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    Or does this depend on the course and university?
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    (Original post by honour)
    Or does this depend on the course and university?
    Recruitment officer? That sounds more like an outreach position to encourage people to apply.

    Admissions are handled by admissions staff, working with the academic departments responsible for each course.

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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    Recruitment officer? That sounds more like an outreach position to encourage people to apply.

    Admissions are handled by admissions staff, working with the academic departments responsible for each course.

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    So these admissions staff don't have to be a lecturers?
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    (Original post by honour)
    So these admissions staff don't have to be a lecturers?
    They work with the academics too. And some may also be academics.

    Why?


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    (Original post by Doonesbury)
    They work with the academics too. And some may also be academics.

    Why?


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    I'd previously thought that all admission staff were academics in the subject you're applying for, but when I visited Sussex and Bath, they had one or two recruitment people who specifically deal with applications. They seemed pretty knowledgeable in every subject. The recruitment person at Bath said his job is to make the job of the admission tutor easier, and he would liaise with an academic if he's in doubt whether to make an offer or not e.g. someone's predicted grades are out but their PS is excellent. It's not a big deal really, I was just surprised because I didn't know this before.
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    (Original post by honour)
    I'd previously thought that all admission staff were academics in the subject you're applying for, but when I visited Sussex and Bath, they had one or two recruitment people who specifically deal with applications. They seemed pretty knowledgeable in every subject. The recruitment person at Bath said his job is to make the job of the admission tutor easier, and he would liaise with an academic if he's in doubt whether to make an offer or not e.g. someone's predicted grades are out but their PS is excellent. It's not a big deal really, I was just surprised because I didn't know this before.
    In most cases for most courses the offer/reject decision is pretty straight forward...

    i.e. does applicant meet entry requirements:
    * has correct subjects if the course specifies any
    * has predicted grades at or close to required target
    * meets any minimum GCSE requirements
    * has a PS that shows some interest in the course
    * has a reference that supports the applicant (almost always this is the case)
    = offer

    It's only the more marginal cases (unfamiliar qualifications or small misses in the requirements) that more experienced and/or department academics need to get involved.

    Obviously this is a generalisation and some courses/universities are much more selective.

    But there's a LOT of admin involved in processing applications and that's the time-consuming thing. It wouldn't be a good use of an academic's time to get them too involved in the day-to-day process.

    Edit: just awaiting PQ or returnmigrant to correct me
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    (Original post by honour)
    So these admissions staff don't have to be a lecturers?
    The days of tutors sitting in their cozy study pondering individual applications are long gone.

    As Doonesbury has told you, admissions staff are knowledgeable people - many have Masters and PhDs but have chosen a career in this area rather than actually teaching. They process applications with an understanding of the needs of the course and what that dept wishes to see in its students. Much of the processing is automated - checking qualifications against stated requirements for instance. Reading Personal Statements is a skilled job - it wont be done by clerical staff but people trained/skilled in this area and working against a specific check-list for that course or subject devised in conjunction with the dept/school concerned.

    Balancing the numbers of offers agaisnt places is also a skilled job and all Uni have staff that deal with exactly this sort of number crunching. Again, its now not a job for a few stray academics with a spare afternoon. All of this 'centralisation' has been driven by the vast numbers of applications - and the need to be fair and transparent, and accountable.

    Unis without 'centralised admissions' are now becoming a thing of the past. Only very small Unis or specialised places like Art or Music Schools will still be making departmental admissions decisions. This is why when you go to Open Days you speak to academics about the course content - but Admissions staff about the practical stuff like grade requirements and 'what we look for in a PS'.

    Sorry if this destroys your vision of 'Admissions' - but the centralised system is far more efficient and more practical then letting 'academics' do it in their non-existent spare-time.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    The days of tutors sitting in their cozy study pondering individual applications are long gone.

    As Doonesbury has told you, admissions staff are knowledgeable people - many have Masters and PhDs but have chosen a career in this area rather than actually teaching. They process applications with an understanding of the needs of the course and what that dept wishes to see in its students. Much of the processing is automated - checking qualifications against stated requirements for instance. Reading Personal Statements is a skilled job - it wont be done by clerical staff but people trained/skilled in this area and working against a specific check-list for that course or subject devised in conjunction with the dept/school concerned.

    Balancing the numbers of offers agaisnt places is also a skilled job and all Uni have staff that deal with exactly this sort of number crunching. Again, its now not a job for a few stray academics with a spare afternoon. All of this 'centralisation' has been driven by the vast numbers of applications - and the need to be fair and transparent, and accountable.

    Unis without 'centralised admissions' are now becoming a thing of the past. Only very small Unis or specialised places like Art or Music Schools will still be making departmental admissions decisions. This is why when you go to Open Days you speak to academics about the course content - but Admissions staff about the practical stuff like grade requirements and 'what we look for in a PS'.

    Sorry if this destroys your vision of 'Admissions' - but the centralised system is far more efficient and more practical then letting 'academics' do it in their non-existent spare-time.
    Thanks for explaining.
 
 
 
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