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Does religion help or hinder scientific research? watch

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    Religion has helped science in the past, and continues to do so. The Vatican was responsible for the Gregorian calendar, spectroscopy, stellar classes, the Big Bang theory, to name just a few.

    But it has also hindered science. There is a huge controversy over abortion and evolution. There is controversy over the Big Bang theory, and there was once controversy over the place of Earth in our solar system.

    Overall I think it hinders science, but it has helped in the past, and it continues to help a little today.


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    It's has always hinders science. In a day when everyone was religious, of course some science would come because it is logical conclusions. But treating a specific book/doctrine as absolute truth is the complete opposite of science(by definition) which causes the clashing.


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    Religion has neither helped or hindered scientific research.
    It is irrelevant in scientific research.
    Although if religious leaders use their belief to affect science research as in the case of embryonic stem cells ,you could say hinders.
    But that does not happen as often as people like to think.
    The biggest problem we have right now in science research is funding and publish or perish culture.
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    (Original post by bobby147)
    Religion has neither helped or hindered scientific research.
    It is irrelevant in scientific research.
    Although if religious leaders use their belief to affect science research as in the case of embryonic stem cells ,you could say hinders.
    But that does not happen as often as people like to think.
    The biggest problem we have right now in science research is funding and publish or perish culture.
    @Lmacwilliam

    you can argue that religion is the sole reason for scientific research.
    beliefs are what enable humans to cooperate on a large scale. This can either be capitalism like today or Religion. A shared belief allows use to trust each other and without cooperation it is unlikely that schools would be a thing or that groups of people would join together to think out of the box.
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    (Original post by Dafock)
    you can argue that religion is the sole reason for scientific research.
    beliefs are what enable humans to cooperate on a large scale. This can either be capitalism like today or Religion. A shared belief allows use to trust each other and without cooperation it is unlikely that schools would be a thing or that groups of people would join together to think out of the box.
    The only belief scientists share universally is the scientific method.
    Many scientists are not religious so I have no idea where you are getting your ideas from.
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    People I quoted,did you ever had God in your thoughts while in the lab or doing research or study?
    The answer is no probably.
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    To an extent, religion in so what has helped scientific research to progress in many factors but that was pre 1800's.
    However, due to the great scientific research found and developed religion has hindered the development of it due to lack of acceptance.
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    (Original post by bobby147)
    The only belief scientists share universally is the scientific method.
    Many scientists are not religious so I have no idea where you are getting your ideas from.
    Plantagenet Crown
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    People I quoted,did you ever had God in your thoughts while in the lab or doing research or study?
    The answer is no probably.
    The complexity of Life stills ****s with my head, and the elegance of it astounds and stupefies me, but at no point have I felt the need to attempt to explain it by reference to a God or Gods.
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    (Original post by bobby147)
    The only belief scientists share universally is the scientific method.
    Many scientists are not religious so I have no idea where you are getting your ideas from.
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    but Religion was the first stepping stone to lead to scientific reasoning. Many scientists today arent religious but the scientists of the past thousands of years were.
    It's pretty common knowledge that the cognitive revolution alowed humans to adapt and question the world around them. Beliefs like Christianity and tribes thinking that if they praise this rock I will have a good hunt. Meant that they could work together.Without this scientific research would be nill.

    EDIT: Just to make it clear I dont think that Religion today is important for science. But to discredit its influence in the past is just down right stupid.
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    (Original post by DanielCross)
    Religion has helped science in the past, and continues to do so. The Vatican was responsible for the Gregorian calendar, spectroscopy, stellar classes, the Big Bang theory, to name just a few.

    But it has also hindered science. There is a huge controversy over abortion and evolution. There is controversy over the Big Bang theory, and there was once controversy over the place of Earth in our solar system.

    Overall I think it hinders science, but it has helped in the past, and it continues to help a little today.


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    TRIGGER WARNING: for open, educated and mutually respectful minds. anyone else take a hike!

    Depend which religion you're talking about.

    Abortion has little to do with 'Science' and more to do with morality. And no, women do not have a sovereign right to decide what happens to *another* life inside or outside them. Those of us who are anti abortion based on solely on choice are not so because of superstition etc but we are interested in the fundamental rights of an organism which is a developing human. Think the Bible or Christopher Hitchens (a preacher of Atheism or "anti-theism" as he puts it)

    The Vatican has done much for education and even much against it. Burning at the stake a number of enlightened men and women who challenged organisational orthodoxy. But the Hebrew Bible or the Bible as a whole is not a product of the Vatican but a product used by it- sometimes inappropriately, whose fault is that? I'll let you conclude,

    Yes religion may or may not hinder; but take for example - I will refer to the Hebrew Bible: the teaching of Man and Woman, as fundamental units of the natural human world, it underpins what we know of Biology and Human civilisation.

    Atheists, many intelligent and articulate ones agree.

    Then comes bogus 'science' based on "research", teaches transgender, gender fluid and about 50+ gender status'. Those with faith in the Hebrew Bible understand the Human race to be binary with anomolys - genetic etc and that Mental health is a imprecise but tough area, requiring compassion and structure, not allowing people to declare their gender according to subjective thinking.
    on the other hand many atheists will agree gender binary is a fact. but they are not obliged by science and can change their 'science' according to the socio-political landscape. Cultural marxism and relavatism govern 'science'.
    I ask you has not the Hebrew bible remained faithful to Biology and are not its adherents committed to such fundamentals. Non religions or indeed pagan religions would welcome mental fluidity and gender flexibility, because they call upon subjective veneration and then draw conclusions.

    BTW I Concede there are critismcs of the Hebrew Bible. I am not (nor desire to become) a Rabbi.

