the reply. but if you could get an A or A* at gcse maths how hard would it be to take a level physics without taking maths at the same time?
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rosie.mn
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(Original post by Bertybassett)
thanks for the reply. but if you could get an A or A* at gcse maths how hard would it be to take a level physics without taking maths at the same time?
I don't do physics so I couldn't say but those that I know who do it say they would struggle without the maths knowledge from a level. They are just complimentary it's foolish to take one without the other, but if you felt it would be too hard for you im sure you could cope, you may just find some of the maths harder to grasp as you'll only have GCSE knowledge.
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artful_lounger
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A-level Physics has been algebra based, not calculus based, from ~2010 I believe. Unless they've substantially changed the syllabus for the "new" version, you shouldn't NEED anything beyond GCSE Maths (this is in fact the great weakness of A-level Physics imo but, I digress).

However, any degree course that requires A-level Physics also necessarily requires A-level Maths, so there is no point in taking one without the other. Any Engineering course that requires Physics will also require Maths, any Physics course will require both, Chemistry courses will accept chem/phys as two science A-levels sometimes but most strongly prefer or require Maths (Southampton for example has lower offer boundaries for students with Chem/Maths, or Chem/Maths/second science or FM), etc, etc.

Unless you're a prospective medic/natural sciences (at Cambridge and/or elsewhere) applicant who wants to take 4 science A-levels, but doesn't want to take Further Maths it's pointless (I'd argue it's also pointless in that circumstance but to each their own).

So it's not really a question of can you but more a question of why would you take it without Maths. A random science subject doesn't really add anything to your A-level profile unless it's Maths or possibly Chemistry; otherwise they are best taken in combination, of at least 2 or ideally 3. You don't add any options taking one, and may limit yourself in other ways if you do just take a random science subject among other "arts" subjects (excepting again, Maths, which is always useful in general for demonstrating quantitative skills, and extremely useful to essential for some things like economics and similar. Chemistry opens options in chemistry and biosciences, some degrees of which may accept you with just the one science, and a handful of medicine courses who only ostensibly require chemistry and may accept other academically rigorous arts subjects such as History - this may not even be the case any more either.).
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k92e67
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you'll regret it.
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Bertybassett
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regret what and why? do you have personal experience yourself?
(Original post by k92e67)
you'll regret it.
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Bertybassett
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
A-level Physics has been algebra based, not calculus based, from ~2010 I believe. Unless they've substantially changed the syllabus for the "new" version, you shouldn't NEED anything beyond GCSE Maths (this is in fact the great weakness of A-level Physics imo but, I digress).

However, any degree course that requires A-level Physics also necessarily requires A-level Maths, so there is no point in taking one without the other. Any Engineering course that requires Physics will also require Maths, any Physics course will require both, Chemistry courses will accept chem/phys as two science A-levels sometimes but most strongly prefer or require Maths (Southampton for example has lower offer boundaries for students with Chem/Maths, or Chem/Maths/second science or FM), etc, etc.

Unless you're a prospective medic/natural sciences (at Cambridge and/or elsewhere) applicant who wants to take 4 science A-levels, but doesn't want to take Further Maths it's pointless (I'd argue it's also pointless in that circumstance but to each their own).

So it's not really a question of can you but more a question of why would you take it without Maths. A random science subject doesn't really add anything to your A-level profile unless it's Maths or possibly Chemistry; otherwise they are best taken in combination, of at least 2 or ideally 3. You don't add any options taking one, and may limit yourself in other ways if you do just take a random science subject among other "arts" subjects (excepting again, Maths, which is always useful in general for demonstrating quantitative skills, and extremely useful to essential for some things like economics and similar. Chemistry opens options in chemistry and biosciences, some degrees of which may accept you with just the one science, and a handful of medicine courses who only ostensibly require chemistry and may accept other academically rigorous arts subjects such as History - this may not even be the case any more either.).
the point in doing it would be because physics is the only other science from biology (which i am taking as an a level) that i enjoy, and also the only other facilitating subject that i like. furthermore, many uni courses require 2 sciences.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Bertybassett)
the point in doing it would be because physics is the only other science from biology (which i am taking as an a level) that i enjoy, and also the only other facilitating subject that i like. furthermore, many uni courses require 2 sciences.
If you intend to continue in the biosciences, chemistry is virtually a required prerequisite. Even if you don't do chemistry at A-level and continue to a bioscience course, you'll almost certainly do the exact same content, but in about a quarter of the time, within that course.

Chemistry underpins all of modern molecular and cell biology, and even areas like ecology, conservation and evolutionary science are rapidly beginning to use these advances in their fields, and as such it's becoming much more widespread at the undergraduate level.

Biology and Physics together doesn't really prepare you for anything, and even the pair with Maths isn't ideal unless you're specifically aiming at some Biomedical/Biological Engineering type courses which prefer biology to chemistry (there are a few).

It's also worth noting just because you didn't enjoy a subject at GCSE doesn't mean you won't enjoy it at A-level; the difference in style and content often changes significantly in this jump, notably for Maths. This is also true to an extent of Chemistry. GCSE Science in general is very "ho-hum" and unless you have really excellent teachers can be quite uninspiring. Equally even if you have a good teacher GCSE Maths has a tendency to be rather dull and pedantic compared to the more interesting problem solving elements of A-level Maths.
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S2M
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(Original post by Bertybassett)
I understand that its not a 'rule', but just how hard is the maths in a level physics and could I still do the maths in a level physics without doing a level maths at the same time, because I don't really want to do maths a level.
If you don't want to do Physics later on like in university or something that doesn't require maths at A-Level then don't do it. There are a few school/colleges that might have a strict requirement of taking both maths and physics if you wish to take one of them. It's possible to do A-Level Physics without maths because the maths won't be too rigorous or too hard to understand without A-Level Maths. I also know quite a few people who done physics without maths and they done fine.
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WhiteScythe
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Would be a terrible decision
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Bertybassett
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(Original post by WhiteScythe)
Would be a terrible decision
why though
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kimberly.
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I'm taking A level physics without maths. It shouldn't really be a problem because maths basics, we've learnt already.
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NNB_Herath
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(Original post by kimberly.)
I'm taking A level physics without maths. It shouldn't really be a problem because maths basics, we've learnt already.
You will be screwed up eventually at A2 !!
You need maths !!

NO PHYSICS WITHOUT MATHS !!
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BTAnonymous
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No but you should do it. You're kind of shooting yourself in the foot if you don't.

And if you do take Maths, do mechanics, f*ck stats. It'll give you a nice start in projectiles, SUVAT equations and momentum.
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kimberly.
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(Original post by NNB_Herath)
You will be screwed up eventually at A2 !!
You need maths !!

NO PHYSICS WITHOUT MATHS !!
I mean, I didn't really get the best maths marks and I'm not pursuing physics for mechanical jobs or anything, it's mainly just about the fact that i like physics more than chem and I need a science other than bio (which I'm already taking) . I also did 4 months of AS chemistry before I came back to England and I hated (and failed) it.
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