SmileyChap
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
I'm going to be doing Biology, Chemistry and Maths this September.
But I was wondering what the ideal way for making notes for these 3 subjects would be (especially maths).

Any tips are fully welcomed
0
reply
katiee987
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
For maths, my revision consisted of 3 steps:
1. Write out the basic process/techniques within each module with one example for each - e.g. I would do a set of notes for C1, with subtitles like 'algebra' and 'differentiation'. For each module (e.g. C1) this usually takes up 2 - 4 double sided pages. I'd just basically summarise my class notes. I could then refer to these whenever I got stuck on questions.
2. Make cards with formulas/things that don't come kind of instinctively and that you just need to learn off by heart. Each module usually needs just 1 or 2 revision cards. Practice these lots, rereading and repeating them to yourself or writing them out lots.
3. Practice questions and past papers! Do practice questions on tricky topics but otherwise just keep going with past papers, making sure to check answers and write and understand solutions.
I would begin these steps maybe about 6-8 weeks before the exam, ideally. For AS this was fine but A2 I started a bit later so was a bit more rushed, especially as I had chem and bio. Over the year, I didn't really worry, just kept up with classwork, writing notes in class and doing the class exercises and homeworks.

For chemistry and biology? Well..I don't really know, I'm not very good at those subjects and probably shouldn't have picked them for A level! I typed up notes using the textbook and class notes, but for biology that was like 90 A4 pages, and chemistry about 50 A4 pages. Then I hand wrote flashcards for each, condensing things but not removing any information. Biology I ended up with, for the whole A level, about 120 flashcards. Chemistry was only about 60 flashcards. Hand writing them definitely helped me remember them.
Then I did past questions. And kept on testing myself on the flashcards and then trying to scribble out the information or say it aloud without looking at the flashcards.

Hope this helped x
6
reply
S.G.
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by katiee987)
For maths, my revision consisted of 3 steps:
1. Write out the basic process/techniques within each module with one example for each - e.g. I would do a set of notes for C1, with subtitles like 'algebra' and 'differentiation'. For each module (e.g. C1) this usually takes up 2 - 4 double sided pages. I'd just basically summarise my class notes. I could then refer to these whenever I got stuck on questions.
2. Make cards with formulas/things that don't come kind of instinctively and that you just need to learn off by heart. Each module usually needs just 1 or 2 revision cards. Practice these lots, rereading and repeating them to yourself or writing them out lots.
3. Practice questions and past papers! Do practice questions on tricky topics but otherwise just keep going with past papers, making sure to check answers and write and understand solutions.
I would begin these steps maybe about 6-8 weeks before the exam, ideally. For AS this was fine but A2 I started a bit later so was a bit more rushed, especially as I had chem and bio. Over the year, I didn't really worry, just kept up with classwork, writing notes in class and doing the class exercises and homeworks.

For chemistry and biology? Well..I don't really know, I'm not very good at those subjects and probably shouldn't have picked them for A level! I typed up notes using the textbook and class notes, but for biology that was like 90 A4 pages, and chemistry about 50 A4 pages. Then I hand wrote flashcards for each, condensing things but not removing any information. Biology I ended up with, for the whole A level, about 120 flashcards. Chemistry was only about 60 flashcards. Hand writing them definitely helped me remember them.
Then I did past questions. And kept on testing myself on the flashcards and then trying to scribble out the information or say it aloud without looking at the flashcards.

Hope this helped x
Wow. My biology typed up notes were 180 pages long
0
reply
S.G.
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by SmileyChap)
I'm going to be doing Biology, Chemistry and Maths this September.
But I was wondering what the ideal way for making notes for these 3 subjects would be (especially maths).

Any tips are fully welcomed
For biology and chemistry, I used 3 things to make notes: the specifications, the endorsed textbook, and the CGP revision guide.

I went through each point in the specification and create notes with the same title as it was in the spec. I used the textbook to understand the material and made condensed notes out of it and used the CGP guide to add in the extra details. My notes were only ever bullet points. Hence each topic basically had bullet points like a mark scheme would
2
reply
katiee987
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by SGHD26716)
Wow. My biology typed up notes were 180 pages long
My typed up notes were still condensed, and didn't include any diagrams. And size 9 font I think!
1
reply
S.G.
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by katiee987)
My typed up notes were still condensed, and didn't include any diagrams. And size 9 font I think!
I had a lot of diagrams for biology and size 12 font so I could read it
0
reply
katiee987
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by SGHD26716)
I had a lot of diagrams for biology and size 12 font so I could read it
That probably explains a lot of the difference then my typed notes were just for me to easily hand write into flashcards, so I didn't care too much about font etc.
0
reply
CoffeeAndPolitics
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by SmileyChap)
I'm going to be doing Biology, Chemistry and Maths this September.
But I was wondering what the ideal way for making notes for these 3 subjects would be (especially maths).

