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    I'm a recent MPharm graduate and I'm incredibly excited about my future career in pharmacy. Here's a few reasons why:

    1) Patients - Pharmacy is incredibly patient centred. Ok, you'll never be plunging your heart into a patient's chest to massage their heart back into rhythm, but the constant contact and positive relationship I've seen community pharmacists have with patients can be equally beneficial to them. Medicines are hugely complex and often a great cause for concern amongst patients, and giving sound advice week in week out whilst building a lifetime rapport with patients who value and rely on your expertise creates the basis for an incredibly rewarding career.
    In hospital pharmacy, you may not see the same patients over such a great length of time in community, but you will be just as valuable to them. Pharmacists have an incredibly scientific knowledge base, more so than most if not all other practitioners, yet are trained in a way that enables them to explain simply these scientific concepts to patients enough to allow that patient to understand their care. As a hospital pharmacist you'll have to understand lung, liver, kidney, heart and many more results and work out what implication this has on the medicines the patient is taking - do you have to stop a medicine because the patient's kidneys are no longer powerful enough to wash it out of the body? Is the patient's liver too damaged to metabolise the drug? The patient can't swallow any more but desperately needs their Parkinson's tablets in the next 30 minutes - how are you going to make sure they get them?
    Pharmacy is about patients, problem solving and professionalism.

    2) Diversity of an MPharm degree - there are more things you can do with an MPharm degree than you can shake multiple sticks at. Hospital, community, industry (GSK/AZ/Pfizer) academia, clinical commissioning groups, GP practice, A&E departments, councils, the government, start up companies, finance, professional bodies and healthcare organisations, research companies, and so so much more. And what's more, picking one career route doesn't limit you - you can chop and change between them or even pick a few! One of my lecturers taught us a few days a week, worked in a hospice a few more and in community for another! I think having such a diverse and varied career would suit me really well, it certainly keeps things interesting!

    3) Employment prospects - Yes, there are more schools of pharmacy, and yes, that means more graduates, but with all the career options above and many many more opening up all the time, employment prospects are good and improving all the time.

    4) Evolution of the profession - Pharmacy is in a unique position as a profession, on the brink of expanding in many different ways to fit the needs of a constantly evolving healthcare system. As a graduate going out into the professional world, you have as much leverage as anyone in evolving the profession how you see fit, meaning you can easily create a career path you will enjoy - perhaps even if it doesn't yet exist!

    5) You are an expert in medicines, and both a practitioner and a scientist - Medics (doctors) are great, but their area of expertise is in diagnosis and non-pharmacological treatment. Pharmacists are experts in medicines and there are no other professions with such a sound grasp of the science and practice behind medicines. Pharmacists are also uniquely positioned between science and practice - no practitioner is as much a scientist and no scientist is as much a practitioner as a pharmacist is.
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    Be honest.Who paid you to post this ?
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    TROLL :rofl:
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    (Original post by APaterson)
    I'm a recent MPharm graduate and I'm incredibly excited about my future career in pharmacy. Here's a few reasons why:

    1) Patients - Pharmacy is incredibly patient centred. Ok, you'll never be plunging your heart into a patient's chest to massage their heart back into rhythm, but the constant contact and positive relationship I've seen community pharmacists have with patients can be equally beneficial to them. Medicines are hugely complex and often a great cause for concern amongst patients, and giving sound advice week in week out whilst building a lifetime rapport with patients who value and rely on your expertise creates the basis for an incredibly rewarding career.
    In hospital pharmacy, you may not see the same patients over such a great length of time in community, but you will be just as valuable to them. Pharmacists have an incredibly scientific knowledge base, more so than most if not all other practitioners, yet are trained in a way that enables them to explain simply these scientific concepts to patients enough to allow that patient to understand their care. As a hospital pharmacist you'll have to understand lung, liver, kidney, heart and many more results and work out what implication this has on the medicines the patient is taking - do you have to stop a medicine because the patient's kidneys are no longer powerful enough to wash it out of the body? Is the patient's liver too damaged to metabolise the drug? The patient can't swallow any more but desperately needs their Parkinson's tablets in the next 30 minutes - how are you going to make sure they get them?
    Pharmacy is about patients, problem solving and professionalism.

    2) Diversity of an MPharm degree - there are more things you can do with an MPharm degree than you can shake multiple sticks at. Hospital, community, industry (GSK/AZ/Pfizer) academia, clinical commissioning groups, GP practice, A&E departments, councils, the government, start up companies, finance, professional bodies and healthcare organisations, research companies, and so so much more. And what's more, picking one career route doesn't limit you - you can chop and change between them or even pick a few! One of my lecturers taught us a few days a week, worked in a hospice a few more and in community for another! I think having such a diverse and varied career would suit me really well, it certainly keeps things interesting!

