How long do you think it is until the EU breaks apart? Watch

Alowa1
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#1
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The refugee & economic migrant crisis is putting an unprecedented amount of strain on Europe. And it is all being fueled by the EU's leaders who want open borders not only within Europe, but to the rest of the world too.

This is the reason why the UK left the EU, and it will be the cause of the EU breaking apart - There is no doubt that the EU will break apart because of this, how long do you think it will take for this to happen?
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Meany Pie
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I think we will see the collapse of the EU within a decade.

However I wouldn't be surprised if we see a new EU come out of but made up of nations with compatible economies.

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Dodgypirate
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(Original post by Meany Pie)
I think we will see the collapse of the EU within a decade.

However I wouldn't be surprised if we see a new EU come out of but made up of nations with compatible economies.

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A federal state. The United States of Europe.
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Meany Pie
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(Original post by Dodgypirate)
A federal state. The United States of Europe.
Where speaking English will be punishable by death.
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username3196026
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Certainly within the next 10 years, but more likely it will fracture and some countries will leave sooner than that. The EU as a project is dead and Brexit was just the first step in this - it's been built on a house of cards. A number of countries will be ejected from the Eurozone, Greece being the first when it eventually defaults on the massive bail-out loans. It's been a total disaster of a project - the concept of a united Europe is admirable, and under a different guise it could have worked, but in its current state the EU is untenable as a long-term institution as it's neither inherently stable nor robust. Trying to merge all those different economies into one unified system was never going to work, there is just too much difference, and they have tried to centralize and unify countries together far too quickly... The growth of the EU has been far too quick and I think they've tried to do too much, too soon. And the open-door policy is alienating more and more people and driving living standards down across the member states. I am beginning to suspect that the EU is being destroyed by design from within - how else can you explain some of the crazy policy decisions and the incessant desire for centralization of power which is only alienating the average citizen...
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uberteknik
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(Original post by PepticSalve)
Certainly within the next 10 years, but more likely it will fracture and some countries will leave sooner than that. The EU as a project is dead and Brexit was just the first step in this - it's been built on a house of cards. A number of countries will be ejected from the Eurozone, Greece being the first when it eventually defaults on the massive bail-out loans. It's been a total disaster of a project - the concept of a united Europe is admirable, and under a different guise it could have worked, but in its current state the EU is untenable as a long-term institution as it's neither inherently stable nor robust. Trying to merge all those different economies into one unified system was never going to work, there is just too much difference, and they have tried to centralize and unify countries together far too quickly... The growth of the EU has been far too quick and I think they've tried to do too much, too soon. And the open-door policy is alienating more and more people and driving living standards down across the member states. I am beginning to suspect that the EU is being destroyed by design from within - how else can you explain some of the crazy policy decisions and the incessant desire for centralization of power which is only alienating the average citizen...
I think it was more to do with the collapse of the Soviet Union at the very end of the 1980's. From that moment, the old annexed states which were independent Sovereignties prior to WWII, had the opportunity of joining the NATO alliance to protect against a re-emergent expansionist Russia.

That morphed into economic union because those states wanted to be recognised as independent once again and throw away the Soviet shackles.

The EU was keen to embrace them because if left too long, Russia would flex muscle again and that was a risk greater than the economic challenges and resulting diaspora.

Of course, political activists and conspiracy theorists love to spin the reality to suit their own agenda.
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SyriaNews
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I don't understand why they can't just patrol the shores of the countries these people come form. That way they can stop boats from leaving, which itself is a dangerous journey that has killed thousands.

If you think of it like that they will save lives. Of course we can still help them by providing some aid.

Apparently that is breaking international law wtf?


I just don't get it.. who came up with these laws anyway? I'm pretty sure many countries break these laws, and nothing is done about it anyway.


Is it any surprise given what is happening that there are Europeans turning to nationalism and even neo-Nazism.



Refugees welcome is extremism. By promoting more people to come, you are encouraging this problem. Why can't they understand this? you may not think its a problem, because you have not thought of the implications and no I'm not even talking about financially.


When discussing immigration, there is never any consideration of Europe's native population and the effect it will have on it. Isn't that racist?
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shawn_o1
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Greece wished they were out. Sure, their debt problems are their fault but they can't decide to sort out the mess by themselves because the EU wants to keep them in for their political pet project. Plus they've now been forced to act like an entrance for migrants to move further up Europe.
If Hungary keep their far right leader in power they might want out too. They're also tired of being told that migrants must trample over their land on the way to "a better life".
Then you got Italy who are also getting tired of the migrant crisis. If Austria, who are planning to secure their borders, are told off by the EU for doing so then they'll think about leaving too. Domino effect, all thanks to Merkel's open arms policy.
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uberteknik
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(Original post by SyriaNews)
Apparently that is breaking international law wtf?

I just don't get it.. who came up with these laws anyway? I'm pretty sure many countries break these laws, and nothing is done about it anyway.
The laws are maritime and were there to save lives on the high seas at a time long before GPS, mobile phones, internet or even radio communications no more advanced than morse code. dot dot dot. dash dash dash. dot dot dot. (international S.O.S.)

The problem is that international law is hard to change because countries need to ratify it. UN countries that have an interest in people migrating into Europe and countries that just want to use it as a political tool will all veto law change. Think Russia, China, Libya, Turkey, Iran, Somalia et al.
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SCIENCE :D
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#10
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Not long now.
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MagicNMedicine
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#11
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I wonder if the UK will break apart before the EU.
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asim1999
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(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
I wonder if the UK will break apart before the EU.
It all depends if Jimmy Krankie has a second independence referendum and wins
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ed98
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#13
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I think it will cling together for about 15 years.

Give it a few more terrorist attacks, and the French will elect Le Pen as their next president. She will give them a referendum and the French will definitely vote to leave, then that it pretty much it for the EU, although they will try to cling together for as long as possible.
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ed98
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(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
I wonder if the UK will break apart before the EU.
I think the UK is currently more united than it has been for a very long time.
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Tootles
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#15
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(Original post by Meany Pie)
I think we will see the collapse of the EU within a decade.

However I wouldn't be surprised if we see a new EU come out of but made up of nations with compatible economies.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Pretty much what I was thinking, though I'd maybe stretch to fifteen years. No more than that though.

(Original post by Dodgypirate)
A federal state. The United States of Europe.
IIRC this was the original plan when Europe began teaming up together in the aftermath of WW2.
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