Bluebell1234
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hi, I want to know what economics at Lougborough is like.
I am currently on a gap year and achieved AAB in Maths, Biology and Psychology last year. I have applied for Human Biology at Bimringham but I am still thinking of other courses.
Due to personal circumstances I was unable to attend the open day that was held quite recently and I really wanted to go to get a better insight into the department. I tried contacting Loughborough university but no one seemed to answer?
So to any students out there who have done the course or who are doing the course, how are you finding it, and as a person who did not do econ for alevel do you think I will be behind and find it hard(then again I guess all degrees are hard)? Are the lectures helpful and how is the career network and what jobs do students go into?
Thanks in advance
0
reply
PenguinEmperor
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Hi, I want to know what economics at Lougborough is like.
I am currently on a gap year and achieved AAB in Maths, Biology and Psychology last year. I have applied for Human Biology at Bimringham but I am still thinking of other courses.
Due to personal circumstances I was unable to attend the open day that was held quite recently and I really wanted to go to get a better insight into the department. I tried contacting Loughborough university but no one seemed to answer?
So to any students out there who have done the course or who are doing the course, how are you finding it, and as a person who did not do econ for alevel do you think I will be behind and find it hard(then again I guess all degrees are hard)? Are the lectures helpful and how is the career network and what jobs do students go into?
Thanks in advance
Stealing the first part of this reply from something I replied to someone else before explaining what First year Pure Economics at Loughborough is like.

For Pure Economics you will do:
Microeconomics (20 credits)
Macroeconomics (20 Credits)
Quantitative Economics (20 Credits)
Data Analysis I (10 Credits)
Data Analysis II (10 Credits)
Skills for Study and Employment (10 Credits)
Then you have 30 credits of optional modules (I Picked Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Democratic Government and Political Ideologies)

Macro - It is a very big change from A levels, Lecturers are nice people, not always the easiest to understand when going through some things quickly but you as a University student are expected to go into further reading and revise everything there anyway

Micro - Very similar to A Level with just a few new topics in first year.
Quantitative Economics - You will have 3 exams and 1 coursework each being worth 25% of your grade, you can do extremely well in all the exams (100% is possible, though people mainly get them in the 2nd semester). The lecturers for this are not terrible, but the 2nd semester Lecturer is Awesome, first semester only adequate.

Data Analysis I & II are taken by a husband and wife team, with you having one each semester. Both are very friendly people who it is easy to go up to after class if you have not understood everything. A lot of the content of this you won't get immediately while listening in a lecture, but once you go over it at home and do the exercises we are given it becomes quite understandable. Both of these lecturers clearly want everyone to do well.

Skills for Study and Employment - It has a few useful lectures, however attendance is sparse with the last 8 of 12 having 17 of us, partly I feel as some stuff is padded out to try and get enough lectures for the semester. The lecturer is a very nice woman, who is easy to go up and talk to, and if you put a small amount of effort into this module you will do very well.

The only thing I have to say that is terrible are the tutorials, while I have attended 95% of them only about 10% of them have been useful. I have had PhD students who have either been condescending, clearly not knowing how to teach and trying to rush you through the required material to leave, or PhD students who clearly haven't yet become confident in teaching and especially if English isn't their first language, have not yet mastered how to speak to a room full of people.
(From what I have heard this is a problem that occurs in many departments across the UK and relates to there not being enough hours in the day for a lecturer to not only do research but teach)

All of your lectures will take place in lecture theaters with 150-300 people, tutorials normally have about 20 people in them and are in a much more classroom environment.

The University does also provide extra mathematics classes if you haven't taken them at A Level, though I can't say much about them as I didn't take them.

Now for the more personal reponse

So If you haven't done economics before you will likely need to put in a bit more effort as while the University doesn't say you need Economics, they do go very quickly over what was done at A-Level. Though I would say since the Macroeconomics component of the lectures is so different from that at A-level you would be at no real disadvantage there. For the Microeconomics lectures, those who have done Economics before have an advantage, but if you revise and work you will do fine.

