Maths/FM Modules - How Long Did It Take You?

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brainzistheword
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As a lot of you will have just done your Maths exams and there are some great threads where many of you have mentioned self teaching or getting ahead, I thought it might be useful to get current or past mathematicians to share their timetable and get an idea of how long it took them to study each module.

So basically, I'm interested in:

How many lessons did you have a week?
How long was each lesson?

How many hours did you commit to studying outside of the classroom?

Overall, how long do you think/know it took you to get through all of the content on each module? (This doesn't have to include revision of the topics, just the point at which you finished the last topic).

Any contributions are greatly appreciated
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brainzistheword
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By the way, I'm not trying to use this as a comparison between people or anything, it is purely so those that are self-teaching can gauge how much time they should be spending on different modules, though I completely understand this will vary from person to person
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NotNotBatman
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I self taught FP2 and FP3 during the summer and completely self taught M1 during the school year, at school my teacher wasn't good at all.

I had 4 lessons per week, each 50 minutes, not enough imo.

During the start of the year I did lots, like 2 hours a day of maths outside the classroom, but this declined throughout the year and for some modules, such as fp3 I did no revision for a month and a half - I don't recommend this.

FP2 took 10 days with a few breaks days.
FP3 took a month + a bit longer to fully understand vectors.
M1 took about a month as well.

I'm not sure how to say how long it took without the revision of each topic, as I revise the topics as I go along, but for each topic I spend 1 day going through all the concepts, so if you do it like that, I would say 1 topic per day and however long that takes.
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RBP_98
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I had 11 lessons, each of 50 minutes (more than needed, spent at least 3 per week doing AEA or maths challenge stuff)

Covered FP1,2,3, M2, D1, S1 in this time and I self taught M3 (the hardest of the 7 in my opinion)

FP1, FP2, M2, S2 took about 4 months (studying at the same time) and then D1 and FP3 took about 2 months (again, studying at the same time). The rest of the year was just revision and other stuff (STEP, Oxbridge prep, AEA etc)

M3 took me about 3 months to learn and thoroughly revise, with about 4 hours of revision per week (way too much I know, but I think I got full marks so worth it! As a side note I know someone who started in March and still got full marks in M3)
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Sanjeet74
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
As a lot of you will have just done your Maths exams and there are some great threads where many of you have mentioned self teaching or getting ahead, I thought it might be useful to get current or past mathematicians to share their timetable and get an idea of how long it took them to study each module.

So basically, I'm interested in:

How many lessons did you have a week?
How long was each lesson?

How many hours did you commit to studying outside of the classroom?

Overall, how long do you think/know it took you to get through all of the content on each module? (This doesn't have to include revision of the topics, just the point at which you finished the last topic).

Any contributions are greatly appreciated
AS+A2 maths about 9 core lessons/fortnight and 3 applied
Times are how long it took to learn content, can take longer/shorter though. all in ur own ability and workload. Self taught fp1-3 and m3-m5
c1 - for a first intro to alevel, just take time gcse->c1 harder than c1->c2 imo though. 3 days
c2 - introduces trig, bit more interesting than c1 5 days
m1 - no mechanics to mechanics can be tricky for some but m1->m2 etc easier than no mechanics to m1 4 days
A2-
c3 - small step up from c3, lots of trig, a week
c4- most interesting normal maths module imo mainly integration, a week
m2- not much harder than m1 but more interesting, smaller, extending ideas, 3 days
FM-
fp1- AS module so difficulty not bad at all 3 days
m3- step up from m2, can be rather tricky especially simple harmonic motion at first 1-2 weeks
fp2- very interesting but can get tricky in parts, other parts not so much, took me 2 weeks
fp3- harder than fp2 imo, vectors and matrices can get annoying and pretty difficult 1-2 weeks
**The hardest 2**
m4- most is fine however there is also a **** of a chapter being relative motion which is very confusing imo lots of geometry. 2-3 weeks
m5- the god of modules, expects strong background and uses fp3, do last. by far hardest for me. 1 month
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by Sanjeet74)
AS+A2 maths about 9 core lessons/fortnight and 3 applied
Times are how long it took to learn content, can take longer/shorter though. all in ur own ability and workload. Self taught fp1-3 and m3-m5
c1 - for a first intro to alevel, just take time gcse->c1 harder than c1->c2 imo though. 3 days
c2 - introduces trig, bit more interesting than c1 5 days
m1 - no mechanics to mechanics can be tricky for some but m1->m2 etc easier than no mechanics to m1 4 days
A2-
c3 - small step up from c3, lots of trig, a week
c4- most interesting normal maths module imo mainly integration, a week
m2- not much harder than m1 but more interesting, smaller, extending ideas, 3 days
FM-
fp1- AS module so difficulty not bad at all 3 days
m3- step up from m2, can be rather tricky especially simple harmonic motion at first 1-2 weeks
fp2- very interesting but can get tricky in parts, other parts not so much, took me 2 weeks
fp3- harder than fp2 imo, vectors and matrices can get annoying and pretty difficult 1-2 weeks
**The hardest 2**
m4- most is fine however there is also a **** of a chapter being relative motion which is very confusing imo lots of geometry. 2-3 weeks
m5- the god of modules, expects strong background and uses fp3, do last. by far hardest for me. 1 month
Thanks for this - when you're saying it took 5 days / 3 days - this is by doing how many hours of study (obviously it will be different in each case, but do you have a rough estimate)?
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brainzistheword
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NotNotBatman RBP_98 Thanks for these!

