anna231a
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I was emailed yesterday (Friday) to attend an interview on Monday. The interview is going to include a mini 20 minute teaching session on the subject of the reactivity of metals. Only 10 Year 8 pupils which is cool, "mixed ability" which could
mean anything.

I am flumoxed about what to put in the lesson - ideally I'd have some metals
and some reagents and there would be a practical then some results analysis. I won't have time for that and I can't very well waltz into the school on Monday
morning and tell them I need "x number of test tubes, x amounts of acid, x amounts of these metals etc.".

So, my plan so far:
Introduce myself
Have a couple of metal items, a couple of non-metal. Ask them to tell me how
they know whether item is metal or not Talk a bit about properties of metals.
Show them periodic table and ask them to point out the metals.
Talk to them about how position in the periodic table gives information about how reactive a metal is and why - so alkali metals are very reactive because...... etc.
Give them a reactivity series of metals with some names missing. Give them
some cards with information about reactions of metal described (e.g. reacts
explosively with water). Pupils write names of metals in the right place.
Finish off by relating reactivity series back to periodic table.
Have some questions ready - white board answers - about the reactivity series in case I've got time to fill at the end.

Critique and ideas for improvement very much appreciated.

thank youl
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Reality Check
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(Original post by anna231a)
I was emailed yesterday (Friday) to attend an interview on Monday. The interview is going to include a mini 20 minute teaching session on the subject of the reactivity of metals. Only 10 Year 8 pupils which is cool, "mixed ability" which could
mean anything.

I am flumoxed about what to put in the lesson - ideally I'd have some metals
and some reagents and there would be a practical then some results analysis. I won't have time for that and I can't very well waltz into the school on Monday
morning and tell them I need "x number of test tubes, x amounts of acid, x amounts of these metals etc.".

So, my plan so far:
Introduce myself
Have a couple of metal items, a couple of non-metal. Ask them to tell me how
they know whether item is metal or not Talk a bit about properties of metals.
Show them periodic table and ask them to point out the metals.
Talk to them about how position in the periodic table gives information about how reactive a metal is and why - so alkali metals are very reactive because...... etc.
Give them a reactivity series of metals with some names missing. Give them
some cards with information about reactions of metal described (e.g. reacts
explosively with water). Pupils write names of metals in the right place.
Finish off by relating reactivity series back to periodic table.
Have some questions ready - white board answers - about the reactivity series in case I've got time to fill at the end.

Critique and ideas for improvement very much appreciated.

thank youl
OK...
So, first thing. Have you ever done a lesson plan before - do you know what goes into one?
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anna231a
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Yes but they are usually part of a scheme of work where I know the class, their ability, what they've learned previously etc. Also, as a Pgce student I'm not sure they will be expecting a fully formed lesson plan. But I may be wrong. A lesson plan's not really the hard bit - it's what I can do in 20 minutes to teach idea of reactivity of metals without me yakking away for the whole time.
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username1799249
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(Original post by anna231a)
I was emailed yesterday (Friday) to attend an interview on Monday. The interview is going to include a mini 20 minute teaching session on the subject of the reactivity of metals. Only 10 Year 8 pupils which is cool, "mixed ability" which could
mean anything.

I am flumoxed about what to put in the lesson - ideally I'd have some metals
and some reagents and there would be a practical then some results analysis. I won't have time for that and I can't very well waltz into the school on Monday
morning and tell them I need "x number of test tubes, x amounts of acid, x amounts of these metals etc.".

So, my plan so far:
Introduce myself
Have a couple of metal items, a couple of non-metal. Ask them to tell me how
they know whether item is metal or not Talk a bit about properties of metals.
Show them periodic table and ask them to point out the metals.
Talk to them about how position in the periodic table gives information about how reactive a metal is and why - so alkali metals are very reactive because...... etc.
Give them a reactivity series of metals with some names missing. Give them
some cards with information about reactions of metal described (e.g. reacts
explosively with water). Pupils write names of metals in the right place.
Finish off by relating reactivity series back to periodic table.
Have some questions ready - white board answers - about the reactivity series in case I've got time to fill at the end.

Critique and ideas for improvement very much appreciated.

thank youl
Sounds like you are onto the right idea. But to give your lesson structure, decide what you want them to learn. What is the nugget of information that they will know once you have taught that they didn't know before? Then ask yourself how you will find out if they have learned it.

Your 20 minute lesson should start with you introducing what they are going to learn followed by a little bit of teaching / you talking / instructing. Then give the students at least 10 minutes to do something i.e. an experiment or a worksheet or a piece of written work. Then spend 2 - 3 minutes asking questions or getting them to fill in some sort of quiz sheet that you can use to assess if they have learned what you have taught. Use the time when they are working to move around the students to find out if they understand what they need to do, answer questions and offer help.

Good luck!
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bob0079
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Good luck, hope it goes well. Looks like a bit long to me. Keep it simple.

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anna231a
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So I delivered my mini lesson today. I dumped the periodic table stuff and made a clearer lesson aim at the beginning which was to produce a reactivity series. Most of the lesson was pupils making a reactivity series from a set of statements about metals reacting with water. I let them work in pairs and there was some good interaction. Head of science observing said she liked my activity.

Was offered place on Teach Direct teaching chemistry starting in September 🙂
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