jonnyd100
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Hi

For my AH assignment, I was looking into the possibility of splitting brass into its core metals of copper and zinc and a method I found online was through electrolysis of brass in sodium bicarbonate which after reacting with ascorbic acid will leave me with copper(I) chloride as a precipitate and zinc chloride in solution. I just want to verify if this would be possible to do or if there was any other methods. I also want to know if it would be possible to do a titration against the zinc chloride solution (since from my understanding, it would be acidic) with a base to try and work out the concentration and then the mass of zinc.

Otherwise, has anyone got any info on how to extract copper from a 2p? I found a bit online about pennies then realised it was about american coins which are made differently.
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charco
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(Original post by jonnyd100)
Hi

For my AH assignment, I was looking into the possibility of splitting brass into its core metals of copper and zinc and a method I found online was through electrolysis of brass in sodium bicarbonate which after reacting with ascorbic acid will leave me with copper(I) chloride as a precipitate and zinc chloride in solution. I just want to verify if this would be possible to do or if there was any other methods. I also want to know if it would be possible to do a titration against the zinc chloride solution (since from my understanding, it would be acidic) with a base to try and work out the concentration and then the mass of zinc.

Otherwise, has anyone got any info on how to extract copper from a 2p? I found a bit online about pennies then realised it was about american coins which are made differently.
Sulfuric acid will only dissolve the zinc allowing you to do a determination by gravimetric methods. Weigh, dissolve, filter, wash and dry the unreacted. Then re-weigh.

Alternatively, nitric acid will dissolve both and you can do a colorimetric determination of the copper using prepared standards for a calibration curve.

Another possibility is to dissolve the coin in nitric acid and to add sodium carbonate to neutralise the excess acid (you can see this by the formation of copper carbonate precipitate). Addition of ethanoic acid will then redissolve the copper (and zinc) carbonate precipitates. Then you can perform a redox titration to determine the concentration of copper ions. Add excess potassium iodide and then titrate the iodine liberated using a standard sodium thiosulfate solution. Use starch indicator near the end point
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jonnyd100
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(Original post by charco)
Sulfuric acid will only dissolve the zinc allowing you to do a determination by gravimetric methods. Weigh, dissolve, filter, wash and dry the unreacted. Then re-weigh.

Alternatively, nitric acid will dissolve both and you can do a colorimetric determination of the copper using prepared standards for a calibration curve.

Another possibility is to dissolve the coin in nitric acid and to add sodium carbonate to neutralise the excess acid (you can see this by the formation of copper carbonate precipitate). Addition of ethanoic acid will then redissolve the copper (and zinc) carbonate precipitates. Then you can perform a redox titration to determine the concentration of copper ions. Add excess potassium iodide and then titrate the iodine liberated using a standard sodium thiosulfate solution. Use starch indicator near the end point
When you alloy a metal, they have new properties so you can't just dissolve one metal out of the allot.This would work for post 1992 1+2p since they are copper coated steel but pre-1992 1+2p are just brass alloy so i'm having the same problem, since it's kinda hard to separate alloys...
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charco
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(Original post by jonnyd100)
When you alloy a metal, they have new properties so you can't just dissolve one metal out of the allot.This would work for post 1992 1+2p since they are copper coated steel but pre-1992 1+2p are just brass alloy so i'm having the same problem, since it's kinda hard to separate alloys...
When you alloy a metal the physical properties change, but the alloy still displays the individual chemical properties of its components.

Clearly if there is a coating (barrier) then that could cause a problem, however it could be overcome by grinding the alloy to powder.
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