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    Hey all!
    I'm considering studying sociology at Derby University but I'm 28 not been in full time education since I was 19 any advice for returning to learning?

    Also has anyone done sociology at Derby and what is the time table like?

    Thank you
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    I returned to education after 20 years and it is a culture shock. I had to do a year at college first which was a classroom environment and it was daunting at first but I am now missing being there. My class was mixed from 16 years old to 44 (I was 2nd oldest) but everyone mixed no problem. I am told that uni students care even less about your age so don't worry about that.
    you may find yourself getting tired for the first few weeks. Studying does that to you but it will pass once you adjust to it. You might actually enjoy going back to studying now that it is by choice
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    There are loads of mature students on TSR. I'm 69 and just finished my 2nd year at uni studying Criminology. Left school in 1963 aged 15. You will do just fine.X
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    (Original post by Phoenixess)
    Hey all!
    I'm considering studying sociology at Derby University but I'm 28 not been in full time education since I was 19 any advice for returning to learning?

    Also has anyone done sociology at Derby and what is the time table like?

    Thank you
    My advice would be dont worry about the age as study skills can be learnt.

    What I would say is its £50000 worth of quasi debt, so spend it wisely and do consider why you have chosen sociology plus what you want that degree to do for you.in terms of employability.
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    Just do it!

    I recently decided to quit full time living wage employment, now in my second year of a Comp Sci degree and absolutely loving every moment of it.

    The best decision I've ever made.

    As others have said, just make sure it's a subject you're passionate about, doing 3 years of something you don't enjoy at this age isn't a good idea.
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    Other considerations aside, in terms of academic preparation you may want to consider taking one or two A-levels (either self-studying or via distance learning and entering the exams as an external candidate and a local exam centre) or pursuing an access course. Both routes can help you reacquaint yourself with your old study skills, with the latter usually having more focused preparation in this area (which may be more or less useful depending on your background). The latter route is, however, typically more expensive. The university may also offer a foundation year course, which leads on to your degree of choice after successful completion - this would be similar to the access route, except it would be funded by SFE/SLC (if the foundation year is not "built-in" to the course however this would use up the "gift" year of funding).

    Of course none of these are necessary (unless the university requires them explicitly from prospective mature applicants, which I doubt), and you'll probably catch up quite quickly on this front once you begin the course anyway. It would probably be helpful at least to look over some A-level material and try some related past exam questions with the material in front of you beforehand. Focus on thinking about how you would respond to answers, how to structure them and so on, more than recall ability.
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    Hey thanks guys some fab advice!
    So I have completed an access course with the open university a few years ago in History of Art. All my A levels and AS levels were in English, law, psychology and art history. I have had major health complications and life set backs but currently I'm on the up and feel this would be a good next step for my future. I've just had to give up my home due to anti social behaviour issues, my ex walked out nearly a year ago and I lost my job 12 months ago so I have no dependent children and I'm extremely passionate about sociology and social aspects and how fast it is changing with social changes and political changes. I've dabbled with genealogy and find lives fascinating I could go on.
    But for me right now I believe I'm in a fortunate place to go and emerse myself in something worthwhile.
    I've spoke to the university this morning they said maybe an option for me to do foundation or access route for a year. Which would be more beneficial?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Other considerations aside, in terms of academic preparation you may want to consider taking one or two A-levels (either self-studying or via distance learning and entering the exams as an external candidate and a local exam centre) or pursuing an access course. Both routes can help you reacquaint yourself with your old study skills, with the latter usually having more focused preparation in this area (which may be more or less useful depending on your background). The latter route is, however, typically more expensive. The university may also offer a foundation year course, which leads on to your degree of choice after successful completion - this would be similar to the access route, except it would be funded by SFE/SLC (if the foundation year is not "built-in" to the course however this would use up the "gift" year of funding).

    Of course none of these are necessary (unless the university requires them explicitly from prospective mature applicants, which I doubt), and you'll probably catch up quite quickly on this front once you begin the course anyway. It would probably be helpful at least to look over some A-level material and try some related past exam questions with the material in front of you beforehand. Focus on thinking about how you would respond to answers, how to structure them and so on, more than recall ability.
    This is a good idea and I have some materials that I can forward to you. Essays and slides from higher sociology which was on my access course. You can use them as written work but they would be of use as study aids
    • Very Important Poster
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    (Original post by Phoenixess)
    Hey thanks guys some fab advice!
    So I have completed an access course with the open university a few years ago in History of Art. All my A levels and AS levels were in English, law, psychology and art history. I have had major health complications and life set backs but currently I'm on the up and feel this would be a good next step for my future. I've just had to give up my home due to anti social behaviour issues, my ex walked out nearly a year ago and I lost my job 12 months ago so I have no dependent children and I'm extremely passionate about sociology and social aspects and how fast it is changing with social changes and political changes. I've dabbled with genealogy and find lives fascinating I could go on.
    But for me right now I believe I'm in a fortunate place to go and emerse myself in something worthwhile.
    I've spoke to the university this morning they said maybe an option for me to do foundation or access route for a year. Which would be more beneficial?
    Thanks

    Access course involves taking an advanced learner loan put which is written off if you finish the course. Its normally taken at an FE college. If you get decent enough marks then you can apply elsewhere.

    Foundation year involved a normal student loan and studying at the university. You will get a guaranteed place on the course if you get certain grades. You get to familairise yourself with the lecturers and uni.

    Your choice.
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    (Original post by Phoenixess)
    I've spoke to the university this morning they said maybe an option for me to do foundation or access route for a year. Which would be more beneficial?
    Thanks
    I can only go on my experience but I did an access course in my mid 20s to get back in to uni and I felt it was probably better than if I had taken a foundation year. One of the best things about the access course (for me) is that it was all mature students and the teaching was done in a very "relaxed", adult way. My best advice would be to just do the work as it is set and ask for help on things you don't understand and you'll crush uni.
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    Not sure about foundation year, but I know access courses are part time and will require some form of work to supplement your income/survive.

    With a foundation year it is funded through SFE so you will lose your gift year, which in layman's terms means you need to be damn sure this is what you want as the funding won't be in place to switch to a different course if you change your mind after the first year.
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    Hi everyone just an update! I got unconditional offer from Derby Uni starting this September going to do the foundation year which covers lots of subjects so if I did change after foundation I could do anything like that but think I'm going to stay with sociology!
    Very excited to say the least now do I choose halls or private accomadation eeeeep !
    Thanks again for amazing advice
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    (Original post by Phoenixess)
    Hi everyone just an update! I got unconditional offer from Derby Uni starting this September going to do the foundation year which covers lots of subjects so if I did change after foundation I could do anything like that but think I'm going to stay with sociology!
    Very excited to say the least now do I choose halls or private accomadation eeeeep !
    Thanks again for amazing advice
    I'd go halls for first year, you will have the chance to meet more people to go private with together next year.

    if you go private first year, you run the risk of getting bundled with nightmare house mates for the next year.
 
 
 
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