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How to prepare for A level psychology/biology/english literature? Watch

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    How can you prepare for A level psychology/biology/english literature?
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    read up on the specifications you will be doing for each of those subjects, for english you could start reading the texts you need and/or start making notes on them.
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    (Original post by mysticalrose)
    How can you prepare for A level psychology/biology/english literature?
    For psychology get a hold of the syllabus and learn all of the studies to the extent you know them more than the back of your own hand. Also, learn the real-world applications of them. Methodology is another big one of A level psychology course, so make sure you are clear on all of the disadvantages and advantages of each of the research methods.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    For psychology get a hold of the syllabus and learn all of the studies to the extent you know them more than the back of your own hand. Also, learn the real-world applications of them. Methodology is another big one of A level psychology course, so make sure you are clear on all of the disadvantages and advantages of each of the research methods.
    Thanks for this it will definitely be very helpful!
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    English lit is VERY different to GCSE- take it from someone who learned the hard way. Make sure you know which texts you will be studying as most, if not all, are old classics that you have to read independently. The poetry aspect is also very different, everything (as you would expect) is a lot harder. If you enjoyed it at GCSE you will enjoy it at A Level, but you need to be prepared to put in so much effort and do so much extra reading. Learn your assessment objectives, and be warned that at the start of the course you probably will get a C/D in your essays, but that is absolutely expected, don't be disheartened - you will improve! I dropped english about a month ago because I found it so boring and difficult, but it's not a bad course at all if you enjoy it. Good luck, and if you have any questions just ask! (I was on AQA if that's any help)
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    (Original post by SummerAmber00)
    English lit is VERY different to GCSE- take it from someone who learned the hard way. Make sure you know which texts you will be studying as most, if not all, are old classics that you have to read independently. The poetry aspect is also very different, everything (as you would expect) is a lot harder. If you enjoyed it at GCSE you will enjoy it at A Level, but you need to be prepared to put in so much effort and do so much extra reading. Learn your assessment objectives, and be warned that at the start of the course you probably will get a C/D in your essays, but that is absolutely expected, don't be disheartened - you will improve! I dropped english about a month ago because I found it so boring and difficult, but it's not a bad course at all if you enjoy it. Good luck, and if you have any questions just ask! (I was on AQA if that's any help)
    Thank you for replying this comment is very helpful! Because I do the new gcses im sure the a level course is similar in the sense that one of the exams are closed book. I will be doing aqa a spec in september. I was wondering could you possible provide me with a recommended reading list? Also what part of the course did you find particularly challenging?
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    (Original post by mysticalrose)
    Thank you for replying this comment is very helpful! Because I do the new gcses im sure the a level course is similar in the sense that one of the exams are closed book. I will be doing aqa a spec in september. I was wondering could you possible provide me with a recommended reading list? Also what part of the course did you find particularly challenging?

    Ah, the new GCSE should definitely help you ease into the course then! Both my exams were closed book at GCSE but one was open book at AS, however I didn't even look at them because you have to write so much that it's best to memorise quotes. On that note, start making revision notes from the beginning (goes for all your subjects) because you will go through content so quickly and you'll thank yourself in exam season. I also did AQA A, and we were given an anthology (I believe this part is similar to GCSE in terms of having to revise about 15-17 poems, correct me if I'm wrong?). I couldn't give you a reading list purely because you may study different texts, but for reference I did Tess of the D'urbervilles, Measure for Measure (you'll do a Shakespeare play), The Great Gatsby and Poetry-love through the ages, pre 1900s. I recommend looking at LitCharts and buying York Notes revision guides because you will need to learn different interpretations from different perspectives, and lots and lots of themes. If you have a quote and analysis to back it up, you can say whatever you want about a character - there is a lot more scope for discussion at AS. I found the Shakespeare aspect challenging because I really struggled to understand it, so make sure you watch your play on DVD as soon as you can to understand it better. I found it pretty hard to learn all the themes because there is so so much to learn, so like I said before, please put in work from the start!
    Sorry this is so long haha I didn't realise how much I had to say, but again feel free to ask anything and I can try my best to help!
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    These are exactly the subjects that I'm doing.
    For English, make sure you've read the books you're studying before you study them in class, this way you'll find it easier to refer to the end of the book/play etc as this is usually what the whole essay is centred around. Also take notes for everything your teacher says, as everything is important. Make sure you understand the key themes surrounding your texts.

    Next, psychology. I personally do not find psychology hard, and I have an awful memory. Just make sure you read through the content before you cover it in lesson (e.g., if you're told you'll be doing Asch in your next lesson, make sure you read and understand this content before the lesson) also, essays are very important, just write them out as you go along. I find making mindmaps/flash cards the easiest way to revise psychology, but that's just my opinion.

    Finally, biology. Biology is really difficult, it's such a step up from GCSE. I'm going to have to revise this through the summer. You need to make sure you cover the content after every lesson, THOROUGHLY!! I honestly would really recommended snap revise (if revising through videos is your thing) as it just makes everything simpler.

