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    Hey guys. I'm applying to university next September and I thought I had made up my mind about studying computer science but now I'm not too sure. This isn't a subject that I did at GCSE or an dong at A-Level. I wanted to do it for A-Level but there was timetabling problems; it was either that or ICT and I chose ICT as it was a subject I knew I was good at. Afterward I decided I wanted to study computer science at university but it was already too late. Now I'm not sure if it is something I can do; I have no experience in computer science so I'm scared I wont get into any universities when there are people who do. And this will be a new subject area for me, so I don't want to regret it. ICT however, I know I can do. I will probably have a much easier time getting into a ICT course then I will a computer science course. It's kind of a safe area because I know that I'm good at it. I don't know what to do. I cant apply to both ad my personal statement will be very different. Any advice guys? All will be appreciated.
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    Whilst Computer Science is the superior A Level (in my opinion), because it much furthers your understanding into the actual working of the computer.

    However having said that, it's highly subjective. Funnily enough, you don't really need Computer Science A Level to do a degree in it. IT may suffice as sufficient Computer A Level. Additionally, most Unis for CompSci only really want Maths (or maybe Physics). The one's I've checked at least. I know people who did Maths and the 3 sciences and still got in to Russell Group institutions for CompSci.

    To counteract this, there is a simpler alternative.
    To prove that you actually can display sufficient experience of Computer exposure, I'd suggest learning some Programming Languages over the Summer. Java, C/C++, JavaScript/HTML/PHP, SQL, Python, etc. One of the more prominent programming languages (that, odds are, you will be doing in your degree course anyway), this will show the interviewer that despite not taking CompSci A Level, you still display a similar level of composure and skill in computers than someone who did it.

    In terms of choosing between IT and CompSci, these degree level jobs change, (though not immensely), CompSci appears to be the preferred route for those who want to go into the Programmer/Software Engineer/Development route. Or a Computer Engineer. Wheras IT may be geared towards Consultants, Technicians, Database Administrators, etc, do some research into the type of Computer related job you want to enter.
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    (Original post by yaspaksoy)
    Hey guys. I'm applying to university next September and I thought I had made up my mind about studying computer science but now I'm not too sure. This isn't a subject that I did at GCSE or an dong at A-Level. I wanted to do it for A-Level but there was timetabling problems; it was either that or ICT and I chose ICT as it was a subject I knew I was good at. Afterward I decided I wanted to study computer science at university but it was already too late. Now I'm not sure if it is something I can do; I have no experience in computer science so I'm scared I wont get into any universities when there are people who do. And this will be a new subject area for me, so I don't want to regret it. ICT however, I know I can do. I will probably have a much easier time getting into a ICT course then I will a computer science course. It's kind of a safe area because I know that I'm good at it. I don't know what to do. I cant apply to both ad my personal statement will be very different. Any advice guys? All will be appreciated.
    Hello

    If I am honest, you will get more out of CS than ICT and CS will open more doors for you. You will also have a deeper understanding of computing with a CS degree generally.

    Something I will also point out is that at undergrad, many of the CS, SE, CE and ICT students normally have the same modules at 1st year in uni. You'll be in the same classes in your 1st year no matter what you pick. At that stage, you can elect to switch tracks with minimal fuss.

    Most CS degrees presume no previous knowledge (obviously if you have some though that'll help you out) and start from scratch, so I wouldn't worry about that at all.
 
 
 
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