NickC96
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I'm going into my final year studying Physics at University, and am really interested in doing a Chemistry degree after I have graduated, however I do not have an A-Level in Chemistry. Ignoring problems with finance is there any reason why I could not apply to do a Chemistry degree?
0
reply
Cubone-r
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
Why would you want to spend money and time doing a second degree?
0
reply
NickC96
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by mangatardallys)
Why would you want to spend money and time doing a second degree?
Cheers for the helpful reply, I want to.
0
reply
Cubone-r
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by NickC96)
Cheers for the helpful reply, I want to.
No problem mate, any time! :gthumb:
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
It is actually a relevant question - what exactly does the chemistry degree allow you to do, that a physics degree won't? This is something the universities are going to want to see evidence that you've considered in e.g. your personal statement, as they aren't going to just arbitrarily accept you.

If you have a valid, well thought out reason for pursuing a chemistry undergrad degree, as opposed to a masters and/or doctorate with chemical and physical elements building on your undergraduate degree in physics, then in theory nothing should prevent you from doing so....as long as you take and pass to a high level A-level Chemistry and find a way to fund the course.
0
reply
NickC96
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by artful_lounger)
It is actually a relevant question - what exactly does the chemistry degree allow you to do, that a physics degree won't? This is something the universities are going to want to see evidence that you've considered in e.g. your personal statement, as they aren't going to just arbitrarily accept you.

If you have a valid, well thought out reason for pursuing a chemistry undergrad degree, as opposed to a masters and/or doctorate with chemical and physical elements building on your undergraduate degree in physics, then in theory nothing should prevent you from doing so....as long as you take and pass to a high level A-level Chemistry and find a way to fund the course.
You people are like politicians with your answers, right so the answer is I need an A-Level in Chemistry? The fact I'll have a degree in Physics doesn't change that??
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by NickC96)
You people are like politicians with your answers, right so the answer is I need an A-Level in Chemistry? The fact I'll have a degree in Physics doesn't change that??
Well since a physics degree won't teach you anything about organic reaction mechanisms yes, you'll need A-level Chemistry.
0
reply
NickC96
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Well since a physics degree won't teach you anything about organic reaction mechanisms yes, you'll need A-level Chemistry.
I'm in bits 😂
If you don't know what you're talking about then don't try and be smart 😂😂
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by NickC96)
I'm in bits 😂
If you don't know what you're talking about then don't try and be smart 😂😂
Was there a point to this thread other than trying and failing to mock the people providing you answers when they aren't the ones you want?

A-level Chemistry isn't an arbitrary requirement for a Chemistry degree, they expect you to know the material before you begin on the course and there is little to no time to catch up, particularly given how lab intensive Chemistry is. On that note they also need the practical endorsement for A-level Chemistry to have been passed because it IS a fundamentally lab based science, moreso than any other STEM subject. You need to have the familiarity with the relevant areas of analytical chemistry - specifically knowledge of the relevant apparatus and core chemical procedures, before they let you into the Chemistry lab in the first week of the course.

The only one that doesn't know what they're talking about is you, but this has apparently escaped your notice.
0
reply
Klix88
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by NickC96)
is there any reason why I could not apply to do a Chemistry degree?
Without A Level Chemistry, you need to look for a 4 year undergrad degree with Foundation year.

Example:
https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?...018#admissions
1
reply
aware1
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 years ago
#11
(Original post by Klix88)
Without A Level Chemistry, you need to look for a 4 year undergrad degree with Foundation year.

Example:
https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?...018#admissions
This, or prepare to struggle alot. My friend is doing a Chem degree, he said what he learnt at A level was invaluable and helped greatly when learning about the subject. Everyone on his course did Chemistry A level, it was a requirement.
0
reply
Snufkin
Badges: 21
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
You'll need to study part-time to get a tuition fee loan for a second degree, so you might as well study with the Open University (their Chemistry degree has no entry requirements).

http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q64-che
0
reply
username2228735
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 years ago
#13
Chemistry A-level will almost certainly be a requirement. I would recommend doing it on the side and applying to universities in the fall with a predicted grade.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think mandatory Relationships and Sex Education in secondary schools is a good idea?

Yes (336)
83.79%
No (65)
16.21%

Watched Threads

View All