Which programming language should I learn?? Watch

Dirasa
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I'd like to know what code language I need to learn if I'm interested in creating websites or developing apps for IOS or Android.
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Integer
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Why don't you google it?
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study beats
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(Original post by Dirasa)
I'd like to know what code language I need to learn if I'm interested in creating websites or developing apps for IOS or Android.
for websites learn html and javascript

for apps learn java
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UWS
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Websites you'll need HTML, JS, PHP and CSS. Thankfully Bootstrap can help you with most of that.
http://getbootstrap.com/

Android apps are done in Java mainly. Each page is styled using XML. PHP needed in some cases.

For iOS you're looking at Swift programming language.

Tiger Rag one for IT and technology?
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Tiger Rag
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(Original post by UWS)
Websites you'll need HTML, JS, PHP and CSS. Thankfully Bootstrap can help you with most of that.
http://getbootstrap.com/

Android apps are done in Java mainly. Each page is styled using XML. PHP needed in some cases.

For iOS you're looking at Swift programming language.

Tiger Rag one for IT and technology?
Moved to Webmaster, Code and Dev,
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artful_lounger
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Python
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Tootles
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(Original post by Dirasa)
I'd like to know what code language I need to learn if I'm interested in creating websites or developing apps for IOS or Android.
First you need to make your mind up which of these you'll be doing.
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Tootles
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(Original post by study beats)
for websites learn html and javascript

for apps learn java
iOS uses Objective-C and Android uses C++. Java's just a red herring.
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by Tootles)
Android uses C++. Java's just a red herring.
And? Using NDK is not going to be a particularly brilliant idea for someone who doesn't know what languages are even used for the OP's original scope of options is it?

But then NDK use is usually confined to large teams or to masochists incensed on reinventing the wheel (or both, Game Devs *cough*).
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s4b3rt00th
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(Original post by Dirasa)
I'd like to know what code language I need to learn if I'm interested in creating websites or developing apps for IOS or Android.
For front-end website development: HTML, CSS and JavaScript. For back-end website development: HTML, JavaScript , Python/Ruby/PHP/Java (and many more to choose from) and mySQL.

For developing Android and IOS apps, there's loads of things you can use but I use Xamerin (with C#).

What is your goal? A lot of this depends on what you are trying to accomplish.
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Zargabaath
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Java for mobile stuff, Javascript (HTML 5) for web stuff. Python and SQL are both also good picks for web stuff.
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gareths
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for pc stuff - as in Windows use HTML, C++, C# or .NET
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ahkansha
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JavaScript falls into category, along with python and ruby, still teach first language is c++, java
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The_Big_E
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I don't do Android or iOS apps, but I hear C# with Xamarin Studio is a common choice for Android developers. Objective-C is the iOS standard, but you can also use Swift, which seems easier to learn than the former.

As for web development, for front-end you'll need to know the obvious HTML/CSS and at least a bit of Javascript. I'm still quite new to Javascript, but I suggest first learning vanilla Javascript then branching out to jQuery and front-end frameworks/libraries like Angular or React. If you want to use Javascript for the back-end, you can also use Node.

Once you're experienced with HTML and CSS, you'll want to try learn some preprocessors like HAML and SASS to shorten your development time and make your code nice and clean. Though this isn't a must.

As for back-end, there's many options here. The key to starting out with web development is not to try do everything yourself, most of the time there will be some existing framework out there which has what you need, and has been tested for functionality and security better than any code you could write as a beginner.

I personally learnt Ruby as a general purpose programming language, but once I got into web development, I noticed that there are so many frameworks in Ruby, namely Rails, Sinatra and Jekyll. I suggest starting out with Rails if you're going down the Ruby path. The only problem with Rails is that a lot of stuff that the framework does for you seems like magic, so it may lead to bad development habits because you're missing out in what's going on behind the nice looking Ruby code. Learning Rails also teaches you about the MVC (Model View Controller) architecture, which is generally a good way to structure applications, particularly web applications/websites. Rails has very simple database management through the use of ActiveRecord.

Other popular options for back-end languages include PHP and Python/Django.
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by The_Big_E)
I don't do Android or iOS apps, but I hear C# with Xamarin Studio is a common choice for Android developers. Objective-C is the iOS standard, but you can also use Swift, which seems easier to learn than the former.
Xamarin is only ever a go-to for experienced C# developers, and even they ***** to high heaven about it. There are way too many pitfalls for a beginner to even consider it.

Swift overtook Obj C as the iOS standard a long, long time ago (comparatively for the Apple ecosystem anyways) and you would end up hindering yourself by opting for Obj.

(Original post by The_Big_E)
Once you're experienced with HTML and CSS, you'll want to try learn some preprocessors like HAML and SASS to shorten your development time and make your code nice and clean. Though this isn't a must.
HAML is all but dead to everyone apart from the few still clinging onto rails, even most Node guys prefer to avoid it. SASS is nice when the dependencies work, but that's a big ask at times, whilst it may make certain aspects quicker, in a large development schedule it tends to slow progress significantly.

