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    Hi,
    I am currently doing four A levels (Physics, chemistry, maths and biology) and am thinking what to choose for uni, I am interested in both computer science and medicine so I was thinking will it be possible for me to do an undergraduate in computer science and then go to medical school ?
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    Yes you could do that, but only with certain universities, as some universities only accept particular degrees in their entry requirements (whereas other unis accept any degree). Also note that in the unis that do accept any degree, other applicants to graduate entry medicine courses who have a bio science degree or health science degree will have a competitive advantage. The best thing you can do to ensure your competitive edge with a computer science degree, is to get a first.

    All the best.
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    (Original post by Funkymintbrother)
    Yes you could do that, but only with certain universities, as some universities only accept particular degrees in their entry requirements (whereas other unis accept any degree). Also note that in the unis that do accept any degree, other applicants to graduate entry medicine courses who have a bio science degree or health science degree will have a competitive advantage. The best thing you can do to ensure your competitive edge with a computer science degree, is to get a first.

    All the best.
    Thanks for the reply, do you happen to know, if Canadian universities (particularly uaberta) accept any degree ?
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    (Original post by TheAwesomeGuy)
    Thanks for the reply, do you happen to know, if Canadian universities (particularly uaberta) accept any degree ?
    Why haven't you just checked their course entry requirements online? I'm not really struck by your levels of enthusiasm and commitment, both of which would be prerequisites in the completion of successive maths and medical degrees.
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    (Original post by DrSocSciences)
    Why haven't you just checked their course entry requirements online? I'm not really struck by your levels of enthusiasm and commitment, both of which would be prerequisites in the completion of successive maths and medical degrees.
    I am sorry, I should have mentioned that I checked in their website and didn't quite understand what they have written since I am new to this, and I also searched on google, many sites say go for it, many say don't, so I posted this question here to be clear whether or not if this possible.
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    Why not just do medical engineering or something like that instead?
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    (Original post by TheAwesomeGuy)
    Thanks for the reply, do you happen to know, if Canadian universities (particularly uaberta) accept any degree ?
    I'm not familiar with universities outside the UK and how their requirements specifically work, but I've had a quick look at Alberta's website.

    Here's a quote from their entry requirements for their Doctor of Medicine degree:
    "There is no direct entry from high school into the Doctor of Medicine program. Applicants must have obtained a baccalaureate degree prior to admission to the Doctor of Medicine program, completing a minimum of 2 years of transferable coursework (★60, of which ★30 must be taken full-time in one Fall/Winter) (★ = units of course weight)
    To be eligible to apply, a minimum GPA of 3.30 is required for Alberta residents and 3.50 for Non-Alberta residents."

    So for this university in particular, you need a degree prior getting into the med course. Though I don't know what it means by "transferable coursework", and I don't know how GPAs work either. Yes, I am ignorant in regards to grading systems abroad.

    Also, have you considering studying a masters in Bioinformatics after a Computer Science degree, instead of pursuing medicine afterwards?
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    (Original post by Devify)
    Why not just do medical engineering or something like that instead?
    Because I like both computer science and medicine (neurology), and the thing is that if I spend the undergrad years doing something I like (computer science) instead of something I don't like, it would be much better, wouldn't it?
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    (Original post by TheAwesomeGuy)
    Because I like both computer science and medicine (neurology), and the thing is that if I spend the undergrad years doing something I like (computer science) instead of something I don't like, it would be much better, wouldn't it?
    Oh, so that's how it works over there. My previous advice is moot.

    Just call up each and every university you're considering and ask them. That's the easiest way to find out what you need to know.
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    (Original post by Funkymintbrother)
    Oh, so that's how it works over there. My previous advice is moot.

    Just call up each and every university you're considering and ask them. That's the easiest way to find out what you need to know.
    Yeah I think I would do that, thanks for your support
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    Canadian medical schools should normally require two introductory courses in physics, two in biology, and 4 in chemistry (2 general chem and 2 organic chem, or possibly 1 organic and 1 biochem), as they typically follow the US model (and hence a medical degree from Canada at an accredited university normally allows you to enter The Match and practice in the US without further study or qualification).

