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A-level options help? Watch

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    I want to choose my a-levels but I'm not sure what to pick
    The ones that stand out to me are:
    Chemistry
    Biology
    Law
    Psychology
    English literature
    French

    Which would be a good combination for someone looking at doing something in law?
    (I also won't consider maths as I m horrible at it)
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    (Original post by GoliathBeetle998)
    I want to choose my a-levels but I'm not sure what to pick
    The ones that stand out to me are:
    Chemistry
    Biology
    Law
    Psychology
    English literature
    French

    Which would be a good combination for someone looking at doing something in law?
    (I also won't consider maths as I m horrible at it)
    This is from Informed Choices, a document detailing recommended A level for specific degree course. It's by the Russell Group universities.

    Law
    ESSENTIAL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS
    Usually none, although a few universities require English.

    USEFUL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS
    History; other facilitating subjects.
    There really are no essential subjects for Law. Maybe one choice should involve essay or report writing. History gives you good relevant skills for Law but is not essential.
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    (Original post by GoliathBeetle998)
    I want to choose my a-levels but I'm not sure what to pick
    The ones that stand out to me are:
    Chemistry
    Biology
    Law
    Psychology
    English literature
    French

    Which would be a good combination for someone looking at doing something in law?
    (I also won't consider maths as I m horrible at it)
    I did AS Law about 6 years ago now and I would not recommend it. It's a really bad course from what I remember and I just wanted to sleep during the classes. It's not even necessary to be able to do a Law degree. From the rest, just pick ones you enjoy the most, I think you can do Law with any combination of the rest of your options.
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    Well there isn't really "something" in law - you either want to become a qualified solicitor or barrister, or you don't. The former currently require a law degree, the latter obviously does not.

    In any case, Law doesn't really have an specific course requirements, so take the ones you enjoy the most and are most likely to do well in. Things to consider are how your particular style of learning conforms to each course - if you don't want to do oral presentations, avoid French (also probably English Lit, although I'm not 100% certain); if you find lab sessions and writing up lab reports extremely boring, don't do sciences; if you hate writing essays, avoid Psychology and English, etc, etc.

    While essay subjects can be helpful for preparing you for when you being a degree in law, they won't be necessarily better for actually getting accepted onto such a degree - and many students go into these courses with a background in sciences rather than essay subjects and do very well.
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    I did AS Law about 6 years ago now and I would not recommend it. It's a really bad course from what I remember and I just wanted to sleep during the classes. It's not even necessary to be able to do a Law degree. From the rest, just pick ones you enjoy the most, I think you can do Law with any combination of the rest of your options.
    Oh no!I hope I will find the course interesting haha
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    (Original post by SGHD26716)
    This is from Informed Choices, a document detailing recommended A level for specific degree course. It's by the Russell Group universities.

    Law
    ESSENTIAL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS
    Usually none, although a few universities require English.

    USEFUL ADVANCED LEVEL QUALIFICATIONS
    History; other facilitating subjects.
    There really are no essential subjects for Law. Maybe one choice should involve essay or report writing. History gives you good relevant skills for Law but is not essential.
    Sadly, I didn't take history at GCSE so I can't pick it as an a-level
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    (Original post by GoliathBeetle998)
    Sadly, I didn't take history at GCSE so I can't pick it as an a-level
    Still do English. What about economics?
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Well there isn't really "something" in law - you either want to become a qualified solicitor or barrister, or you don't. The former currently require a law degree, the latter obviously does not.

    In any case, Law doesn't really have an specific course requirements, so take the ones you enjoy the most and are most likely to do well in. Things to consider are how your particular style of learning conforms to each course - if you don't want to do oral presentations, avoid French (also probably English Lit, although I'm not 100% certain); if you find lab sessions and writing up lab reports extremely boring, don't do sciences; if you hate writing essays, avoid Psychology and English, etc, etc.

