jennifugh
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I love, love, love English. What are the best ways to revise English and improve?
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Student2416
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(Original post by jennifugh)
I love, love, love English. What are the best ways to revise English and improve?
There are 2 different GCSE English courses you can take but they are both underpinned by similar skills. They key for succeeding at English Language is being able to both read and interpret a range of texts as well as writing for a set purpose and audience. For the readings sections you need to be able to analyse language devices, analyse structural devices and also be able to evaluate and compare attitudes between different texts. This is the case for AQA anyway. As long as you have the skills to tackle these questions then you can't go wrong. For the writing section you need to have almost flawless SPG as this is heavily weighted now as well as writing a strong piece of writing with a good range of ideas and devices used for effect. To improve all you can do is practice really.

For English Literature lower ability students fall into the trap of just retelling the plot of the text rather analysing, in order to succeed here you must be able to explore layers of meaning and critically analyse relevant quotations that links to the question, you also need to be able to relate your essays to the contexts in which they were written, the effect devices have on the audience/reader and also the writers' intentions.
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jennifugh
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(Original post by Student2416)
There are 2 different GCSE English courses you can take but they are both underpinned by similar skills. They key for succeeding at English Language is being able to both read and interpret a range of texts as well as writing for a set purpose and audience. For the readings sections you need to be able to analyse language devices, analyse structural devices and also be able to evaluate and compare attitudes between different texts. This is the case for AQA anyway. As long as you have the skills to tackle these questions then you can't go wrong. For the writing section you need to have almost flawless SPG as this is heavily weighted now as well as writing a strong piece of writing with a good range of ideas and devices used for effect. To improve all you can do is practice really.

For English Literature lower ability students fall into the trap of just retelling the plot of the text rather analysing, in order to succeed here you must be able to explore layers of meaning and critically analyse relevant quotations that links to the question, you also need to be able to relate your essays to the contexts in which they were written, the effect devices have on the audience/reader and also the writers' intentions.
Thank you so much I think this will definitely help
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anonoymous1234
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You need to be constantly practising exam questions and get you teachers to mark and give feedback as much as possible!
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whoknowsreally
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hey, it's nice to hear somebody has a passion for english. it's a great subject that can take you many great places in terms of exceeding in my english GCSE's, these are the tips i followed:

- read, a lot. the more texts you read, the more words you learn, the more you become familiar with punctuation, literary devices, structure and form. pick up books, vary genres and time frames, make reading a passion, it will really help you in not only your reading and speaking ability, but your ability to write.
- practice creative writing. you can find writing prompts online - they usually consist of one sentence, and you are challenged to write an entire creative writing piece around that one sentence. this helps expand your imaginative ability and bring you out of your comfort zone, which you need; many people in writing stick to one particular genre that they enjoy, but this just will not help. you spend all your time writing little love stories and then open up your english paper to see a question asking you to write a newspaper article, you'll struggle. practice different things even if you are not necessarily in love with them.
- look at past mark schemes. you will learn quickly how examiners mark, what they like and don't like, what type of answer gets you the highest marks etc. this will mold your writing into the highest level as you will know what they are looking for. furthermore, look at past papers, so you know what to expect.
-in literature, annotate your book as you read it, and start early. highlight anything seemingly important from your very first read. differentiate and extract the key themes throughout the book. this way, they will stick out in your head right from the start, and you will know them as if they are your own last name by the time the exam comes around.
- finally, learn the key literary devices. everything from the simple stuff - metaphors, similies, personification...people quite commonly see these as simple and so neglect them, but you need to know them like the back of your hand. exam stress can do wonders to your memory. also, learn the really high level stuff - semantic field, archaic structure, etc. learn a lot on form and structure specifically as these areas can easily catch people out.

good luck, and i wish you the best!!
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jennifugh
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(Original post by anonoymous1234)
You need to be constantly practising exam questions and get you teachers to mark and give feedback as much as possible!
Thank you, I think I'll start trying some in Summer
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jennifugh
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
hey, it's nice to hear somebody has a passion for english. it's a great subject that can take you many great places in terms of exceeding in my english GCSE's, these are the tips i followed:

- read, a lot. the more texts you read, the more words you learn, the more you become familiar with punctuation, literary devices, structure and form. pick up books, vary genres and time frames, make reading a passion, it will really help you in not only your reading and speaking ability, but your ability to write.
- practice creative writing. you can find writing prompts online - they usually consist of one sentence, and you are challenged to write an entire creative writing piece around that one sentence. this helps expand your imaginative ability and bring you out of your comfort zone, which you need; many people in writing stick to one particular genre that they enjoy, but this just will not help. you spend all your time writing little love stories and then open up your english paper to see a question asking you to write a newspaper article, you'll struggle. practice different things even if you are not necessarily in love with them.
- look at past mark schemes. you will learn quickly how examiners mark, what they like and don't like, what type of answer gets you the highest marks etc. this will mold your writing into the highest level as you will know what they are looking for. furthermore, look at past papers, so you know what to expect.
-in literature, annotate your book as you read it, and start early. highlight anything seemingly important from your very first read. differentiate and extract the key themes throughout the book. this way, they will stick out in your head right from the start, and you will know them as if they are your own last name by the time the exam comes around.
- finally, learn the key literary devices. everything from the simple stuff - metaphors, similies, personification...people quite commonly see these as simple and so neglect them, but you need to know them like the back of your hand. exam stress can do wonders to your memory. also, learn the really high level stuff - semantic field, archaic structure, etc. learn a lot on form and structure specifically as these areas can easily catch people out.

good luck, and i wish you the best!!
Thank you for taking the time to type out so much! I think what you have said will truly help me One small question, what is archaic structure as I can't seem to find an exact definition online?
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