Having done mathematics i'd say you would fine both the Quantitative and Data Analysis lectures very easy, they require only a bit of economic knowledge and are mainly for preparing you for second year.

For the careers network: The Economics department and Business department have their own separate careers department from the rest of the university due to so many of the students going on placements, so there are a lot of resources available for helping you throughout the year, as well as doing skills for study and Employment to work on your CV, and profiles such as LinkedIn and preparing you for group interviews.
For Placements they do like to tell us that people do get into Investment banking placements and other high paying fields. With Loughborough being a decent University going to it isn't exactly going to hurt your prospect for jobs
0
reply
Bluebell1234
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Penguinfarts)
Stealing the first part of this reply from something I replied to someone else before explaining what First year Pure Economics at Loughborough is like.

For Pure Economics you will do:
Microeconomics (20 credits)
Macroeconomics (20 Credits)
Quantitative Economics (20 Credits)
Data Analysis I (10 Credits)
Data Analysis II (10 Credits)
Skills for Study and Employment (10 Credits)
Then you have 30 credits of optional modules (I Picked Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Democratic Government and Political Ideologies)

Macro - It is a very big change from A levels, Lecturers are nice people, not always the easiest to understand when going through some things quickly but you as a University student are expected to go into further reading and revise everything there anyway

Micro - Very similar to A Level with just a few new topics in first year.
Quantitative Economics - You will have 3 exams and 1 coursework each being worth 25% of your grade, you can do extremely well in all the exams (100% is possible, though people mainly get them in the 2nd semester). The lecturers for this are not terrible, but the 2nd semester Lecturer is Awesome, first semester only adequate.

Data Analysis I & II are taken by a husband and wife team, with you having one each semester. Both are very friendly people who it is easy to go up to after class if you have not understood everything. A lot of the content of this you won't get immediately while listening in a lecture, but once you go over it at home and do the exercises we are given it becomes quite understandable. Both of these lecturers clearly want everyone to do well.

Skills for Study and Employment - It has a few useful lectures, however attendance is sparse with the last 8 of 12 having 17 of us, partly I feel as some stuff is padded out to try and get enough lectures for the semester. The lecturer is a very nice woman, who is easy to go up and talk to, and if you put a small amount of effort into this module you will do very well.

The only thing I have to say that is terrible are the tutorials, while I have attended 95% of them only about 10% of them have been useful. I have had PhD students who have either been condescending, clearly not knowing how to teach and trying to rush you through the required material to leave, or PhD students who clearly haven't yet become confident in teaching and especially if English isn't their first language, have not yet mastered how to speak to a room full of people.
(From what I have heard this is a problem that occurs in many departments across the UK and relates to there not being enough hours in the day for a lecturer to not only do research but teach)

All of your lectures will take place in lecture theaters with 150-300 people, tutorials normally have about 20 people in them and are in a much more classroom environment.

The University does also provide extra mathematics classes if you haven't taken them at A Level, though I can't say much about them as I didn't take them.

Now for the more personal reponse

So If you haven't done economics before you will likely need to put in a bit more effort as while the University doesn't say you need Economics, they do go very quickly over what was done at A-Level. Though I would say since the Macroeconomics component of the lectures is so different from that at A-level you would be at no real disadvantage there. For the Microeconomics lectures, those who have done Economics before have an advantage, but if you revise and work you will do fine.

Having done mathematics i'd say you would fine both the Quantitative and Data Analysis lectures very easy, they require only a bit of economic knowledge and are mainly for preparing you for second year.

For the careers network: The Economics department and Business department have their own separate careers department from the rest of the university due to so many of the students going on placements, so there are a lot of resources available for helping you throughout the year, as well as doing skills for study and Employment to work on your CV, and profiles such as LinkedIn and preparing you for group interviews.
For Placements they do like to tell us that people do get into Investment banking placements and other high paying fields. With Loughborough being a decent University going to it isn't exactly going to hurt your prospect for jobs
Hi thank you for replying,
So what kind of maths is involved in the quantitative and data analysis modules? e.g is it very similar to maths alevel like the differentiation, integration etc?

