what are unis looking for in younger 'mature' students? Watch

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vincent gallo
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Ie, those in their early 20s. Is it enough simply to meet/surpass the entry requirements?
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Mark_KK
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(Original post by vincent gallo)
Ie, those in their early 20s. Is it enough simply to meet/surpass the entry requirements?
When I was 22 I made the decision to take 2 A-levels in a year.

Both Hull and Lancaster made me an offer based on this to study Law.

They said that my life experience more then compensated for lack of a third A-level.

Lancaster made me "A,B" and Hull "B,C". Normal offers are "A,A,B" and "B,B,B," respecitvley.
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vincent gallo
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Would A Levels taken at 18 suffice?
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vincent gallo
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(Original post by Mark_KK)
They said that my life experience more then compensated for lack of a third A-level.
Would that be true of all mature applicants though? Or is some people's experience of life more valuable?
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Mark_KK
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(Original post by vincent gallo)
Would that be true of all mature applicants though? Or is some people's experience of life more valuable?
Depends where you want to apply, what course you want to apply for and what life experience you have.

Personally I had been in employment for three years, nearly two of which were with the same company in a reasonably responsible job.

If you are in your late teens or early twenties and have spent the last few years either job hopping or doing very little then they may not be so keen on you.

Best way to find out how they would react to your application is to telephone the admissions tutors at the places where you are interested.
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vincent gallo
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(Original post by Mark_KK)
Best way to find out how they would react to your application is to telephone the admissions tutors at the places where you are interested.
How many uni's did you approach? Were they all helpful?
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vincent gallo
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*bump*
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nikk
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(Original post by Mark_KK)
Depends where you want to apply, what course you want to apply for and what life experience you have.

Personally I had been in employment for three years, nearly two of which were with the same company in a reasonably responsible job.

If you are in your late teens or early twenties and have spent the last few years either job hopping or doing very little then they may not be so keen on you.

Best way to find out how they would react to your application is to telephone the admissions tutors at the places where you are interested.
Hey Mark_KK! Sounds like we are doing similar things; I have been working for the past years too and am now going to university in a weeks time. What course are you doing? Is it the course related to your work experience? Mine isn't!! lol
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vincent gallo
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(Original post by NikNak)
Hey Mark_KK! Sounds like we are doing similar things; I have been working for the past years too and am now going to university in a weeks time. What course are you doing? Is it the course related to your work experience? Mine isn't!! lol
He said he had applied for Law courses.
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AT82
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I am not sure if my course it typical but those in their early 20's like me always seem to get the higher marks. I think it is because they tend to be more mature but still quite fresh to exam/revision techniques. The older mature students (35+) tend to always turn up for lectures but not really understand anything and fail. The 18-21 year olds are some times quite imature and would ratrher spend their degree finding the new found joy of a night club. Those in their early 20's have probably already experienced all that so it won't be such a novelty to them.
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vincent gallo
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
I am not sure if my course it typical but those in their early 20's like me always seem to get the higher marks. I think it is because they tend to be more mature but still quite fresh to exam/revision techniques. The older mature students (35+) tend to always turn up for lectures but not really understand anything and fail. The 18-21 year olds are some times quite imature and would ratrher spend their degree finding the new found joy of a night club. Those in their early 20's have probably already experienced all that so it won't be such a novelty to them.
Perhaps older students (35+) have more responsibilities etc to distract them? I think people in their early twenties can sometimes appreciate education abit more than students who are a couple of years younger.
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Catswhiskers
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I also think that you're more likely to be doing a course that you really want to do / that you know will help you with a career. I don't mean to make sweeping generalisations about everyone, but I know that at 18 I felt like I had been 'brainwashed' by my school into taking a certain degree at a certain university and following a certain career path - and that was one of the reasons that I didn't apply to university straight from school, because I knew that I didn't want to do what they wanted me to! Working for a few years has allowed me to really think about what I want to do, and why, and I know that now I really want to be at university.
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vincent gallo
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(Original post by Catswhiskers)
I also think that you're more likely to be doing a course that you really want to do / that you know will help you with a career.
I agree. Are you applying this year?
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Catswhiskers
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I applied 'last' year (if you know what I mean) and I'm starting university in two weeks - cue huge nerves and major panic!
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vincent gallo
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(Original post by Catswhiskers)
I applied 'last' year (if you know what I mean) and I'm starting university in two weeks - cue huge nerves and major panic!
Im sure youll have a fantastic time! Are you moving to a new town? Did you take any courses last year? Sorry for all the questions
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Catswhiskers
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No probs about the questions ! I'm moving to London (from 'the North'!) and no, I didn't take any courses last year. I've been working for a few years and last year finally made up my mind to apply to university.
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vincent gallo
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Oh quite a major relocation then! Did you go back to your old school to get your reference? Or just ask your boss? Ive been considering taking a couple of A Levels this year but Im not sure whether it would really be necessary. Ill have to contact a few admissions tutors I suppose.
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Catswhiskers
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It took me ages to get a reference. In fact that was the thing that I had the most trouble with! I didn't really think that it was a good idea for me to go back to my old college for a reference - what could someone who taught me for one afternoon a week a few years ago have to say that would help me!?!? I also couldn't ask my boss, as I've been working in the family business and my boss is my mum (oh, isn't nepotism a wonderful thing!) Eventually I got help from our business mentor who wrote me a lovely reference - nice man!

I suppose whether or not you choose to do more A-levels really depends on your course, and what you've been doing. I'm studying a social science, so I felt that I would be ok. Not that I'm saying social sciences are 'easy', I just imagine that maths/science courses would be more likely to want recent study of those A-Levels, because the courses generally progress from that level - but I think that it really depends on what and where you're studying, and what your experiences have been. I also couldn't face the thought of commuting to our local college for a year to do a full-time Access Course (which they weren't keen on me doing anyway, because I already have GCSE's/A-Levels - and was 'too young'!) I think that you just have to approach the universities to see how they feel.
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vincent gallo
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Its not long since I was last in full time education so hopefully I wont need to take A Levels this year. I got ABB at school so I could only really improve my marks by a couple of grades.

Did you approach many admissions tutors? Were they generally helpful?
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Catswhiskers
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I din't really approach that many admissions tutors as the course I want to do is quite specialised and isn't offered in that many places. I think that I spoke to about three or four places in total - the tutors were generally helpful but they tend to be quite cautious until they know fully what you intend to do, what you have been doing and what grades you gained originally. It's useful to talk to them though, as the support for 'younger' mature students (accomodation/study skills etc) tends to differ hugely at different places. All in all though, the places that I spoke to were quite helpful.
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