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24 and looking for a complete career change. Please help srs. Watch

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    I'm 24 and a civil servant. It's a secure job and a great pension, but it's boring and not challenging me at all. There's progression there, but it's nigh on impossible to climb the ladder as most posts are earmarked before being advertised.

    I've recently got into a relationship with a doctor, and she has opened my eyes to that potential. Not being arrogant, but I think I have the ability to get through med school.

    My issue is, in school I was more concerned with messing around, I have a load of Bs at GCSE and then I did a level 3 course at college before going straight into work. So I would need to do some A levels, 3 to be precise and get an A in them all, 2 being biology and chemistry. I have no idea how I could find part time A level courses that wouldn't cost me literally thousands to then be able to put myself forward. I wouldn't want to quit my job and do full time A levels, but I would quit if I got them and would be offered a place at med school.

    Is anyone able to advise on how I could go about getting these A levels? I live in the North East of England.
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    (Original post by InvictusXI)
    I'm 24 and a civil servant. It's a secure job and a great pension, but it's boring and not challenging me at all. There's progression there, but it's nigh on impossible to climb the ladder as most posts are earmarked before being advertised.

    I've recently got into a relationship with a doctor, and she has opened my eyes to that potential. Not being arrogant, but I think I have the ability to get through med school.

    My issue is, in school I was more concerned with messing around, I have a load of Bs at GCSE and then I did a level 3 course at college before going straight into work. So I would need to do some A levels, 3 to be precise and get an A in them all, 2 being biology and chemistry. I have no idea how I could find part time A level courses that wouldn't cost me literally thousands to then be able to put myself forward. I wouldn't want to quit my job and do full time A levels, but I would quit if I got them and would be offered a place at med school.

    Is anyone able to advise on how I could go about getting these A levels? I live in the North East of England.
    There are other routes into medicine but they are what you might describe as complex.

    You could look into access to medicine courses. There are two that you would want to consider, both in the south of England, one at Sussex Downs and one at the College of West Anglia. They're a year long and you could apply anywhere with them. That obviously has its drawbacks for you but as they're well respected it could be the fastest and cheapest route in.

    Depending on where you want to go, some courses also have options like doing specific OU courses rather than A levels, which overrides the rather messy situation of doing A levels in science as a mature student. HYMS used to run this option and it may be more flexible for you. Other schools in the area may offer this option too.

    It's worth calling up some of the universities you'd be interested in and asking what your options are. You might also want to contact Newcastle/Durham as I recall they ran their own access scheme. Not sure if they still do but that might be perfect for you if you could get a place.

    I think you should also consider some alternatives in the Allied Health Professions. These might be more accessible for you in the short term.
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    Its a hard slog but it IS do-able. Be prepared to put the hours in, be tired/flat-out, and not have much time off.

    A 1 year Access to HE course is probably the best idea. Its funded. and its designed for people exactly like you - who didnt go to Uni at 18 but now want to. Several Unis accept Access for Medicine (Bristol for instance) check carefully with each Uni as some wont. If they do they will want high grades - so this will not be a breezy year of dabbling with study. You will have to give it your all. Some Unis also have Foundation courses for those who 'did the wrong subjects' at A level but they usually want A grades regardless. Again check each Uni - they will all be different. Usually for Mature applicants the GCSE requirements can be ignored but again check with each Uni.

    You will also need some relevant experience - both clinical and 'social care'. This takes some organising and 'doing' - and you'll have to have done it before you apply. With a cut-off of October for UCAS applications, I would advise you to do the Access/work-experience in parallel for a year without applying. Then once you have your results and know you are good enough for this - then apply.

    Unis value 'life experience' and 'life skills' for Medicine. You will have heaps more of this than any naive school-leaver. You will also cope better with any interview/stress situation. And you will ultimately make a good doctor for these reasons. If you want it badly enough, you'll put up with a tough year to make it all happen.

    Lots of info hereabout Apply for Medicine - including a chunk on work-experience : .https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine
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    (Original post by giella)
    There are other routes into medicine but they are what you might describe as complex.

    You could look into access to medicine courses. There are two that you would want to consider, both in the south of England, one at Sussex Downs and one at the College of West Anglia. They're a year long and you could apply anywhere with them. That obviously has its drawbacks for you but as they're well respected it could be the fastest and cheapest route in.

    Depending on where you want to go, some courses also have options like doing specific OU courses rather than A levels, which overrides the rather messy situation of doing A levels in science as a mature student. HYMS used to run this option and it may be more flexible for you. Other schools in the area may offer this option too.

    It's worth calling up some of the universities you'd be interested in and asking what your options are. You might also want to contact Newcastle/Durham as I recall they ran their own access scheme. Not sure if they still do but that might be perfect for you if you could get a place.

    I think you should also consider some alternatives in the Allied Health Professions. These might be more accessible for you in the short term.
    Thank you for this reply, I hadn't realised that medicine would have an "access to" course, I'll certainly look into this. Ideally I would prefer to remain in the North East as I know Northumbria/Newcastle unis are great. I'll be on the phone to them tomorrow, I've found myself a backup option of potentially doing a year higher education in sciences and then applying to Teeside as a physio, but I would much rather the medicine and doctor side so that's the one I'll chase.


    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Its a hard slog but it IS do-able. Be prepared to put the hours in, be tired/flat-out, and not have much time off.

    A 1 year Access to HE course is probably the best idea. Its funded. and its designed for people exactly like you - who didnt go to Uni at 18 but now want to. Several Unis accept Access for Medicine (Bristol for instance) check carefully with each Uni as some wont. If they do they will want high grades - so this will not be a breezy year of dabbling with study. You will have to give it your all. Some Unis also have Foundation courses for those who 'did the wrong subjects' at A level but they usually want A grades regardless. Again check each Uni - they will all be different. Usually for Mature applicants the GCSE requirements can be ignored but again check with each Uni.

    You will also need some relevant experience - both clinical and 'social care'. This takes some organising and 'doing' - and you'll have to have done it before you apply. With a cut-off of October for UCAS applications, I would advise you to do the Access/work-experience in parallel for a year without applying. Then once you have your results and know you are good enough for this - then apply.

    Unis value 'life experience' and 'life skills' for Medicine. You will have heaps more of this than any naive school-leaver. You will also cope better with any interview/stress situation. And you will ultimately make a good doctor for these reasons. If you want it badly enough, you'll put up with a tough year to make it all happen.

    Lots of info hereabout Apply for Medicine - including a chunk on work-experience : .https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine
    I'm fully prepared to put in the hard work and effort required, at a young age I was a moron, I've matured now and recognise the need for it. An access to course or foundation would be great, but I'm afraid that I would quit work, do that for a year and then not be accepted to the uni here, in which case I would be devastated and also unemployed. I'll certainly take this advice on board and get contacting the unis up here to discuss. Luckily my girlfriend would help me with the studying too if I needed it.

    I'll check that thread out, thank you!
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    You got the GCSE's required to do access courses so this is definitely an option, this is taken from a local college for entry requirements, 2 days a week:

    https://www.kirkleescollege.ac.uk/co...ploma-level-3/

    If you pick an access to medicine close to your target uni and score good marks then theres a pretty good chance you will be accepted after completion for that uni, even if you don't get into your target uni after this, its relatively easy to get into uni as a mature student, you'll always find a few willing to take you on.
 
 
 
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