    Finally, don't be disheartened if you don't do so well in the first few months, they can be difficult subjects, just keep going!!
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    (Original post by SummerAmber00)
    Ah, the new GCSE should definitely help you ease into the course then! Both my exams were closed book at GCSE but one was open book at AS, however I didn't even look at them because you have to write so much that it's best to memorise quotes. On that note, start making revision notes from the beginning (goes for all your subjects) because you will go through content so quickly and you'll thank yourself in exam season. I also did AQA A, and we were given an anthology (I believe this part is similar to GCSE in terms of having to revise about 15-17 poems, correct me if I'm wrong?). I couldn't give you a reading list purely because you may study different texts, but for reference I did Tess of the D'urbervilles, Measure for Measure (you'll do a Shakespeare play), The Great Gatsby and Poetry-love through the ages, pre 1900s. I recommend looking at LitCharts and buying York Notes revision guides because you will need to learn different interpretations from different perspectives, and lots and lots of themes. If you have a quote and analysis to back it up, you can say whatever you want about a character - there is a lot more scope for discussion at AS. I found the Shakespeare aspect challenging because I really struggled to understand it, so make sure you watch your play on DVD as soon as you can to understand it better. I found it pretty hard to learn all the themes because there is so so much to learn, so like I said before, please put in work from the start!
    Sorry this is so long haha I didn't realise how much I had to say, but again feel free to ask anything and I can try my best to help!
    I actually appreciate this comment being long because it has reassured me that I will hopefully be ok with english lit a level. I am a very hard worker so doing the extra work won't be a chore for me😊! I was just wondering when they talk about critics what do they mean? Also I will be doing the great gatsby, othello and skirrid hill by owen sheers in September. However I am finiding it difficult to find skirrid hill in the shops. Apart from making notes,watching the film and reading the book what else could I do in your personal opinion?
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    (Original post by mysticalrose)
    I actually appreciate this comment being long because it has reassured me that I will hopefully be ok with english lit a level. I am a very hard worker so doing the extra work won't be a chore for me😊! I was just wondering when they talk about critics what do they mean? Also I will be doing the great gatsby, othello and skirrid hill by owen sheers in September. However I am finiding it difficult to find skirrid hill in the shops. Apart from making notes,watching the film and reading the book what else could I do in your personal opinion?
    You seem really prepared for this course already, that's so good! Critics is where you discuss different interpretations, for example in Gatsby you would listen to a podcast from an expert and listen to his opinions, and then in an essay you say "One critic, (name), argues that Gatsby is.........", trust me you'll get used to it. It is really hard to get your head around at first because you have AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 and AO5. But critics interpretation (AO5) is less important than context and analysis for example. Sounds a bit complicated but you'll understand it in no time. Also, buy all your texts from ebay second hand, because you're going to be scribbling all over them and you can get them for about £2. I think you should try and test yourself by explaining say, key themes, to other people to really see if you can understand/remember it. Re-read the book throughout the year and re-write out quotes until they stick in your head-best way to learn them!
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    (Original post by chloecrazy)
    These are exactly the subjects that I'm doing.
    For English, make sure you've read the books you're studying before you study them in class, this way you'll find it easier to refer to the end of the book/play etc as this is usually what the whole essay is centred around. Also take notes for everything your teacher says, as everything is important. Make sure you understand the key themes surrounding your texts.

    Next, psychology. I personally do not find psychology hard, and I have an awful memory. Just make sure you read through the content before you cover it in lesson (e.g., if you're told you'll be doing Asch in your next lesson, make sure you read and understand this content before the lesson) also, essays are very important, just write them out as you go along. I find making mindmaps/flash cards the easiest way to revise psychology, but that's just my opinion.

    Finally, biology. Biology is really difficult, it's such a step up from GCSE. I'm going to have to revise this through the summer. You need to make sure you cover the content after every lesson, THOROUGHLY!! I honestly would really recommended snap revise (if revising through videos is your thing) as it just makes everything simpler.

    Finally, don't be disheartened if you don't do so well in the first few months, they can be difficult subjects, just keep going!!
    Thanks for replying! I will deffo try using a few of these techniques at the beginning of As to see if it works for me😊
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    (Original post by SummerAmber00)
    You seem really prepared for this course already, that's so good! Critics is where you discuss different interpretations, for example in Gatsby you would listen to a podcast from an expert and listen to his opinions, and then in an essay you say "One critic, (name), argues that Gatsby is.........", trust me you'll get used to it. It is really hard to get your head around at first because you have AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 and AO5. But critics interpretation (AO5) is less important than context and analysis for example. Sounds a bit complicated but you'll understand it in no time. Also, buy all your texts from ebay second hand, because you're going to be scribbling all over them and you can get them for about £2. I think you should try and test yourself by explaining say, key themes, to other people to really see if you can understand/remember it. Re-read the book throughout the year and re-write out quotes until they stick in your head-best way to learn them!
    Thanks for this. I will deffo try all this during my summer holiday. Your comments have been really helpful and have deffo reassured me so thanks for replying!!!😊😊
 
 
 
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