Is it possible too many people will end up taking STEM Subjects?

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username2899906
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I'm just wondering as my school has a strong focus on all subjects including the performing arts as well as sciences, but I would like to know what it is like in other places in the country. Is too much pressure being put on people to take STEM subjects?
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luckystars
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No, there will be a shortage of STEM graduates for probably another 10-20 years. It'll be worsened by Brexit.
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Moonstruck16
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A lot of people study STEM subjects because they believe that if they don't they'll have no worth in the world. Then it gets to a few years down the line and they realise they don't actually give a damn about STEM subjects and walk away forever. One of my friends got a degree in chemistry and is now studying to become a lawyer.

So no, probably not.

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Bernadette04
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Within 5 years with the Tory government in England having cut off funding for the arts, brainwashed kids into believing it's only STEM subjects that count, we will have a dire shortage of creative people who can think outside the box, and don't believe everything the Daily Mail tells them.

I believe it is a key time currently not to believe in STEM subjects at all costs. We are missing creative people already, and gearing up to a world of obedient automaton workers who think zero hours contracts are the norm.

I pro actively encourage those who wish to study the arts and humanities, as very soon we will be crying out for them to colour our world.
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Physics Enemy
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(Original post by Moonstruck16)
A lot of people study STEM subjects because they believe that if they don't they'll have no worth in the world. Then it gets to a few years down the line and they realise they don't actually give a damn about STEM subjects and walk away forever. One of my friends got a degree in chemistry and is now studying to become a lawyer.

So no, probably not.

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The 'big 3' degrees with actual job routes are medicine, law, engineering. No generic grad scheme cares if you choose chem or economics etc.

And there's nothing 'impressive' about STEM if you're bad at arts subjects, aspie, dull, etc.
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Jack22031994
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Potentially yes but not for another 10 years or so.

Plus, unlike what some might like you to think, STEM subjects are not the only degrees/subjects worth doing.

Society needs creative thinkers, artists, academics in other fields, and not just yes men, who'll do what a robot says, which alot of the STEM people I've met are.
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Moonstruck16
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(Original post by Physics Enemy)
The 'big 3' degrees with actual job routes are medicine, law, engineering. No generic grad scheme cares if it's chem or economics etc.

There's nothing impressive about STEM if you're bad at arts subjects, aspie, dull etc.
Yeah. Plus most people who rant about STEM subjects being superior don't actually study medicine, engineering etc.

Ah to be young and naïve...

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black1blade
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(Original post by Bernadette04)
Within 5 years with the Tory government in England having cut off funding for the arts, brainwashed kids into believing it's only STEM subjects that count, we will have a dire shortage of creative people who can think outside the box, and don't believe everything the Daily Mail tells them.

I believe it is a key time currently not to believe in STEM subjects at all costs. We are missing creative people already, and gearing up to a world of obedient automaton workers who think zero hours contracts are the norm.

I pro actively encourage those who wish to study the arts and humanities, as very soon we will be crying out for them to colour our world.
You don't need to do arts subjects at school to do artistic and creative things. In fact plenty of people who do stem subjects are also very creative and free thinking. Creativity and free thinking is required to some extent to take many stem subjects to a higher level. I don't think art and humanities subjects fit as snugly into examination systems as stem subjects which have more objective answers and facts.
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Jack22031994
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(Original post by Moonstruck16)
Yeah. Plus most people who rant about STEM subjects being superior don't actually study medicine, engineering etc.


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Normally the ones (ive found) who do are Biomed or something like that
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black1blade
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Although yeah I do agree that if people don't have a passion in the subjects they are taking then there's really no point. I mean sometimes it's good to grin and bear one subject you don't like too much if it would be a good a-level for whatever course you want to do. Also lots of degrees only have 1 or 2 required a-levels so you can do whatever interests you with other choices.
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spidle
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As luckystars said, we have a shortage of STEM graduates and this will only hurt the country as we may lack in innovation/technological advancement.
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Physics Enemy
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(Original post by black1blade)
You don't need to do arts subjects at school to do artistic and creative things. In fact plenty of people who do stem subjects are also very creative and free thinking. Creativity and free thinking is required to some extent to take many stem subjects to a higher level. I don't think art and humanities subjects fit as snugly into examination systems as stem subjects which have more objective answers and facts.
Maths can be quite creative at times (in a different way to arts) but the sciences (inc physics) are anything but. Dry and robotic.

