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Law.... is it hard to get a job after?

Hi all, I am currently on a gap year and will be going uni this year. I have applied for Human Biology but I am still thinking of other courses.
I was thinking of law for quite a while , I didn't study law as one of my A-levels(I did Maths, Biology and Psychology). I want to know from students who have attended uni like warwick , Birmingham how they found the course but also is it hard to get a job after? I have heard so many people say it is saturated competitive but what would I need to do in order to stand out?
Thanks in advance
Yes, legal employment after graduating is difficult and competitive. But there are thousands of opportunities out there across the country. It really depends on what might interest you in law and also where you want to work geographically though.

Generally to stand out from the crowd you need:

- good academics
- clear motivation for the career
- work experience
- a sense that you have kept yourself busy whilst studying
- evidence of liking responsibility and going outside of your comfort zone
- an understanding of the pressures of the career and strong self awareness to show you know what your letting yourself in for, and that you will be able to cope with it.

Posted from TSR Mobile


Hi many thanks for your reply,
Have you studied law? If you have which university and did you enjoy it?
Also would you be able to recommend any law firms or companies where I an get a better insight to law?
Thanks
Reply 2
You have to do, in my assessment, the little things to make yourself stand out.
When I was in law school, I was on the Law Review and eventually became
part of the Executive Board. I did Mock Trial competitions and placed well.
I made myself active in the legal community of the law school, I did an Honor's
Law Internship at the Department of Justice. So, when I graduated, there
were people with better grades than me, for sure (LOL!)-but almost all of
them just went to law school, made the grades, but did absolutely nothing.
NOT that I am saying you should not make good grades or that you can
be super-active with horrible grades and come out like roses. You need
to try to have a healthy balance between doing well or very well in
your school work, while remaining a person who has job skills that you
have nurtured and worked on, that an employer can see.

Try to become a great researcher, try to excel at mock trials or moot
court competitions, become part of the law review or law journal, show
you can take what you are taking from the classroom and translate it
into practical experience-see, when you do these things as a law
student, potential employers already see that potential in you, you are
multi-dimensional. If you can learn a second language, or a third, more
the better. If you can show special knowledge (this is why researching
some topic of interest in law school, which is normally a part of law review,
is important-you can bring, even the beginning levels of expertise in that
topic unlike most new graduates.) Also, and this is very important...if
you can be willing to look for worldwide opportunities-then you greatly
expand your playing field. And should you, while in law school,
specialize in China, or Japan, or the EU Law, if you should lean heavily
in those areas, then that is also important-because you compared to
the person who did not have those skills, you can surpass them on
the hiring board.

Finally one thing I will say, perhaps a bit controversial. When I was
wanting, through the program they offer American lawyers, to come to
The UK and become Solicitors or Barristers-I was worried because I
am an American and do not have a UK accent,that I would not be
accepted.(ultimately I did not pursue this option, but it does interest me)
I was told, that a big deal in the UK, if you are a member of one of
the Masonic orders, or something along those lines (Knights of
Columbus, etc.) it instantly, in the UK (and I would, from what my Dad,
who is a Mason has told me, say in many places around the world)
open up some additional doors, through networking for you, big time.
(and the same, to some extent is true of fraternities and sororities, too)

Hope this is helpful.


Original post by Bluebell1234
Hi all, I am currently on a gap year and will be going uni this year. I have applied for Human Biology but I am still thinking of other courses.
I was thinking of law for quite a while , I didn't study law as one of my A-levels(I did Maths, Biology and Psychology). I want to know from students who have attended uni like warwick , Birmingham how they found the course but also is it hard to get a job after? I have heard so many people say it is saturated competitive but what would I need to do in order to stand out?
Thanks in advance
This is not controversial. It is a load of rubbish.

Plenty of non-British people with accents enter the profession. Although both solicitors and barristers will stress you need exceptional written and verbal language skills.

And the second point is even more hilarious where it is not true.




Posted from TSR Mobile


What about getting any graduate job, not specifically in the legal sector? Is that equally as competitive, with a law degree? I ask because I'm not 100% sure what I would want to do with my degree.

Also, when you talked about entering the legal profession, were you mainly referring to large commercial firms, or in general? Would smaller or medium sized firms be less competitive?
Original post by luq_ali
You have to do, in my assessment, the little things to make yourself stand out.
When I was in law school, I was on the Law Review and eventually became
part of the Executive Board. I did Mock Trial competitions and placed well.
I made myself active in the legal community of the law school, I did an Honor's
Law Internship at the Department of Justice. So, when I graduated, there
were people with better grades than me, for sure (LOL!)-but almost all of
them just went to law school, made the grades, but did absolutely nothing.
NOT that I am saying you should not make good grades or that you can
be super-active with horrible grades and come out like roses. You need
to try to have a healthy balance between doing well or very well in
your school work, while remaining a person who has job skills that you
have nurtured and worked on, that an employer can see.