    3) Employment prospects - Yes, there are more schools of pharmacy, and yes, that means more graduates, but with all the career options above and many many more opening up all the time, employment prospects are good and improving all the time.

    4) Evolution of the profession - Pharmacy is in a unique position as a profession, on the brink of expanding in many different ways to fit the needs of a constantly evolving healthcare system. As a graduate going out into the professional world, you have as much leverage as anyone in evolving the profession how you see fit, meaning you can easily create a career path you will enjoy - perhaps even if it doesn't yet exist!

    5) You are an expert in medicines, and both a practitioner and a scientist - Medics (doctors) are great, but their area of expertise is in diagnosis and non-pharmacological treatment. Pharmacists are experts in medicines and there are no other professions with such a sound grasp of the science and practice behind medicines. Pharmacists are also uniquely positioned between science and practice - no practitioner is as much a scientist and no scientist is as much a practitioner as a pharmacist is.
    Thank you for the insight. I am currently deciding between pharmacy and biochemistry (I want to go into research), and just wanted to ask: Can you enter into a wide variety of research opportunities that range from neuro-pathways to cancer, or is pharmacy more restricted when it comes to research?
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    (Original post by bobby147)
    Be honest.Who paid you to post this ?
    Exactly what I was thinking!!! LOL
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    I looked into Pharmacy two years ago when I was picking my A-Levels. I decided against it because the RPS hasn't implemented a cap on the number of Pharmacy school places, meaning there are now a stupid amount of schools churning out pharmacy grads whilst the government has been cutting budgets. I also read that getting a hospital placement was extremely difficult due to cuts and the number of graduates.
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    This sounds like University propaganda to me...most likely written by someone affiliated to a School of Pharmacy. It could also be someone affiliated with a large Multiple. It's a bit obvious and over the top - hint to the author, if you want to pull the wool over people's eyes, try and be a bit more subtle!
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    I looked into Pharmacy two years ago when I was picking my A-Levels. I decided against it because the RPS hasn't implemented a cap on the number of Pharmacy school places, meaning there are now a stupid amount of schools churning out pharmacy grads whilst the government has been cutting budgets. I also read that getting a hospital placement was extremely difficult due to cuts and the number of graduates.
    Just to clarify, the RPS cannot do that, it is a representative body for pharmacists. A cap must be put in place by the government. I wrote to my MP about this and also the Minister in charge of Universities and received some guff about pharmacy being a well-paid and highly valued degree and it would not be right to limit access to it. I pointed out that those 2 points were once valid, but by NOT implementing a cap, very soon, if not already, they won't be !
    But you absolutely made the RIGHT CHOICE! DON'T DO PHARMACY. There are several threads on here now stating that, one of the best is called 'poor pharmacist career prospects what do the universities tell you?....!' I highly recommend reading this as the OP explains the current situation in pharmacy in an excellent way and is, himself, only in his 20s.

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=3930485
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    (Original post by crazy.chemist)
    Just to clarify, the RPS cannot do that, it is a representative body for pharmacists. A cap must be put in place by the government. I wrote to my MP about this and also the Minister in charge of Universities and received some guff about pharmacy being a well-paid and highly valued degree and it would not be right to limit access to it. I pointed out that those 2 points were once valid, but by NOT implementing a cap, very soon, if not already, they won't be !
    But you absolutely made the RIGHT CHOICE! DON'T DO PHARMACY. There are several threads on here now stating that, one of the best is called 'poor pharmacist career prospects what do the universities tell you?....!' I highly recommend reading this as the OP explains the current situation in pharmacy in an excellent way and is, himself, only in his 20s.

    https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=3930485
    Thanks for clarifying!

    Incredibly annoying as Pharmacists play such an important role in the delivery of health services, yet this government and previous governments have aided in the devaluation of this degree.

    Isn't the Minister for Universities Jo Johnson? The guy was an idiot in one of the Newsnight interviews and looked like he was having a TIA when he was asked an off-script question!
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    Thanks for clarifying!

    Incredibly annoying as Pharmacists play such an important role in the delivery of health services, yet this government and previous governments have aided in the devaluation of this degree.

    Isn't the Minister for Universities Jo Johnson? The guy was an idiot in one of the Newsnight interviews and looked like he was having a TIA when he was asked an off-script question!
    It wasn't him at the time. This was a couple of years ago. Greg Clark at the time .

    So what did you go into instead?
 
 
 
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