How did you find modules like C1-C4?
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Sanjeet74
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
Thanks for this - when you're saying it took 5 days / 3 days - this is by doing how many hours of study (obviously it will be different in each case, but do you have a rough estimate)?
yeah sorry should of said, about 5-7 hours a day roughly some less
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by Sanjeet74)
yeah sorry should of said, about 5-7 hours a day roughly some less
Ah thank you! You've been very helpful
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S.G.
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
As a lot of you will have just done your Maths exams and there are some great threads where many of you have mentioned self teaching or getting ahead, I thought it might be useful to get current or past mathematicians to share their timetable and get an idea of how long it took them to study each module.

So basically, I'm interested in:

How many lessons did you have a week?
How long was each lesson?

How many hours did you commit to studying outside of the classroom?

Overall, how long do you think/know it took you to get through all of the content on each module? (This doesn't have to include revision of the topics, just the point at which you finished the last topic).

Any contributions are greatly appreciated
I did C1-C4, FP1-FP3, M1, S1, D1, M2, S2, D2.

I did the AS modules plus C3 in Year 12. Took me from September to February.
M1 is definitely the smallest module, followed by FP1. C1, C2 are straight foward. D1 is probably slightly bigger and annoying because of algorithms etc. S1 is standard as well

I did the rest in Year 13. Started in September, finished in March.
FP2 by far the biggest module. Absolutely trumps FP3 in terms of content. FP3 is the smallest. C4 is fairly easy, not too big. D2 is a big module. M2 is smallest module and S2 is decent as well.

This was at school though where I had maths 4 out of 5 days. 7.5 hours a week
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NotNotBatman
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
NotNotBatman RBP_98 Thanks for these!

How did you find modules like C1-C4?
At first I found C1 difficult, though a lot of it is GCSE recap, I didn't learn a lot of the gcse content, so it was new to me. I revised incredibly hard, I mean like 8 hours a day outside of class and 14 hrs on weekends (this was in September !) and somehow I still got a D in the first mock, but it got easier and there wasn't a question that I wouldn't know how to answer - although I still made silly mistakes.

I think there comes a point in maths where it clicks and everything is understood quite easily from then, so nothing in c2 felt difficult iirc. Although I was wrong after getting lower than I wanted in the exam.

Somehow C3 and C4 wasn't bad; I think it was more to do with finding a good revision technique rather than the content.
Integration and vectors confused me for a while, but I ended up doing every single question I could possibly find on integration and there wasn't an integration question I couldn't do. So, it requires a lot of practice, but once you've got it, everything that follows becomes easier.
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by NotNotBatman)
At first I found C1 difficult, though a lot of it is GCSE recap, I didn't learn a lot of the gcse content, so it was new to me. I revised incredibly hard, I mean like 8 hours a day outside of class and 14 hrs on weekends (this was in September !) and somehow I still got a D in the first mock, but it got easier and there wasn't a question that I wouldn't know how to answer - although I still made silly mistakes.

I think there comes a point in maths where it clicks and everything is understood quite easily from then, so nothing in c2 felt difficult iirc. Although I was wrong after getting lower than I wanted in the exam.

