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    Hi world! I pretty much flunked my GCSE Sciences (F) back in school, and did OK but not great in a few other subjects: Mathematics - C, Statistics - C, English Language - C, English Literature B I applied to retake my GCSE Maths and Science in college, and I did worse in Maths (D) although better in Science; Chem - C, Bio - C, Physics - D. Of course, it still sucks. *I was 18 at this point.I never gave up and decided to self study GCSE Maths, Chem and Bio. I worked at the same time, so it took me a lot longer than I would have liked. I paid to take the exams privately and got straight A's. *I was 23 at this point.I am currently self studying my A-Levels and will probably sit my exams next summer. *I am now 25. Let's say I smash these exams along with my UKCAT, but looking at my awful GCSE background what are my chances of getting into medical school? I have worked so hard to get to where I am now, trying to make up for my previous mistakes, but I feel that no universities are going to look past these mistakes. Any advice? Thank you in advance.
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    (Original post by onion95)
    Hi world! I pretty much flunked my GCSE Sciences (F) back in school, and did OK but not great in a few other subjects: Mathematics - C, Statistics - C, English Language - C, English Literature B I applied to retake my GCSE Maths and Science in college, and I did worse in Maths (D) although better in Science; Chem - C, Bio - C, Physics - D. Of course, it still sucks. *I was 18 at this point.I never gave up and decided to self study GCSE Maths, Chem and Bio. I worked at the same time, so it took me a lot longer than I would have liked. I paid to take the exams privately and got straight A's. *I was 23 at this point.I am currently self studying my A-Levels and will probably sit my exams next summer. *I am now 25. Let's say I smash these exams along with my UKCAT, but looking at my awful GCSE background what are my chances of getting into medical school? I have worked so hard to get to where I am now, trying to make up for my previous mistakes, but I feel that no universities are going to look past these mistakes. Any advice? Thank you in advance.
    Your GCSEs won't count as you've retaken them. They'll only look at your first result.

    Furthermore, you need at least a B in GCSE English Language.

    If you really want to do medicine I would suggest doing it in Eastern Europe via an agency.
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    (Original post by onion95)
    Hi world! I pretty much flunked my GCSE Sciences (F) back in school, and did OK but not great in a few other subjects: Mathematics - C, Statistics - C, English Language - C, English Literature B I applied to retake my GCSE Maths and Science in college, and I did worse in Maths (D) although better in Science; Chem - C, Bio - C, Physics - D. Of course, it still sucks. *I was 18 at this point.I never gave up and decided to self study GCSE Maths, Chem and Bio. I worked at the same time, so it took me a lot longer than I would have liked. I paid to take the exams privately and got straight A's. *I was 23 at this point.I am currently self studying my A-Levels and will probably sit my exams next summer. *I am now 25. Let's say I smash these exams along with my UKCAT, but looking at my awful GCSE background what are my chances of getting into medical school? I have worked so hard to get to where I am now, trying to make up for my previous mistakes, but I feel that no universities are going to look past these mistakes. Any advice? Thank you in advance.
    If you have poor GCSEs, universities will look at your A-Levels to see if you improved. They like to see improvement.


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    (Original post by onion95)
    Hi world! I pretty much flunked my GCSE Sciences (F) back in school, and did OK but not great in a few other subjects: Mathematics - C, Statistics - C, English Language - C, English Literature B I applied to retake my GCSE Maths and Science in college, and I did worse in Maths (D) although better in Science; Chem - C, Bio - C, Physics - D. Of course, it still sucks. *I was 18 at this point.I never gave up and decided to self study GCSE Maths, Chem and Bio. I worked at the same time, so it took me a lot longer than I would have liked. I paid to take the exams privately and got straight A's. *I was 23 at this point.I am currently self studying my A-Levels and will probably sit my exams next summer. *I am now 25. Let's say I smash these exams along with my UKCAT, but looking at my awful GCSE background what are my chances of getting into medical school? I have worked so hard to get to where I am now, trying to make up for my previous mistakes, but I feel that no universities are going to look past these mistakes. Any advice? Thank you in advance.
    Have you considered going down the graduate pathway?
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    (Original post by WhoDaresWins)
    Have you considered going down the graduate pathway?
    I've looked into the Extended Medical Degree Programme at King's College University, but it doesn't state any requirements regarding GCSEs, just A-Levels?
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    (Original post by onion95)
    I've looked into the Extended Medical Degree Programme at King's College University, but it doesn't state any requirements regarding GCSEs, just A-Levels?
    'Our six-year (excluding the opt-out Intercalated BSc) Extended Medical Degree Programme MBBS (EMDP) is specifically designed for students who are studying A-levels or Access to Medicine at a non-selective state school in Greater London, or who are participants of Realising Opportunities across England'