Try to become a great researcher, try to excel at mock trials or moot
court competitions, become part of the law review or law journal, show
you can take what you are taking from the classroom and translate it
into practical experience-see, when you do these things as a law
student, potential employers already see that potential in you, you are
multi-dimensional. If you can learn a second language, or a third, more
the better. If you can show special knowledge (this is why researching
some topic of interest in law school, which is normally a part of law review,
is important-you can bring, even the beginning levels of expertise in that
topic unlike most new graduates.) Also, and this is very important...if
you can be willing to look for worldwide opportunities-then you greatly
expand your playing field. And should you, while in law school,
specialize in China, or Japan, or the EU Law, if you should lean heavily
in those areas, then that is also important-because you compared to
the person who did not have those skills, you can surpass them on
the hiring board.

Finally one thing I will say, perhaps a bit controversial. When I was
wanting, through the program they offer American lawyers, to come to
The UK and become Solicitors or Barristers-I was worried because I
am an American and do not have a UK accent,that I would not be
accepted.(ultimately I did not pursue this option, but it does interest me)
I was told, that a big deal in the UK, if you are a member of one of
the Masonic orders, or something along those lines (Knights of
Columbus, etc.) it instantly, in the UK (and I would, from what my Dad,
who is a Mason has told me, say in many places around the world)
open up some additional doors, through networking for you, big time.
(and the same, to some extent is true of fraternities and sororities, too)

Hope this is helpful.


Hi thank you for replying,
I guess all these opportunities are available but only when you enter university- like law firms would less likely to offer work experience to people before uni or am I wrong?
Reply 5
I will not personally insult you, you are entitled to your opinion. However, I have
never been one to just want to make it by, my question was on being the best.
For that matter, we have MANY lawyers in the U.S. who have foreign accents,
who speak in broken English, etc. However, I will say, in my experience,
in the U.S., in jury trial work and appellate arguments at all levels, they do face
discrimination. We have lawyers for the UK who practice in the U.S., they learn
to tone down and alter, slightly their words to the audience, so that the audience
is more receptive to hearing and comprehending what they are saying.

Moreover, as a secondary note, and will I respect your opinion, it is not
clothing me or feeding me or offering me shelter, so it is not really relevant
to me, but let me point out something. You do not know me, who I am, who
it was I was speaking with or the level of cases I was looking to get
involved with. Your argument is as fallacious as saying that remedies
to relieve racism must all be racially neutral, when in fact, is having white
skin that is the privilege, upon first seeing the person-in the mind of those
who harbor such venom, that they base the preferential treatment on. You
can argue that people do NOT discriminate against people with different
accents or methods of speaking than their own, you are free to do that,
but I fear reality is much different.You can argue people are NOT treated
differently based upon their gender, religion, ethnicity, racial or national
origin and that all are free to come, NOT as the exception, but the rule
and be the best they can be because everything is color blind. You can
argue that, but its not reality here, or in the UK, but accept as reality
what you will. Finally, the persons I spoke with, unknown to you, were
NOT saying a person should become or be active in such a fraternal,
Masonic order as a condition to entry into the profession or to have success,
they were making a suggestion, from their own experiences and what
they intended to do for me in that network, as a aid to me making, more
easily, that transition, because it is NOT just what you know, it is who
you know. I had the best projects of any of the law students in my
group at The Department of Justice, why? Because vouching for me
was a professor who had worked with the man in civil rights cases
who later on became the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights,
which gave me that inside connection. I still had to do the work and
earn the praise. My response was to the original poster of this thread,
who I hope reads, objectively, and calmly, what I wrote. You, my dear
friend, are free to take it or let it alone, either way, the Earth will
keep circumnavigating the Sun, at the rate of 1037 1/3 mph, regardless.:smile:


This is not controversial. It is a load of rubbish.

Plenty of non-British people with accents enter the profession. Although both solicitors and barristers will stress you need exceptional written and verbal language skills.

And the second point is even more hilarious where it is not true.