I don't know many STEM types who are well rounded as you describe. They're normally the stereotype. Very few who do oxbridge maths, physics, etc did a variety.

Thatcher did Chem at Ox, but I'm struggling to think of big public figures who were/are the STEM type. They're mostly anonymous.
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bloated_utopia
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people should do what makes them happy, satisfied and productive people. what ever that may be. for some it's stem based, for others is arts based, or even somewhere in between. the issue could turn out to be less of an issue of too many people doing stem subjects but to many yes-men and stem or art exclusive individuals. society is quickly demanding people who have a broad skill set and are open to working outside their educational pigeon-hole. the education system really needs to reform to this emerging reality.
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black1blade
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(Original post by Physics Enemy)
Maths can be quite creative at times (in a different way to arts) but the sciences (inc physics) are anything but. Dry and robotic.

I don't know many STEM types who are well rounded as you detailed. They are normally the stereotype. Very few who do oxbridge maths, physics, etc do a variety before.

Thatcher did Chem at Ox, but I'm struggling to think of big public figures who was/is the STEM type. They're mostly anonymous.
Yeah I guess the scientific method is by nature intentionally divorced from human creativity to an extent. Also yeah I haven't got into seriously producing anything creative yet (well I guess wanting to play bass isn't totally creative) but I am really interested in lots of different artistic media on a fairly analytical level. I find things from pretty much every subject interesting on some level, I just prefer engaging in academia with maths and physical science.
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HabibSyed
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(Original post by Bernadette04)
Within 5 years with the Tory government in England having cut off funding for the arts, brainwashed kids into believing it's only STEM subjects that count, we will have a dire shortage of creative people who can think outside the box, and don't believe everything the Daily Mail tells them.

I believe it is a key time currently not to believe in STEM subjects at all costs. We are missing creative people already, and gearing up to a world of obedient automaton workers who think zero hours contracts are the norm.

I pro actively encourage those who wish to study the arts and humanities, as very soon we will be crying out for them to colour our world.
Heh, thats funny. Yes, we need a few artist, but they're not nessesary. We need scientist who think critically, innovatively and creatively. We need scientist to utilise their problem solving skills logically to combat diseases, creat infrastructural masterpieces, and launch humainity into the future.

You pointing a camera at a pile of horse **** and describing its inspiring effect on you is not very important.
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Moonstruck16
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(Original post by HabibSyed)
Heh, thats funny. Yes, we need a few artist, but they're not nessesary. We need scientist who think critically, innovatively and creatively. We need scientist to utilise their problem solving skills logically to combat diseases, creat infrastructural masterpieces, and launch humainity into the future.

You pointing a camera at a pile of horse **** and describing its inspiring effect on you is not very important.
There are plenty of dense science students around you realise?

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bobby147
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(Original post by spidle)
As luckystars said, we have a shortage of STEM graduates and this will only hurt the country as we may lack in innovation/technological advancement.
I am seriously skeptical of that.
I have seen people with Master's degree in maths working in Lidl and my cousin who has a biomedical degree is working in a call centre.
So what innovation/technological advancement ?
This STEM shortage crisis myth needs to stop.
A lot of people with with STEM degrees are working in jobs far removed from the subject they studied and very laborious.
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bobby147
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(Original post by Moonstruck16)
There are plenty of dense science students around you realise?

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Even in your uni course ?
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spidle
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(Original post by bobby147)
I am seriously skeptical of that.
I have seen people with Master's degree in maths working in Lidl and my cousin who has a biomedical degree is working in a call centre.
So what innovation/technological advancement ?
This STEM shortage crisis myth needs to stop.
A lot of people with with STEM degrees are working in jobs far removed from the subject they studied and very laborious.
I reckon the NHS could do with innovation, just from what I am hearing about the Charlie Gard case and similar others that need to go to America for treatment. Also those hacks that attacked the NHS a few months ago.
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bobby147
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(Original post by spidle)
I reckon the NHS could do with innovation, just from what I am hearing about the Charlie Gard case and similar others that need to go to America for treatment. Also those hacks that attacked the NHS a few months ago.
But most of the STEM graduates will ever do things like tho.
They will go into finance or accounting or teaching or civil service or something like that .
Most of them might be competent,but that does not mean the groundbreaking ideas of the future will come from them.
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