Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    https://oxfordpat.wordpress.com/oxfo...6-question-13/ surely resistance increases with temperature?
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by alvan15)
    https://oxfordpat.wordpress.com/oxfo...6-question-13/ surely resistance increases with temperature?
    Yes, you are correct. But be careful with the terminology.

    The word 'ideal' is another way of saying a resistance follows Ohms law without needing to invoke thermal considerations or any other parameter which would cause a deviation form Ohms law such as inductance, capacitance etc.

    EDIT: For an ideal conductor, there is no resistance and hence no energy losses.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Yes, you are correct. But be careful with the terminology.

    The word 'ideal' is another way of saying the conductor follows Ohms law without needing to invoke thermal considerations or any other parameter which would cause a deviation form Ohms law such as inductance, capacitance etc.
    thank you , that explains it perfectly
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alvan15)
    https://oxfordpat.wordpress.com/oxfo...6-question-13/ surely resistance increases with temperature?
    Ideal wires have zero resistance. That's why they're ideal, lol.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    Ideal wires have zero resistance. That's why they're ideal, lol.
    thanks :P
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Yes, you are correct. But be careful with the terminology.

    The word 'ideal' is another way of saying the conductor follows Ohms law without needing to invoke thermal considerations or any other parameter which would cause a deviation form Ohms law such as inductance, capacitance etc.
    It has virtually no resistance to begin with, it's not like there's a significant resistance that's maintained despite the temperature increase.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by alvan15)
    thank you , that explains it perfectly
    Following on from Physics Enemy, yes, that does imply that an 'ideal resistance' follows Ohms law perfectly and an 'ideal conductor' is perfect with no resistance and hence no energy losses. For calculation purposes it can therefore be ignored.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    They're testing whether you can suss out what makes a wire, or any component, ideal. You have to consider its purpose. We want a wire to conduct optimally.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.