Somehow C3 and C4 wasn't bad; I think it was more to do with finding a good revision technique rather than the content.
Integration and vectors confused me for a while, but I ended up doing every single question I could possibly find on integration and there wasn't an integration question I couldn't do. So, it requires a lot of practice, but once you've got it, everything that follows becomes easier.
It sounds like you certainly put the hours in! Thank you for your detailed responses too

I've started doing C1 and I'm up to simultaneous equations after around 10 hours' work though I haven't done much re-capping of topics, because I plan to revisit everything once I've done a fair few chapters
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NotNotBatman
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
It sounds like you certainly put the hours in! Thank you for your detailed responses too

I've started doing C1 and I'm up to simultaneous equations after around 10 hours' work though I haven't done much re-capping of topics, because I plan to revisit everything once I've done a fair few chapters
Nice, I've looked at your profile and it seems your gcses were very good, so you should definitely be able to get through AS maths. One thing I have to say is make sure you know the content well, because at GCSE you can get like 65% in maths and get an A, without knowing a lot of the content and about 80% and get an A*, but for c1 an A is usually over 80% and the same for c2, so there's no cutting corners.
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by NotNotBatman)
Nice, I've looked at your profile and it seems your gcses were very good, so you should definitely be able to get through AS maths. One thing I have to say is make sure you know the content well, because at GCSE you can get like 65% in maths and get an A, without knowing a lot of the content and about 80% and get an A*, but for c1 an A is usually over 80% and the same for c2, so there's no cutting corners.
Thank you! That is very good advice and I'll take it on board. I want to make sure I have the same 'confidence' as I did when I went into my GCSE exam, because it meant I could just see each question as a puzzle rather than having to work out which methods to use and how to solve them. I believe I got 92% and 96% in the GCSE exams, so if I can replicate this with enough practice then I'll consider it a success
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RBP_98
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
NotNotBatman RBP_98 Thanks for these!

How did you find modules like C1-C4?
TBH I found C1-4 easy (always been good at pure maths), I only found FP2, FP3 and M3 'difficult' out of all 13 I did. But just putting about 15 hours per week extra in when doing maths and further maths means you have plenty of time to get to grips with the material and then get a decent amount of practice in
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by RBP_98)
TBH I found C1-4 easy (always been good at pure maths), I only found FP2, FP3 and M3 'difficult' out of all 13 I did. But just putting about 15 hours per week extra in when doing maths and further maths means you have plenty of time to get to grips with the material and then get a decent amount of practice in
Ah okay I know I definitely want to put the practice in, so it's just a case of dedicating the time
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RBP_98
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
Ah okay I know I definitely want to put the practice in, so it's just a case of dedicating the time
That's all it is, the only people I know who have failed maths/further maths are the ones who didn't put the work in and let stuff they didn't understand pile up. Put the effort in and you will be rewarded
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black1blade
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So in year 11 we had 3 1:15 lesson a week for all 30 something weeks of school and we did c1,2 and s1. This year we had 4 1:15 lessons a week and did c3,4 and m1. Next year we are gonna have 8 1 hour lessons and cover fp1-3, m2 (already started), s2 and d1. This year we actually finished the content about march I want to say so the rest of the year was just past papers. We have started m2 this year and I'm enjoying the coefficient of restitution stuff but the projectiles is utterly boring and we've already spent twice as long as I would feel like I need to on them.
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by black1blade)
So in year 11 we had 3 1:15 lesson a week for all 30 something weeks of school and we did c1,2 and s1. This year we had 4 1:15 lessons a week and did c3,4 and m1. Next year we are gonna have 8 1 hour lessons and cover fp1-3, m2 (already started), s2 and d1. This year we actually finished the content about march I want to say so the rest of the year was just past papers. We have started m2 this year and I'm enjoying the coefficient of restitution stuff but the projectiles is utterly boring and we've already spent twice as long as I would feel like I need to on them.
Thanks for replying! And you must have been good to start some modules in Year 11 (we were never given that opportunity but I'd have loved it).
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
Thanks for replying! And you must have been good to start some modules in Year 11 (we were never given that opportunity but I'd have loved it).
Yeah I was luckily recognized by my teacher in year 8, placed in fast track so had to do a couple lunch times a week in year 9. Did gcse in year 10 then started a-level in year 11. Definitely a lot nicer and more easing into rather than doing all of normal maths in year 12 then further in year 13.
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