Posted from TSR Mobile
Reply 6
Well law firms and other legal employers do offer internships and
experience to those who are not yet in law school. I know we had,
in the public sector, for example, undergraduate students who worked
for lawyers. When I was an Assistant City Solicitor, I had a law intern,
who was a 2nd year law student, but I also had a student who had
finished undergraduate school at the university, who was potentially
interested in going to law school, and so she was able to get some
experience and insights into the legal world, eventually got a paid
position and was trained as a paralegal, and then later went on to
law school. A smaller firm would be more likely to extend that type of
path, but that is more of a general statement because it varies by
the type of law, what type of firm we are talking about (because
for example, The Crown Prosecutor employees investigators,
paralegals and clerks who may later go on to law school, its not
at all uncommon, and the same is true of small, medium and big
firms. When I was in the university, I had a 20 year old girlfriend
who, though her major was Economics, she worked at a small law
firm, answered phones, did some clerical work initially, then was
trained to do more and more, and by the time she left, she could
have, if she had wanted to, gone further(she went to work for
Apple instead).



Original post by Bluebell1234
Hi thank you for replying,
I guess all these opportunities are available but only when you enter university- like law firms would less likely to offer work experience to people before uni or am I wrong?
Original post by luq_ali
You have to do, in my assessment, the little things to make yourself stand out.
When I was in law school, I was on the Law Review and eventually became
part of the Executive Board. I did Mock Trial competitions and placed well.
I made myself active in the legal community of the law school, I did an Honor's
Law Internship at the Department of Justice. So, when I graduated, there
were people with better grades than me, for sure (LOL!)-but almost all of
them just went to law school, made the grades, but did absolutely nothing.
NOT that I am saying you should not make good grades or that you can
be super-active with horrible grades and come out like roses. You need
to try to have a healthy balance between doing well or very well in
your school work, while remaining a person who has job skills that you
have nurtured and worked on, that an employer can see.

Try to become a great researcher, try to excel at mock trials or moot
court competitions, become part of the law review or law journal, show
you can take what you are taking from the classroom and translate it
into practical experience-see, when you do these things as a law
student, potential employers already see that potential in you, you are
multi-dimensional. If you can learn a second language, or a third, more
the better. If you can show special knowledge (this is why researching
some topic of interest in law school, which is normally a part of law review,
is important-you can bring, even the beginning levels of expertise in that
topic unlike most new graduates.) Also, and this is very important...if
you can be willing to look for worldwide opportunities-then you greatly
expand your playing field. And should you, while in law school,
specialize in China, or Japan, or the EU Law, if you should lean heavily
in those areas, then that is also important-because you compared to
the person who did not have those skills, you can surpass them on
the hiring board.

Finally one thing I will say, perhaps a bit controversial. When I was
wanting, through the program they offer American lawyers, to come to
The UK and become Solicitors or Barristers-I was worried because I
am an American and do not have a UK accent,that I would not be
accepted.(ultimately I did not pursue this option, but it does interest me)
I was told, that a big deal in the UK, if you are a member of one of
the Masonic orders, or something along those lines (Knights of
Columbus, etc.) it instantly, in the UK (and I would, from what my Dad,
who is a Mason has told me, say in many places around the world)
open up some additional doors, through networking for you, big time.
(and the same, to some extent is true of fraternities and sororities, too)

Hope this is helpful.

i know its been six years since ur message but i have a question about things that i can do to increase my chances of landing a high end job as my a level grades were not good but i am currently studying law annd hopefully want to become a successful lawyer. My question is basically what can i do to increase my chances of that happening. Any help will be much appreciated.
Original post by Bluebell1234
Hi all, I am currently on a gap year and will be going uni this year. I have applied for Human Biology but I am still thinking of other courses.
I was thinking of law for quite a while , I didn't study law as one of my A-levels(I did Maths, Biology and Psychology). I want to know from students who have attended uni like warwick , Birmingham how they found the course but also is it hard to get a job after? I have heard so many people say it is saturated competitive but what would I need to do in order to stand out?
Thanks in advance

Hi there,

It's great to hear that you are exploring your options and keeping them open! I did not study Law but my partner did (not at any of the uni's listed I'm afraid) and he got a job after graduating working for the CPS so I have brief insights!

Like others have said, there are little things that you can do whilst studying Law at university that can enhance your job applications. For example, you can do Legal Aid as an undergraduate student at law firms and do so many hours that meet your lecturer's expectations. You may find that these lecturer's have came out of the law sector and into higher education, but still have connections for their student's to take advantage of!

If the university you go to has a career's service, I would definitely speak to them about a placement year whilst you are studying. Vocational subjects, such as Law, can be based around experience and if you are able to, get all the experience you can get and be prepared for setbacks as it is a competitive field!

Towards the end of your time at university, you can be looking into jobs and researching different firms, depending on what type of Law you wish to go into, just so you can get some options under your belt for when you are a graduate!

Best of luck for the future :smile:

Estelle
Graduate Advocate
(edited 5 months ago)

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