    Also remember that you aren't the only one, they are looking for the cream of the crop.
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    (Original post by WhoDaresWins)
    'Our six-year (excluding the opt-out Intercalated BSc) Extended Medical Degree Programme MBBS (EMDP) is specifically designed for students who are studying A-levels or Access to Medicine at a non-selective state school in Greater London, or who are participants of Realising Opportunities across England'

    Also remember that you aren't the only one, they are looking for the cream of the crop.
    Ah, it's really not looking great for me.
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    (Original post by onion95)
    Ah, it's really not looking great for me.
    Where there's a will there's a way.
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    Your best option is probably to consider the GEM route but I have been hearing some talk recently about GEM being potentially phased out. I don't know how much truth there is to this but it's something to think about.
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    Definitely Graduate entry - although it is still highly competitive. Do the best you can with a levels, and get some work experience during the summer. Then, apply for an undergraduate course - preferably suited along the same lines as medicine (although taking one which isn't directly related can still be used if you go for a non-science background entry route like me). You're showing real dedication by resitting these qualifications, so make sure you use that side to your advantage. Often graduate routes will favour life experience too. Universities such as Liverpool and Uni of Highlands and Islands (which link to St. Andrews) also take on people who are over 19 and wanting to get into medicine. There are others courses too, like clinical science where you have a 1/10 chance in being transferred to Leeds medical school. Don't give up! I was talking to the head of Medical Sciences at UCLAN who said that he left high school with no qualifications - and now he is head of a medical department at a university. Keep going! There is always another route, and if it isn't medicine, you could always look into becoming a physician associate.
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    (Original post by Mr Optimist)
    Your best option is probably to consider the GEM route but I have been hearing some talk recently about GEM being potentially phased out. I don't know how much truth there is to this but it's something to think about.
    It's not being phased out, they're just making it a tad longer so that it conforms to the GMC's guidelines on the length of time spent studying by any doctor being a certain length (I can't remember the exact length but it needs to be longer basically).
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    (Original post by Bow Tie)
    It's not being phased out, they're just making it a tad longer so that it conforms to the GMC's guidelines on the length of time spent studying by any doctor being a certain length (I can't remember the exact length but it needs to be longer basically).
    From my understanding, they needed the GEM to be 5 years in duration so it complies with an EU law. Given Brexit happened, I wonder if the change will happen. I do hope you're right and they don't phase it out. It'll be devastating for some of us if it were to happen.
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    Maybe aim for the less prestigious med schools, like glasgow/hull-york instead of newc/manc/londone etc? Or see which don't take gcse's into account.
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    (Original post by onion95)
    Hi world! I pretty much flunked my GCSE Sciences (F) back in school, and did OK but not great in a few other subjects: Mathematics - C, Statistics - C, English Language - C, English Literature B I applied to retake my GCSE Maths and Science in college, and I did worse in Maths (D) although better in Science; Chem - C, Bio - C, Physics - D. Of course, it still sucks. *I was 18 at this point.I never gave up and decided to self study GCSE Maths, Chem and Bio. I worked at the same time, so it took me a lot longer than I would have liked. I paid to take the exams privately and got straight A's. *I was 23 at this point.I am currently self studying my A-Levels and will probably sit my exams next summer. *I am now 25. Let's say I smash these exams along with my UKCAT, but looking at my awful GCSE background what are my chances of getting into medical school? I have worked so hard to get to where I am now, trying to make up for my previous mistakes, but I feel that no universities are going to look past these mistakes. Any advice? Thank you in advance.
    DEFO. if you work hard at a level and absolutely smash them there's no reason why they wouldn't consider you. It seems to me that you've learnt from your mistakes and continue to better yourself which is a sign many unis like to see. For whatever reason, you haven't done well at GCSE; you can explain this as an extenuating circumstance. Its usually like a separate form, I dont know much about that but I'm sure you can look into it.
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    Hey,
    From my understanding it does depend on the wider person.
    If you don't mind me asking do you have any extenuating circumstances why your first take of GCSE's went wrong? If you did and also went to a poorly performing school you may be able to get around it.

    The best thing to do is ask the individual universities. For example depending on backgrounds there are different entrance routes.

    I hope that helps. I've currently got a blog talking all about Medical School entrance so you and anyone else may find it useful. (The Travelling Medical Student (on blogspot))

    Best of luck. I applaud your determination x
 
 
 
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