Anonymous #1
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Apologies if this is the wrong section.

Should I use "impart" or "impart with" in this case:

A) Please could you impart ten minutes of your time?
B) Please could you impart with ten minutes of your time?

Thank you ever so much.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Apologies if this is the wrong section.

Should I use "impart" or "impart with" in this case:

A) Please could you impart ten minutes of your time?
B) Please could you impart with ten minutes of your time?

Thank you ever so much.
Why is this anonymous - it isn't sensitive personal information.

Neither of these options is correct - impart doesn't make sense here. What are you trying to say?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Why is this anonymous - it isn't sensitive personal information.

Neither of these options is correct - impart doesn't make sense here. What are you trying to say?
I think that perhaps I am confusing the word with "part".

Is there a better word to use in this sense?

Thanks
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josejuan
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Apologies if this is the wrong section.

Should I use "impart" or "impart with" in this case:

A) Please could you impart ten minutes of your time?
B) Please could you impart with ten minutes of your time?

Thank you ever so much.
I'd say correct it like this:

Please, could you spend ten minutes of your time?
Please, could you waste ten minutes of your time?
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I think that perhaps I am confusing the word with "part".

Is there a better word to use in this sense?

Thanks
No, 'part' isn't right either. I think you want the word 'spare' - "could you spare ten minutes of your time". That's idiomatically correct.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
No, 'part' isn't right either. I think you want the word 'spare' - "could you spare ten minutes of your time". That's idiomatically correct.

Okay, thank you.

Do you have any recommendations on how to improve my English grammar?
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Okay, thank you.

Do you have any recommendations on how to improve my English grammar?
For things like this, reading as much as you can in idiomatic English will help you. Are you a native speaker, or a foreign learner?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
For things like this, reading as much as you can in idiomatic English will help you. Are you a native speaker, or a foreign learner?
English is technically not my first language but I have been speaking it since I was a child, as one of my parents is a native English speaker. I moved to the UK when I was eight and was schooled here.
Written English / grammar has always been my weak point.

I have a few weeks to myself so I'm hoping to brush up on my English Language skills.

Right now, I'm writing a letter for something which is why I initially asked the question.

Thank you for your responses.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anonymous)
English is technically not my first language but I have been speaking it since I was a child, as one of my parents is a native English speaker. I moved to the UK when I was eight and was schooled here.
Written English / grammar has always been my weak point.

I have a few weeks to myself so I'm hoping to brush up on my English Language skills.

Right now, I'm writing a letter for something which is why I initially asked the question.

Thank you for your responses.
You're welcome - post back if you need any more help. More generally, the one thing I'd recommend you brush up on is your phrasal verbs. These are a nightmare for most foreign learners, as they really don't follow any rules or patterns, and just have to be learnt as pieces of vocabulary. But they really do stand out if you get them wrong!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Reality Check)
You're welcome - post back if you need any more help. More generally, the one thing I'd recommend you brush up on is your phrasal verbs. These are a nightmare for most foreign learners, as they really don't follow any rules or patterns, and just have to be learnt as pieces of vocabulary. But they really do stand out if you get them wrong!
Noted!
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