Any tips are fully welcomed
Have made this sticky as I think this thread would be quite useful for others. xD
1
reply
SmileyChap
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#9
(Original post by katiee987)
For maths, my revision consisted of 3 steps:
1. Write out the basic process/techniques within each module with one example for each - e.g. I would do a set of notes for C1, with subtitles like 'algebra' and 'differentiation'. For each module (e.g. C1) this usually takes up 2 - 4 double sided pages. I'd just basically summarise my class notes. I could then refer to these whenever I got stuck on questions.
2. Make cards with formulas/things that don't come kind of instinctively and that you just need to learn off by heart. Each module usually needs just 1 or 2 revision cards. Practice these lots, rereading and repeating them to yourself or writing them out lots.
3. Practice questions and past papers! Do practice questions on tricky topics but otherwise just keep going with past papers, making sure to check answers and write and understand solutions.
I would begin these steps maybe about 6-8 weeks before the exam, ideally. For AS this was fine but A2 I started a bit later so was a bit more rushed, especially as I had chem and bio. Over the year, I didn't really worry, just kept up with classwork, writing notes in class and doing the class exercises and homeworks.

For chemistry and biology? Well..I don't really know, I'm not very good at those subjects and probably shouldn't have picked them for A level! I typed up notes using the textbook and class notes, but for biology that was like 90 A4 pages, and chemistry about 50 A4 pages. Then I hand wrote flashcards for each, condensing things but not removing any information. Biology I ended up with, for the whole A level, about 120 flashcards. Chemistry was only about 60 flashcards. Hand writing them definitely helped me remember them.
Then I did past questions. And kept on testing myself on the flashcards and then trying to scribble out the information or say it aloud without looking at the flashcards.

Hope this helped x
Thank you so much. This was incredibly useful
0
reply
katiee987
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 years ago
#10
(Original post by SmileyChap)
Thank you so much. This was incredibly useful
No worries, glad I could help
0
reply
lmaooome
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 years ago
#11
(Original post by SmileyChap)
I'm going to be doing Biology, Chemistry and Maths this September.
But I was wondering what the ideal way for making notes for these 3 subjects would be (especially maths).

Any tips are fully welcomed
doing biology, chemistry and psychology and I'm literally scared for biology tbh
0
reply
aleksceramics
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 3 years ago
#12
I wrote up all my notes on my laptop, making them colourful! I also did this on paper too
They looked like this:
Name:  Screenshot at Aug 09 12-49-39.jpg
Views: 736
Size:  221.0 KB
Attached files
1
reply
SmileyChap
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#13
(Original post by aleksceramics)
I wrote up all my notes on my laptop, making them colourful! I also did this on paper too
They looked like this:
Name:  Screenshot at Aug 09 12-49-39.jpg
Views: 736
Size:  221.0 KB
What software do you use?? Or is it just Microsoft word?
0
reply
aleksceramics
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report 3 years ago
#14
(Original post by SmileyChap)
What software do you use?? Or is it just Microsoft word?
I have a Mac so I used Pages, but I also converted them into word documents to share with friends and the format was the same, so you could easily do this on Word too
0
reply
najmat
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#15
Report 3 years ago
#15
(Original post by aleksceramics)
I have a Mac so I used Pages, but I also converted them into word documents to share with friends and the format was the same, so you could easily do this on Word too
Can you attach your notes for biology in this thread , please ?
Thanks
0
reply
aleksceramics
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 years ago
#16
(Original post by najmat)
Can you attach your notes for biology in this thread , please ?
Thanks

hey i'm happy to share notes, but this is for the biological psychology component of my psychology A level, not biology A level. i can give you my psychology notes if that is what you're after!
0
reply
username3312304
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#17
Report 3 years ago
#17
(Original post by lmaooome)
doing biology, chemistry and psychology and I'm literally scared for biology tbh
Lol I'm doing physics, chemistry and Maths
From listening to ppl I'm scared for Chemistry but I read all their tips so I'm prepared for the storm lol.😋
0
reply
najmat
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#18
Report 3 years ago
#18
(Original post by aleksceramics)
hey i'm happy to share notes, but this is for the biological psychology component of my psychology A level, not biology A level. i can give you my psychology notes if that is what you're after!
Yes please
0
reply
imnotcatherine
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#19
Report 3 years ago
#19
I do Biology, Chemistry and Maths. For Biology and Chemistry, I use the Cornell Method (I've made a blog post about it here - http://imnotcatherine.blogspot.com/2...ll-method.html)

For Maths, I just do the work in my book but keep all my question sheets in a big folder. I put a tick/cross next to each question depending on if I got it right, so that when I go back and revise I can see what I couldn't do. Any notes I make, I usually use a different coloured pen and bubble around it with highlighters so it's easy to find. Also, I keep formulas on my phone so I always have them, and for Decision (don't know if you're doing that module) I made a little booklet of algorithms out of cue cards.

I felt like there weren't that many notes I needed to make in Maths because as long as I practised enough I remembered things, but maybe it could be worth having a book for answering questions and a book for taking notes/writing how to do things?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (284)
56.8%
I don't have everything I need (216)
43.2%

Watched Threads

View All