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Physics/Chemistry/Maths degree? Watch

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    Hi everyone,
    I am currently in year 12 and am still struggling with what course I want to do at uni. The main things I'm worried about are employability and enjoyability.
    I do Physics, Chemistry, Maths and Further Maths and have completed an EPQ on aliens. My predicted grades are 4A*'s and an A in further maths(might ask for it to be changed after results day). I prefer chemistry to physics and maths but like them all really.
    At first, i was considering chemical engineering but I heard its dying?
    The other courses I am considering are
    Natural Sciences, Chemistry, chemical physics or (chemical) engineering.
    I am really struggling on what to chose and am currently revising topics that cover more than one uni course i.e thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, molecular physics etc... as well as preparing for many entrance tests (TSA NSAA PAT ENGAA -Oxbridge) and would really like to start to focus on one for the rest of the holidays.
    Thank you for any help in advance!
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    talking also do you think its possible to write on PS just talking about maths physics and chemistry that would enable me to apply to natural sciences, chemical engineering and maybe chemistry? I'm thinking of Oxbridge, UCL, Durham, Imperial, Bath and maybe Birmingham for the courses
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    (Original post by bruh2132)
    Hi everyone,
    I am currently in year 12 and am still struggling with what course I want to do at uni. The main things I'm worried about are employability and enjoyability.
    I do Physics, Chemistry, Maths and Further Maths and have completed an EPQ on aliens. My predicted grades are 4A*'s and an A in further maths(might ask for it to be changed after results day). I prefer chemistry to physics and maths but like them all really.
    At first, i was considering chemical engineering but I heard its dying?
    The other courses I am considering are
    Natural Sciences, Chemistry, chemical physics or (chemical) engineering.
    I am really struggling on what to chose and am currently revising topics that cover more than one uni course i.e thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, molecular physics etc... as well as preparing for many entrance tests (TSA NSAA PAT ENGAA -Oxbridge) and would really like to start to focus on one for the rest of the holidays.
    Thank you for any help in advance!
    How about a dual focused degree? Like Chemistry and Computer Science? Or does Pharmacy appeal to you?
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    (Original post by bruh2132)
    talking also do you think its possible to write on PS just talking about maths physics and chemistry that would enable me to apply to natural sciences, chemical engineering and maybe chemistry? I'm thinking of Oxbridge, UCL, Durham, Imperial, Bath and maybe Birmingham for the courses
    ChemEng is a very different course to the other two.
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    I did the same A-levels as you 4 years ago and got similar results to what you were predicted (well not quite that good, but close).
    I ended up doing chemistry, but that was my own preference so you shoudn't necessarily do the same.

    Any of those courses are good for employability, they all have specific jobs relating to that degree, as well as being very faourvoably looked apon if you're applying for an unrelated job that needs a degree. I would honestly recomend doing the one you're best at and enjoy the most.

    I would be cautious about doing chemical physics as a degree, because at every university I looked at what it really is is a joint honours degree in physics and chemistry. So you and the small number of other people doing the course (there is nowhere with a large physcial chemistry cohort) will actually be wandering between the physcis and chemistry depertement, sitting in on select lectures from both courses. This might not necessarly be a bad thing but you should be aware of what the couse actually is.

    As above, ChemEng is very different to the others you listed; it's a lot more engineering than chemistry. I've been told liking maths and liking chemistry isn't a great reason alone to do a ChemEng degree: you need to really like engineering too!

    If you're doing natural sciences it's only worth doing it at a university that does it properly. I looked at it at one unversity (I won't say wich cos they might have changed by now so it wouldn't be fair to them) and what you did was wander between the 3+ separate different deparments that made up the course, getting only small segments of each degree. As far as I know Cambridge is the only UK uni that does natural sciences properly (I applied there but didn't get in).

    (Original post by bruh2132)
    talking also do you think its possible to write on PS just talking about maths physics and chemistry that would enable me to apply to natural sciences, chemical engineering and maybe chemistry? I'm thinking of Oxbridge, UCL, Durham, Imperial, Bath and maybe Birmingham for the courses
    Writing about multiple subjects on your personal statement will weaken you application a little for each individual course, but if your grades really are as good as you say they are then you are pretty much guranteed to get offers from everywhere (or, in the case of Oxbridge, will get inveted to interview). I had to write a bit of a mix on my PS cos among my 5 UCAS choices was chemistry, materials science and natural science. For the record I got offers from everyone (well to be accurate, I got invited to the interview at Cambridge and then didn't get past that stage). So yeah, if your shortlist of 5 does end up being a bit of a spread that means you have to cover a lot on your PS, I wouldn't worry about it too much.
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    (Original post by jonzza_81)
    I did the same A-levels as you 4 years ago and got similar results to what you were predicted (well not quite that good, but close).
    I ended up doing chemistry, but that was my own preference so you shoudn't necessarily do the same.

