PhD: What funding is available and what are the next steps for doing a PhD? Watch

AnEvolvedApe
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
I have just graduated in Music Technology and am considering my options very carefully (since finding a job is significantly hard at my end).

What are the next steps to doing a PhD and what funding is available?
0
reply
The_Lonely_Goatherd
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
You'd probably need to do a Masters and then a PhD. I'm not sure if there are PhDs in music technology - the closest field I can think of is electroacoustic composition.

There's very little funding, so it's extremely competitive! I think most places don't have Masters funding (Oxbridge being the exception to that rule). Funding for a PhD in the arts and humanities is done via consortiums of unis (unis grouping together, then having a lump sum of funding split between them). So you'd have to apply to a PhD programme, get accepted, be considered for funding against applicants not just from that uni, but all the other unis in the consortium. It's tough going :sadnod:

It's also worth noting that doing a PhD in whatever field you choose is not going to necessarily make you any more employable. In fact, it could have the opposite effect! :eek:
0
reply
QHF
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
I'll second TLG's remarks. Getting funding for a PhD is hard. As a rough example, and I don't know how representative this is, I was told that in my cohort 2 out of 28 successful applicants to my department got funding. And that was the successful applicants, i.e. the 26 people who didn't get funding were still 'successful' in the sense that they were offered PhD places, and there was a group beyond them who weren't even offered places. Most (in fact, I suspect all) of these people had already done at least one master's course (and sometimes more than one), and in most cases they had paid for those master's courses themselves.

I'm not saying this to discourage you. If you are inspired by study and research, and you're lucky, postgraduate work can be very fulfilling and rewarding. But don't go into it as a way to avoid the job market: the competition for funding for postgraduate study is just as grim as the competition for jobs in many fields.

If you'd like to pursue postgraduate study, I would say your best source of advice will be the people who taught you when you were an undergraduate. You will, in any case, need them to write references for your postgraduate applications. So get in touch with them and ask what postgraduate study looks like in the discipline of music technology. (My suspicion is that it will look more practice-led than postgraduate work in many disciplines, but I wouldn't know.)

Rather than the centralised UCAS system used for undergraduate applications, applications for postgraduate study are organised individually by each university, so you will need to identify particular institutions and courses you would like to apply to, and then put in separate applications to each. In many disciplines, a round of applications for postgraduate study happens around Christmas and the later parts of winter. Many institutions continue taking postgraduate applications later in the year but at that point the major competitions for research council funding are over, so the only sources of funding are specific projects. I don't know whether this model holds for music technology. Good luck!
0
reply
returnmigrant
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
PhD in Music Technology?

Practically unheard of and certainly not by someone who is just finishing an undergrad degree. What would you 'research'? You have no experience in this area beyond 3 years of undergrad.

And honestly - what is the point of a Masters in this area? It wont make you any more employable. You will still be a fresh graduate with no relevant work experience.

You have just discovered the problem of doing a vocational degree in a niche area - interesting but not that useful. Look for a job - any job, not necessarily relevant to your degree - or apply for internships - and start to build your work experience. If you have talent/ability and are tenacious enough, the opportunities will be there, but it will be hard and there are no fancy shortcuts in this sort of career.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Tue, 3 Mar '20
  • University of Bradford
    Postgraduate Open day/Evening Postgraduate
    Tue, 3 Mar '20
  • Queen's University Belfast
    Postgraduate LIVE Masters & PhD Study Fair Postgraduate
    Wed, 4 Mar '20

Do you get study leave?

Yes- I like it (506)
59.67%
Yes- I don't like it (43)
5.07%
No- I want it (241)
28.42%
No- I don't want it (58)
6.84%

Watched Threads

View All