Are you thinking of doing the placement? Where do students do it mostly if you know like I know it mentions a few on websites but theres nothing in detail about what the roles actually involve. I am assuming you have finished first year and probably don't know but still wanted to ask?

How do you find loughbororugh overall? I have heard things like it is too sporty and like yes I like sports but I am not brilliant at them (lol) so is there anything else? Also what is the girl to boy ration doing the course. Are there any volunteering opportunities?
Does first year count? How many people in the lectures? Would you suggest those optional modules or do you regret picking them ? Which ones are popular and any reason why?
Which accommmodation would you recommend staying in?
0
reply
PenguinEmperor
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by Bluebell1234)
Hi thank you for replying,
So what kind of maths is involved in the quantitative and data analysis modules? e.g is it very similar to maths alevel like the differentiation, integration etc?

Are you thinking of doing the placement? Where do students do it mostly if you know like I know it mentions a few on websites but theres nothing in detail about what the roles actually involve. I am assuming you have finished first year and probably don't know but still wanted to ask?

How do you find Loughborough overall? I have heard things like it is too sporty and like yes I like sports but I am not brilliant at them (lol) so is there anything else? Also what is the girl to boy ration doing the course. Are there any volunteering opportunities?
Does first year count? How many people in the lectures? Would you suggest those optional modules or do you regret picking them ? Which ones are popular and any reason why?
Which accommmodation would you recommend staying in?
So yeah you get to do some really simple differentiation, Integration, exponentials etc all in the Second semester. You won't really learn anything new maths wise in the second semester but you actually will learn a couple new things like doing matrices in QE and regressions in Data Analysis in the first semester.

For placements, I am contemplating it, for where people actually go it would be difficult to say as people go to such a wide range of companies, lots of different banks, the government economic service etc.

How I find Loughborough, I mean if you want to do sports you can, if you don't you don't have to, there are sports to get involved with at any range of ability at Loughborough. For the gender ratio.... it is a sporting university and it is economics the number of males to females is rather high, but in lectures you don't really pay attention to that.

There are tonnes of volunteering opportunities at Loughborough, and it is easy to get involved in RAG through your halls, they do a lot of different things (Dog walking, going out with buckets to London to fund raise for charities, running events to get people signed up for bone marrow transplants etc), with a lot of them being on Wednesdays when lectures don't go past 1pm, admittedly they all normally start before 1pm which meant I wasn't able to get involved in much this past year as I always had lectures from 9am-1pm on a Wednesday .

There are also a decent number of societies, not that many that relate to doing economics much but there is Enactus which is like Young Enterprise just at University level, as well as a financial society, but that is more about getting companies in to give talks about placements and jobs etc.

Also there are plenty of student roles, being a course rep, student ambassador, lots of different roles in Halls and the one thing I am actually doing next year is being a Peer Mentor for first years.

First year doesn't count towards your final grade, it does however matter if you want to do a placement as that will be the only result they get. Lectures are meant to have between 150-300 people, though everyone attending only happens a couple times throughout the year when we are being told what will be on the coursework/exam.

For optional modules I would not worry too much about what I think is good, just choose what you think you will enjoy, it is the first year and you might as well enjoy yourself All the modules I guess are fairly popular, I don't really know that any are less popular than others. (Although sociology was ridiculously easy)

For Accommodation it really just matters what your budget is and then you can choose the best one for your preferences catering/self-catered and en-suite/shared, as the quality of the accommodation is dependent on how much you spend. I ended up in Hazlerigg-Rutland as I could not survive on catered food with how fussy I am / how much I like to cook and I decided I wanted en-suite in first year as I wouldn't know who I was sharing with.
1
reply
username2750226
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Penguinfarts)
Stealing the first part of this reply from something I replied to someone else before explaining what First year Pure Economics at Loughborough is like.