    In the UK there are enough courses with different entry requirements that you will be able to find 4 that accept a CS degree. However, aiming for GEM instead of UG medicine is something of a mistake, I believe. GEM is MUCH more competitive than UG med (which is already very competitive) and you may need to apply several years running before you get in, even if you otherwise are a model candidate, simply because there are so few spaces on these courses (or you might need to apply for/enter into an UG course as a mature student).

    That said, depending on what aspect of CS you're interested in you needn't necessarily get an UG degree in the subejct to pursue research in the area with a medical background. Bioinformatics applicants often are split between bio/medical background individuals and CS backgrounds, and the PhD programmes are inevitably tailored to the individual candidate anyway - they will ensure you have suitable training in relevant aspects of programming to ensure you can do your research (and vice versa with biology training for CS candidates, although arguably it's easier to teach programming than molecular biology).

    I would suggest applying for medicine (possibly having some kind of bioinformatics leaning course as your 5th choice, if possible) and then intercalate in that area if possible or consider e.g. MBPhD opportunities, or doing a PhD later in your career after core training. It's not uncommon in some specialities to undertake an MD (the UK kind, a 2 year advised research programme) or sometimes PhD during training, typically after a couple years of specialty training, possibly maintaining some clinical attachments during the PhD depending on whether the programme is linked to a specific hospital or somesuch.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Canadian medical schools should normally require two introductory courses in physics, two in biology, and 4 in chemistry (2 general chem and 2 organic chem, or possibly 1 organic and 1 biochem), as they typically follow the US model (and hence a medical degree from Canada at an accredited university normally allows you to enter The Match and practice in the US without further study or qualification).

    In the UK there are enough courses with different entry requirements that you will be able to find 4 that accept a CS degree. However, aiming for GEM instead of UG medicine is something of a mistake, I believe. GEM is MUCH more competitive than UG med (which is already very competitive) and you may need to apply several years running before you get in, even if you otherwise are a model candidate, simply because there are so few spaces on these courses (or you might need to apply for/enter into an UG course as a mature student).

    That said, depending on what aspect of CS you're interested in you needn't necessarily get an UG degree in the subejct to pursue research in the area with a medical background. Bioinformatics applicants often are split between bio/medical background individuals and CS backgrounds, and the PhD programmes are inevitably tailored to the individual candidate anyway - they will ensure you have suitable training in relevant aspects of programming to ensure you can do your research (and vice versa with biology training for CS candidates, although arguably it's easier to teach programming than molecular biology).

    I would suggest applying for medicine (possibly having some kind of bioinformatics leaning course as your 5th choice, if possible) and then intercalate in that area if possible or consider e.g. MBPhD opportunities, or doing a PhD later in your career after core training. It's not uncommon in some specialities to undertake an MD (the UK kind, a 2 year advised research programme) or sometimes PhD during training, typically after a couple years of specialty training, possibly maintaining some clinical attachments during the PhD depending on whether the programme is linked to a specific hospital or somesuch.
    Thanks, that's a great advice but I don't like bioinformatics that much and I don't want to combine the two.
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    (Original post by TheAwesomeGuy)
    Thanks, that's a great advice but I don't like bioinformatics that much and I don't want to combine the two.
    In that case all you're doing is "collecting degrees" which is pretty pointless. I would recommend you spend some time reflecting on what you are actually interested in pursuing as a career because you have a genuine personal interest in it, rather than some poor concept of "prestige" or potential to generate personal wealth.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    In that case all you're doing is "collecting degrees" which is pretty pointless. I would recommend you spend some time reflecting on what you are actually interested in pursuing as a career because you have a genuine personal interest in it, rather than some poor concept of "prestige" or potential to generate personal wealth.
    In the undergrad years I have to choose any of the majors but I wanted to choose CS because that's what I like and also if circumstances arise that I cannot do medicine due to personal reasons I will still have a CS degree and can continue my life with it. I asked this question in the thread because I thought I can only do medicine related courses during undergrad.
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    (Original post by TheAwesomeGuy)
    In the undergrad years I have to choose any of the majors but I wanted to choose CS because that's what I like and also if circumstances arise that I cannot do medicine due to personal reasons I will still have a CS degree and can continue my life with it. I asked this question in the thread because I thought I can only do medicine related courses during undergrad.
    My point is, if you're interested in medicine is there any particular reason you aren't applying to a standard UG medicine course in the UK, as opposed to studying GEM in the UK or abroad? It just needlessly extends an already long training period.