(Original post by The_Big_E)
I personally learnt Ruby as a general purpose programming language, but once I got into web development, I noticed that there are so many frameworks in Ruby, namely Rails, Sinatra and Jekyll. I suggest starting out with Rails if you're going down the Ruby path. The only problem with Rails is that a lot of stuff that the framework does for you seems like magic, so it may lead to bad development habits because you're missing out in what's going on behind the nice looking Ruby code. Learning Rails also teaches you about the MVC (Model View Controller) architecture, which is generally a good way to structure applications, particularly web applications/websites. Rails has very simple database management through the use of ActiveRecord.
Ruby is now one of the lowest used language derivatives in web development, excluding a few big names that are still using it (Twitter, AirBNB) but that also means the demand for it in industry is also scarce, so it can make employability a little sketchy, especially if you're not well versed.

Also Rails has a large set of...quirks which are prone to drive newbies utterly bananas. Unit testing that requires a database is the biggest fallacy in my eyes, as it completely defeats the point of being able to test individual segments of code if a database initialisation is required at all times. ActiveRecord's abstraction is also a little bit on the squiffy side.
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The_Big_E
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(Original post by iainvg)
Xamarin is only ever a go-to for experienced C# developers, and even they ***** to high heaven about it. There are way too many pitfalls for a beginner to even consider it.

Swift overtook Obj C as the iOS standard a long, long time ago (comparatively for the Apple ecosystem anyways) and you would end up hindering yourself by opting for Obj.



HAML is all but dead to everyone apart from the few still clinging onto rails, even most Node guys prefer to avoid it. SASS is nice when the dependencies work, but that's a big ask at times, whilst it may make certain aspects quicker, in a large development schedule it tends to slow progress significantly.



Ruby is now one of the lowest used language derivatives in web development, excluding a few big names that are still using it (Twitter, AirBNB) but that also means the demand for it in industry is also scarce, so it can make employability a little sketchy, especially if you're not well versed.

Also Rails has a large set of...quirks which are prone to drive newbies utterly bananas. Unit testing that requires a database is the biggest fallacy in my eyes, as it completely defeats the point of being able to test individual segments of code if a database initialisation is required at all times. ActiveRecord's abstraction is also a little bit on the squiffy side.
Yeah, I was aware of HAML only really being relevant mainly to Rails and frameworks like Jekyll/Sinatra, but it goes well with Ruby, which is why I suggested it, as that's how I started out.

I should have mentioned that I've only really done web development with Ruby frameworks, and haven't really done much else, so I'm obviously going to be skewed towards languages which go nicely with Ruby web development (minus CoffeeScript, that's just ugly).

Anyway, it's not like if you start out using one language/framework, you have to use it for the rest of eternity. It doesn't hurt to try out languages like Ruby and HAML to see if they work for you, or switch if they don't.

But anyway, all of this depends on what kind of websites OP wants to make. It would be great if he could specify. If it's something like a blog, I still stand by using Ruby frameworks with HAML or maybe Markdown to HTML because it really is a very easy, accessible way of starting out with web development.

Even if he's going after a programming job, there is still demand out there for Ruby (albeit almost always Rails only). Especially with startups. With Ruby, it's not likely you'll get a job in massive corporations like the big names you listed, and others like Github. But if that's what you're after, then sure, go for something else. But from his post, it doesn't even look like he's concerned about employment, he's just starting out with web dev now, and can always change.

Although at the same time I do agree with a lot of what you said, like the quirks of Rails. At some points I felt like starting out with Rails was a mistake, but I decided to just stick with it, only cause I had started with Ruby long before and really liked the language and wanted to like Rails. But yeah, as you said, I found testing to be the largest problem with Rails, and it's actually a massive problem for many Rails developers.

Another note to OP (If interested in Rails at all). When I was starting out, people often talked about Rails being slow relative to frameworks in other languages. But I think that surely if Twitter/Github use it, it's not really that big of a problem. From the few apps I've made, speed has not been a problem even remotely.

iainvg I'm curious now, what languages do you use?
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GiantKiwi
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(Original post by The_Big_E)
iainvg I'm curious now, what languages do you use?
Mostly PHP (CI, Symfony) now, but I've spent time in roles doing Node (Meteor), .NET (Umbraco :puke:) and Python (Django).

I prefer using LESS over SASS (syntax is better for differentiation IMO), and don't usually bother with either until i'm moving something to production, as there are fewer things to diagnose when something decides to not work as intended.
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The_Big_E
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(Original post by iainvg)
Mostly PHP (CI, Symfony) now, but I've spent time in roles doing Node (Meteor), .NET (Umbraco :puke:) and Python (Django).

I prefer using LESS over SASS (syntax is better for differentiation IMO), and don't usually bother with either until i'm moving something to production, as there are fewer things to diagnose when something decides to not work as intended.
Ahh cool. I used to do Python (at what I'd call a very basic level) during my last years of high school, but never got into Django and slowly lost interest in Python after I found Ruby . How do you find it, and how would you compare it with Rails in terms of functionality and employability?
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