For Pure Economics you will do:
Microeconomics (20 credits)
Macroeconomics (20 Credits)
Quantitative Economics (20 Credits)
Data Analysis I (10 Credits)
Data Analysis II (10 Credits)
Skills for Study and Employment (10 Credits)
Then you have 30 credits of optional modules (I Picked Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Democratic Government and Political Ideologies)

Macro - It is a very big change from A levels, Lecturers are nice people, not always the easiest to understand when going through some things quickly but you as a University student are expected to go into further reading and revise everything there anyway

Micro - Very similar to A Level with just a few new topics in first year.
Quantitative Economics - You will have 3 exams and 1 coursework each being worth 25% of your grade, you can do extremely well in all the exams (100% is possible, though people mainly get them in the 2nd semester). The lecturers for this are not terrible, but the 2nd semester Lecturer is Awesome, first semester only adequate.

Data Analysis I & II are taken by a husband and wife team, with you having one each semester. Both are very friendly people who it is easy to go up to after class if you have not understood everything. A lot of the content of this you won't get immediately while listening in a lecture, but once you go over it at home and do the exercises we are given it becomes quite understandable. Both of these lecturers clearly want everyone to do well.

Skills for Study and Employment - It has a few useful lectures, however attendance is sparse with the last 8 of 12 having 17 of us, partly I feel as some stuff is padded out to try and get enough lectures for the semester. The lecturer is a very nice woman, who is easy to go up and talk to, and if you put a small amount of effort into this module you will do very well.

The only thing I have to say that is terrible are the tutorials, while I have attended 95% of them only about 10% of them have been useful. I have had PhD students who have either been condescending, clearly not knowing how to teach and trying to rush you through the required material to leave, or PhD students who clearly haven't yet become confident in teaching and especially if English isn't their first language, have not yet mastered how to speak to a room full of people.
(From what I have heard this is a problem that occurs in many departments across the UK and relates to there not being enough hours in the day for a lecturer to not only do research but teach)

All of your lectures will take place in lecture theaters with 150-300 people, tutorials normally have about 20 people in them and are in a much more classroom environment.

The University does also provide extra mathematics classes if you haven't taken them at A Level, though I can't say much about them as I didn't take them.

Now for the more personal reponse

So If you haven't done economics before you will likely need to put in a bit more effort as while the University doesn't say you need Economics, they do go very quickly over what was done at A-Level. Though I would say since the Macroeconomics component of the lectures is so different from that at A-level you would be at no real disadvantage there. For the Microeconomics lectures, those who have done Economics before have an advantage, but if you revise and work you will do fine.

Having done mathematics i'd say you would fine both the Quantitative and Data Analysis lectures very easy, they require only a bit of economic knowledge and are mainly for preparing you for second year.

For the careers network: The Economics department and Business department have their own separate careers department from the rest of the university due to so many of the students going on placements, so there are a lot of resources available for helping you throughout the year, as well as doing skills for study and Employment to work on your CV, and profiles such as LinkedIn and preparing you for group interviews.
For Placements they do like to tell us that people do get into Investment banking placements and other high paying fields. With Loughborough being a decent University going to it isn't exactly going to hurt your prospect for jobs
Not OP but thank you for taking the time to write this, really appreciate it and its really helpful, thanks!
0
reply
PenguinEmperor
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
(Original post by lw8)
Not OP but thank you for taking the time to write this, really appreciate it and its really helpful, thanks!
No problem, if you ever want to know something else feel free to message me.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Surrey
    Postgraduate Open Afternoon Postgraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19
  • University of Bristol
    Undergraduate Open Afternoon Undergraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19
  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Day - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19

Would you turn to a teacher if you were being bullied?

Yes (47)
25.82%
No (135)
74.18%

Watched Threads

View All