    Overall I don't think we can say yes or know, both sides have legitimate points of view. Neither do we have a window into the minds of 'Scientists' to know what motivates them; science> religion or religion> science or another process. we can only draw conclusions on what we know - now that's hard!

    Please excuse typos etc, this was a quick reply.
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    Darwin himself was a Christian so no
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    (Original post by FarhanHalim)
    Darwin himself was a Christian so no
    Darwin was not a Christian,he lost his Christian belief .
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    Religion helps or hinders scientific research in much the same way as political parties do.
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    (Original post by DanielCross)
    The Vatican was responsible for spectroscopy, stellar classes to name just a few.
    WTF? You'll have to explain!

    If you are claiming that the Vatican was responsible for the Big Bang theory because Lemaitre was a Catholic priest, I would suggest that his PhD in physics, plus his work at Cambridge University, Harvard Observatory and MIT probably had more to do with it!
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    (Original post by bobby147)
    The only belief scientists share universally is the scientific method.
    Many scientists are not religious so I have no idea where you are getting your ideas from.
    Plantagenet Crown
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    People I quoted,did you ever had God in your thoughts while in the lab or doing research or study?
    The answer is no probably.
    No I haven't. Not in the way you mean anyway!
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    (Original post by QE2)
    WTF? You'll have to explain!

    If you are claiming that the Vatican was responsible for the Big Bang theory because Lemaitre was a Catholic priest, I would suggest that his PhD in physics, plus his work at Cambridge University, Harvard Observatory and MIT probably had more to do with it!
    Okay, I wasn't being strictly truthful there, but I was making a point.


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    (Original post by Dafock)
    @Lmacwilliam

    you can argue that religion is the sole reason for scientific research.
    beliefs are what enable humans to cooperate on a large scale. This can either be capitalism like today or Religion. A shared belief allows use to trust each other and without cooperation it is unlikely that schools would be a thing or that groups of people would join together to think out of the box.
    No you cannot. You are essentially saying without religion we wouldn't have cooperation or schools?! Yes we would. In a world without religion we would still have cooperation, schools and be a lot more advanced in science. Just because the path we took included religion doesn't mean it's the only path and the most beneficial.

    Apes cooperate with each other (by surviving, hunting and protecting each other in groups) and teach their young how to survive (through example) and what to eat. They don't follow a religion. So you cannot say without religion we wouldn't cooperate or teach.

    As I said by definition science and religion don't agree and clash.

    Another point I must bring up and I don't want to trigger people is: religion causes most wars, especially in our past. I'm just going to mention the names IRA and ISIS. I don't remember the last time someone blew themselves up saying "I believe in science!". All that time and money spent on war could go towards scientific research. Now chemical weapons are banned, helpful scientific discoveries are no longer a side product of war (I say that for ammonium nitrate)


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    (Original post by bobby147)
    The only belief scientists share universally is the scientific method.
    Many scientists are not religious so I have no idea where you are getting your ideas from.
    Plantagenet Crown
    Reality Check
    QE2
    People I quoted,did you ever had God in your thoughts while in the lab or doing research or study?
    The answer is no probably.
    I'm still a research scientist and no, God never enters my thoughts while in the lab.
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    (Original post by DanielCross)
    Religion has helped science in the past, and continues to do so.
    How? By making philosophers flee from Roman Empire? Burning books through the ancient, medieval, up to modern times?
    Teaching not much else but theology? Locking up Galileo to the end of his life? Banning Copernicus' work?

    (Original post by DanielCross)
    The Vatican was responsible for (...), the Big Bang theory, to name just a few.




    (Original post by DanielCross)
    There is a huge controversy over abortion and evolution.
    Speaking of evolution, the concept that advanced organisms are a product of evolution from simple ones, already with some empirical research supporting the theory, is 600 years older than Christianity, but who would have thought that there might have been something like this, if the Bible claimed that all species were created by God, as they are, and people were obliged to believe it?

    Religion is a damn good excuse not to think. It kills curiosity



    (Original post by DanielCross)

    There is controversy over the Big Bang theory, and there was once controversy over the place of Earth in our solar system.
    In catholic church there isn't. Vatican like the Big Bang theory because it doesn't tell
    Pope John Paul II even said that scientists should not try to find out what was before the Big Bang, because that is God's territory :laugh:

    (Original post by DanielCross)
    Overall I think it hinders science, but it has helped in the past, and it continues to help a little today.
    Phh... Churches are absolutely hopeless in supporting scientific research, and religion doesn't have much to say in today's research, even treated as some kind of bizarre inspiration, not to mention that philosophy can do this with more variety.
    Reading Scientific American, I often find general sketches of some theories and discoveries being similar to ancient Greek concepts from philosophy, but nothing there brings religion to my mind.

    Not to mention we're wasting a lot of time to discuss religious issues, while we would be learning something proper.
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    (Original post by DanielCross)
    Religion has helped science in the past, and continues to do so. The Vatican was responsible for the Gregorian calendar, spectroscopy, stellar classes, the Big Bang theory, to name just a few.

    But it has also hindered science. There is a huge controversy over abortion and evolution. There is controversy over the Big Bang theory, and there was once controversy over the place of Earth in our solar system.

    Overall I think it hinders science, but it has helped in the past, and it continues to help a little today.


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    Personally, I don't think my religion, Sikhism, helps or hinders scientific research. It's more to due with living your life as a decent human being and trying to achieve salvation rather than trying to teach us it's own 'religious science'.

    As a Sikh, I leave science to the scientists. I don't know about other religions
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    Neither.
 
 
 

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