    Any of those courses are good for employability, they all have specific jobs relating to that degree, as well as being very faourvoably looked apon if you're applying for an unrelated job that needs a degree. I would honestly recomend doing the one you're best at and enjoy the most.

    I would be cautious about doing chemical physics as a degree, because at every university I looked at what it really is is a joint honours degree in physics and chemistry. So you and the small number of other people doing the course (there is nowhere with a large physcial chemistry cohort) will actually be wandering between the physcis and chemistry depertement, sitting in on select lectures from both courses. This might not necessarly be a bad thing but you should be aware of what the couse actually is.

    As above, ChemEng is very different to the others you listed; it's a lot more engineering than chemistry. I've been told liking maths and liking chemistry isn't a great reason alone to do a ChemEng degree: you need to really like engineering too!

    If you're doing natural sciences it's only worth doing it at a university that does it properly. I looked at it at one unversity (I won't say wich cos they might have changed by now so it wouldn't be fair to them) and what you did was wander between the 3+ separate different deparments that made up the course, getting only small segments of each degree. As far as I know Cambridge is the only UK uni that does natural sciences properly (I applied there but didn't get in).



    Writing about multiple subjects on your personal statement will weaken you application a little for each individual course, but if your grades really are as good as you say they are then you are pretty much guranteed to get offers from everywhere (or, in the case of Oxbridge, will get inveted to interview). I had to write a bit of a mix on my PS cos among my 5 UCAS choices was chemistry, materials science and natural science. For the record I got offers from everyone (well to be accurate, I got invited to the interview at Cambridge and then didn't get past that stage). So yeah, if your shortlist of 5 does end up being a bit of a spread that means you have to cover a lot on your PS, I wouldn't worry about it too much.
    Thanks for the useful info as I'm in a similar situation. Thinking of doing nat sci at Cambridge but if i don't get in for thst probably a joint honors maths and physics. A lot of other unis natural science courses really aren't as open as Cambridge's, Durham for example doesn't have enough credits for you to keep your options open to potentially transfer into more than 2 subjects.
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    (Original post by jonzza_81)
    I did the same A-levels as you 4 years ago and got similar results to what you were predicted (well not quite that good, but close).
    I ended up doing chemistry, but that was my own preference so you shoudn't necessarily do the same.

    Any of those courses are good for employability, they all have specific jobs relating to that degree, as well as being very faourvoably looked apon if you're applying for an unrelated job that needs a degree. I would honestly recomend doing the one you're best at and enjoy the most.

    I would be cautious about doing chemical physics as a degree, because at every university I looked at what it really is is a joint honours degree in physics and chemistry. So you and the small number of other people doing the course (there is nowhere with a large physcial chemistry cohort) will actually be wandering between the physcis and chemistry depertement, sitting in on select lectures from both courses. This might not necessarly be a bad thing but you should be aware of what the couse actually is.

    As above, ChemEng is very different to the others you listed; it's a lot more engineering than chemistry. I've been told liking maths and liking chemistry isn't a great reason alone to do a ChemEng degree: you need to really like engineering too!

    If you're doing natural sciences it's only worth doing it at a university that does it properly. I looked at it at one unversity (I won't say wich cos they might have changed by now so it wouldn't be fair to them) and what you did was wander between the 3+ separate different deparments that made up the course, getting only small segments of each degree. As far as I know Cambridge is the only UK uni that does natural sciences properly (I applied there but didn't get in).



    Writing about multiple subjects on your personal statement will weaken you application a little for each individual course, but if your grades really are as good as you say they are then you are pretty much guranteed to get offers from everywhere (or, in the case of Oxbridge, will get inveted to interview). I had to write a bit of a mix on my PS cos among my 5 UCAS choices was chemistry, materials science and natural science. For the record I got offers from everyone (well to be accurate, I got invited to the interview at Cambridge and then didn't get past that stage). So yeah, if your shortlist of 5 does end up being a bit of a spread that means you have to cover a lot on your PS, I wouldn't worry about it too much.
    Thannk you very much for your advice ill make sure to do some more research into chem physics/nat sci!
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    (Original post by black1blade)
    Thanks for the useful info as I'm in a similar situation. Thinking of doing nat sci at Cambridge but if i don't get in for thst probably a joint honors maths and physics. A lot of other unis natural science courses really aren't as open as Cambridge's, Durham for example doesn't have enough credits for you to keep your options open to potentially transfer into more than 2 subjects.
    Yeah, as I said it was a while ago I looked into that and I didn't look at every natsci department, so don't just take my word for it, but that was the impression I got.
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    Read a book/s related to each degree you're considering, then think about which subject you most enjoy learning more about. Or, write a rough personal statement for each talking about your passion for the course etc and why you want to do it - by doing this you are likely to get a feel for which one you are most passionate about and interested in, and which one is most closely suited to your skills/knowledge.
 
 
 
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