Lumi172
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Ok, where to begin...

Longer Version
I'm a year into the Art GCSE. Things could be going better, however they could be going worse. We've done three main projects, all of which I was graded a 7. I was pleased with the result at first but as the year progressed, I was less impressed to the point where I now feel I have made no improvement from the start of the year to this point.
My art teacher is lazy and has given us no guidance as to how to approach this GCSE, only very much 'do this' 'do that' without giving us any creative freedom she assured we'd have.
I'm targeted a 9 however looking at my folder then looking at the works of other students taught by a different teacher and looking at videos of what is considered to be an A* or an A folder, I have less faith in my own.
I don't really need my faith to be restored in my art. That I will probably be able to do on my own. The problem I'm having is how do I lay things out, what do I include in the annotations, what do I include as a piece of work, how much research is too much research, should I analyse every piece documented. Pretty much, how do I approach this GCSE?
Also, do I have to make all the things I do in my work personal to me? That's the only thing that our teacher ever tells us to do. Does this help us gain or marks?

Shorter version
How do I approach the Art GCSE? How do I lay things out, what do I include in the annotations, what do I include as a piece of work, how much research is too much research, should I analyse every piece documented? What do I do?

Also, is there any artists you would consider to be good to look at for my developments?

Don't know if this is irrelevant or not but I believe I am studying AQA,the three topics we have covered are My favourite things/still life, Body adornments and Words and Meaning

Thanks, much appreciated.
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faloodeh
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First of all if you know what you're doing dont listen to your teacher at all and just do whatever you want.
Basically in your books you have to show how everything links to your final piece/the theme.
Annotations for what??? for your own drawings you talk about the media/materials/texture used, colours used, the layout, essentially why you did it.
Artists studies: small background on the artist, then you talk about the mediums they use, the colour scheme, what you think of their work, how you could apply it to your own, the artists intentions etc.
it is not art history so you dont need to do too much research.

Layout is hit or miss. essentially make sure your page doesnt LOOK empty. Perhaps keep looking at other books for inspiration on page layout. You can play with textures for layout or do drawings in boxes etc.
Perhaps a good idea to check out your specification, but make sure your book has drawings in a variety of media (paint, pen, pencil, charcoal, etc) and different drawing styles (continuous line, expressionist, tonal etc..)

Be creative in how you set out your page. maybe tea/coffee stain it, practice mark making techniques on it, use paper to create mini pages inside that can flip up, you can write on different materials for annotations like tracing paper or acetate (Which I did, and tied it to the page using string)
People say dont pay attention to the typography of your title but its important, aswell the the handwriting style, if you want to present a certain theme. (Just being extra though, you wont get extra marks for using stencils.) but Id recommend keeping the style consistent throughout.

Essentially your book has to make sense and you have to show elements of what artists you use and applying them to your own drawings.
A basic layout we used was: brainstorm on the title, artist study, artist study copy, development pages of your own drawings etc, then again if you used another artist, final piece draft and evaluation.

essentially you can do whatever you want as long as you can justify it.
just PLEASE make sure you finish everything on time. I did art this year so the grading is not numbered, but hope it helps.
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whoknowsreally
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i came out of my art GCSE having spent not a lot of time on it, but i did decently. the advice i would give is quantity not quality. in my experience, it wasn't necessarily the people who did really beautiful work that came out on top, but the people who did a lot - for example in the first coursework module there was a boy who did a few beautiful tonal drawings, absolutely incredible, but didn't pass. there was a girl with mediocre talent that experimented with material a lot who got a B. this is not to say don't try - make your work as nice as possible - but the biggest thing exam boards will look for is testing, experimenting with varied materials (ie make sure you have tonals, paint work, acrylic, oil, pastels, watercolour, ink etc.) and high amounts of work. also, make sure you put maximum effort into your design ideas as they show the thought behind your work.

at the end of the day art should be something you enjoy and not something stressful. as long as you pass you've done well.
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Lumi172
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(Original post by Faloodeh)
First of all if you know what you're doing dont listen to your teacher at all and just do whatever you want.
Basically in your books you have to show how everything links to your final piece/the theme.
Annotations for what??? for your own drawings you talk about the media/materials/texture used, colours used, the layout, essentially why you did it.
Artists studies: small background on the artist, then you talk about the mediums they use, the colour scheme, what you think of their work, how you could apply it to your own, the artists intentions etc.
it is not art history so you dont need to do too much research.