    While essay subjects can be helpful for preparing you for when you being a degree in law, they won't be necessarily better for actually getting accepted onto such a degree - and many students go into these courses with a background in sciences rather than essay subjects and do very well.
    Ah I'm picking French as I am French and fluent already, so the qualification is like an easy option for me
    As for englih lit, it's one of my best subjects as I'm good at writing critical essays and analysing
    Psychology is something I have looked into for things like criminology and criminal profiling

    What I meant by something is that law has a wide range of things a person could do, I'm interested in law and doing a job within that section which could be anything
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    (Original post by SGHD26716)
    Still do English. What about economics?
    The sixth form I go to won't allow economics AND law as it is in the same 'lesson block' so it would be timetable-d at the same time, same with business studies
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    (Original post by Cubone-r)
    I did AS Law about 6 years ago now and I would not recommend it. It's a really bad course from what I remember and I just wanted to sleep during the classes. It's not even necessary to be able to do a Law degree. From the rest, just pick ones you enjoy the most, I think you can do Law with any combination of the rest of your options.
    ^ I second this
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    (Original post by GoliathBeetle998)
    The sixth form I go to won't allow economics AND law as it is in the same 'lesson block' so it would be timetable-d at the same time, same with business studies
    Law a level doesn't have a great reputation. Some universities don't actually want you to do it, like at LSE.

    I would do English, Economics, and a science like biology or chemistry (probably biology due to less maths)
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    (Original post by GoliathBeetle998)
    I want to choose my a-levels but I'm not sure what to pick
    The ones that stand out to me are:
    Chemistry
    Biology
    Law
    Psychology
    English literature
    French

    Which would be a good combination for someone looking at doing something in law?
    (I also won't consider maths as I m horrible at it)
    English lit, French and Chemistry /Biology would be a good combo. It'll show you've got the linguistic ability but also the analytical skills that come with a science subject .

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    (Original post by GoliathBeetle998)
    Ah I'm picking French as I am French and fluent already, so the qualification is like an easy option for me
    As for englih lit, it's one of my best subjects as I'm good at writing critical essays and analysing
    Psychology is something I have looked into for things like criminology and criminal profiling

    What I meant by something is that law has a wide range of things a person could do, I'm interested in law and doing a job within that section which could be anything
    A-levels in the students native language typically are usually accepted as part of the standard 3 A-level entry requirements at universities - it's usually acceptable as a 4th A-level.

    Politics and legislation, social policy, socio-legal studies and law are all separate but related areas. It's important to understand the differences in these and the careers associated the them. Law generally refers to the practice of law as a qualified solicitor or barrister - i.e. a lawyer.

    Socio-legal studies are an area of academic research, and it's not really something you get a job in, outside of a university. Social policy is related to politics and legislation but to some extent suggests the NGO/practicalities of working in social care sectors, as opposed to Parliament etc as suggested by the latter. Criminology relates to both social policy academics and practice and socio-legal studies in different ways. It's not really a "career" outside of academia however (as with socio-legal studies).

    That said courses in these areas at university still typically have no specific subject requirements, although often an essay based subject can be useful preparation for these areas (such as English Literature or Psychology). I'm not really sure why you included biology or chemistry in the list as you've expressed no interest in either of these subjects in your comments.

    Also regarding A-level History, not all schools require you to have studied GCSE History to take it at A-level. In fact as I understand there isn't much in common between them, either in content or style. You may wish to consider Economics, Geography or Government & Politics as you seem very interested in the social sciences, and these are all relevant in different ways to any social science, as well as may give you a taste of these subjects earlier. However if you are considering Economics I would strongly recommend taking A-level Maths as you will need to cover this same material by the end of any degree in Economics regardless, and the top Economics courses require it specifically anyway.
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    (Original post by SGHD26716)
    Law a level doesn't have a great reputation. Some universities don't actually want you to do it, like at LSE.

    I would do English, Economics, and a science like biology or chemistry (probably biology due to less maths)
    Just to note, Law is actually listed as one of their "generally preferred" subjects here.
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    (Original post by artful_lounger)
    Just to note, Law is actually listed as one of their "generally preferred" subjects here.
    I shall have the source "dealt with".

    Which? said law is not preferred by LSE, hence the confusion. Thanks for pointing it out

    https://university.which.co.uk/advic...ut-a-level-law
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    (Original post by GoliathBeetle998)
    Ah I'm picking French as I am French and fluent already, so the qualification is like an easy option for me
    As for englih lit, it's one of my best subjects as I'm good at writing critical essays and analysing
    Psychology is something I have looked into for things like criminology and criminal profiling

    What I meant by something is that law has a wide range of things a person could do, I'm interested in law and doing a job within that section which could be anything
    I definitely recommend law! It was a great subject to study. I did majority criminal and bits of civil process (3 years ago now) but nevertheless my interest grown and I am now approaching the completion of my final year law degree ( hoping to get through it!)
 
 
 
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