    However yes in the US and Canada medicine is only a graduate course and any undergraduate major that has also fulfilled the premed course requirements would be eligible to apply. In some courses that's easier than others (e.g. Biochemistry and related courses), and you may find your flexibility in the course is somewhat limited as a result - also depending on course sequencing, it's possible you won't be able to take the MCAT until after you graduate and end up with a "glide year" as a result (typically if you aren't able to start the chemistry sequence until junior/3rd year of the standard 4 year bachelors course - this is unusual and can be avoided by ensuring you being the chemistry sequence as early as possible).

    You could theoretically take the MCAT without having taken all the premed courses but you're likely to find it more difficult and have to invest more time and/or money in prepping for it to account for this. The only requirement is to have completed all the premed courses by the time you graduate, although if you have more than one or two to take in your final year (if you apply in penultimate year) they may be wary of offering you an acceptance.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    My point is, if you're interested in medicine is there any particular reason you aren't applying to a standard UG medicine course in the UK, as opposed to studying GEM in the UK or abroad? It just needlessly extends an already long training period.

    However yes in the US and Canada medicine is only a graduate course and any undergraduate major that has also fulfilled the premed course requirements would be eligible to apply. In some courses that's easier than others (e.g. Biochemistry and related courses), and you may find your flexibility in the course is somewhat limited as a result - also depending on course sequencing, it's possible you won't be able to take the MCAT until after you graduate and end up with a "glide year" as a result (typically if you aren't able to start the chemistry sequence until junior/3rd year of the standard 4 year bachelors course - this is unusual and can be avoided by ensuring you being the chemistry sequence as early as possible).

    You could theoretically take the MCAT without having taken all the premed courses but you're likely to find it more difficult and have to invest more time and/or money in prepping for it to account for this. The only requirement is to have completed all the premed courses by the time you graduate, although if you have more than one or two to take in your final year (if you apply in penultimate year) they may be wary of offering you an acceptance.
    Actually I am not living in the UK so studying there would be very very expensive for me,(but UK was my first choice) so I have thought to study in Canada as education is less expensive there. If money was not a problem I would have definitely gone there.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    In some courses that's easier than others (e.g. Biochemistry and related courses), and you may find your flexibility in the course is somewhat limited as a result - also depending on course sequencing, it's possible you won't be able to take the MCAT until after you graduate and end up with a "glide year" as a result (typically if you aren't able to start the chemistry sequence until junior/3rd year of the standard 4 year bachelors course - this is unusual and can be avoided by ensuring you being the chemistry sequence as early as possible).

    You could theoretically take the MCAT without having taken all the premed courses but you're likely to find it more difficult and have to invest more time and/or money in prepping for it to account for this. The only requirement is to have completed all the premed courses by the time you graduate, although if you have more than one or two to take in your final year (if you apply in penultimate year) they may be wary of offering you an acceptance.
    You will need O-chem in order to do well on the Physical section of the MCAT. The Organic Chemistry for Biologists stream does not cover 1-H or 13C NMR + IR spectroscopy in enough detail (or have enough practice examples available) for a student to conceptually understand how to get a molecular structure/identify functional groups from NMR + IR spectra charts. Even review books/online resources don't provide enough data.
 
 
 
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