Layout is hit or miss. essentially make sure your page doesnt LOOK empty. Perhaps keep looking at other books for inspiration on page layout. You can play with textures for layout or do drawings in boxes etc.
Perhaps a good idea to check out your specification, but make sure your book has drawings in a variety of media (paint, pen, pencil, charcoal, etc) and different drawing styles (continuous line, expressionist, tonal etc..)

Be creative in how you set out your page. maybe tea/coffee stain it, practice mark making techniques on it, use paper to create mini pages inside that can flip up, you can write on different materials for annotations like tracing paper or acetate (Which I did, and tied it to the page using string)
People say dont pay attention to the typography of your title but its important, aswell the the handwriting style, if you want to present a certain theme. (Just being extra though, you wont get extra marks for using stencils.) but Id recommend keeping the style consistent throughout.

Essentially your book has to make sense and you have to show elements of what artists you use and applying them to your own drawings.
A basic layout we used was: brainstorm on the title, artist study, artist study copy, development pages of your own drawings etc, then again if you used another artist, final piece draft and evaluation.

essentially you can do whatever you want as long as you can justify it.
just PLEASE make sure you finish everything on time. I did art this year so the grading is not numbered, but hope it helps.


Thank you very much for the detailed answer! Found it extremely helpful and I believe I have a better grasp of what to do. Thanks again for the help!
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Lumi172
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
i came out of my art GCSE having spent not a lot of time on it, but i did decently. the advice i would give is quantity not quality. in my experience, it wasn't necessarily the people who did really beautiful work that came out on top, but the people who did a lot - for example in the first coursework module there was a boy who did a few beautiful tonal drawings, absolutely incredible, but didn't pass. there was a girl with mediocre talent that experimented with material a lot who got a B. this is not to say don't try - make your work as nice as possible - but the biggest thing exam boards will look for is testing, experimenting with varied materials (ie make sure you have tonals, paint work, acrylic, oil, pastels, watercolour, ink etc.) and high amounts of work. also, make sure you put maximum effort into your design ideas as they show the thought behind your work.

at the end of the day art should be something you enjoy and not something stressful. as long as you pass you've done well.
Interesting to hear this. Thanks for the response. I will keep this in mind.
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faloodeh
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
i came out of my art GCSE having spent not a lot of time on it, but i did decently. the advice i would give is quantity not quality. in my experience, it wasn't necessarily the people who did really beautiful work that came out on top, but the people who did a lot - for example in the first coursework module there was a boy who did a few beautiful tonal drawings, absolutely incredible, but didn't pass. there was a girl with mediocre talent that experimented with material a lot who got a B. this is not to say don't try - make your work as nice as possible - but the biggest thing exam boards will look for is testing, experimenting with varied materials (ie make sure you have tonals, paint work, acrylic, oil, pastels, watercolour, ink etc.) and high amounts of work. also, make sure you put maximum effort into your design ideas as they show the thought behind your work.

at the end of the day art should be something you enjoy and not something stressful. as long as you pass you've done well.
Hi! I found this idea of quantity over quality strange as my sister did about 7/30 pages of her book (A* quality) and came out with a B overall. Perhaps this goes to show the different types of examiners? :lol: as for both me and her it was quality over quantity.
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faloodeh
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(Original post by Lumi172)
Thank you very much for the detailed answer! Found it extremely helpful and I believe I have a better grasp of what to do. Thanks again for the help!
Np, I know how much of a pain it can be and how useless the art teachers may seem, so if you need any other advice feel free to pm
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whoknowsreally
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(Original post by Faloodeh)
Hi! I found this idea of quantity over quality strange as my sister did about 7/30 pages of her book (A* quality) and came out with a B overall. Perhaps this goes to show the different types of examiners? :lol: as for both me and her it was quality over quantity.
really? what exam board was she on?
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faloodeh
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(Original post by whoknowsreally)
really? what exam board was she on?
Obviously she had other books but none were really completed, I think she was on AQA.
Although I have been told that just completing your books is good enough for a good grade (quantity over quality.)
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