Sixth Form Revision: Watch

username3112590
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I'm taking maths, biology, chemistry and want to do medicine but my GCSE'S are most likely going to be average, thus, I am currently revising in the summer and want I'm doing AQA for all three A-levels.
So does anyone have any tips on how to do well in these subjects, is note taking good (didn't help me in my GCSES) or making flashcards along the way and Im aiming for A/A*.
Also, does anyone have any revision resources they have for these subjects they could kindly share.
Any responses are appreciated
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ashaxo99
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how well you do in a levels is all down to the way you revise, and you can easily get an A or A* if you work hard

note-taking may not have helped at GCSEs but that's all dependent on the way you were applying your notes. a good idea with your sciences would be to make notes and learn them off by heart, after you've made sure you fully understand the content of them. then, what you want to do is go onto the AQA website and do past papers and look at the markschemes, and anything which is on the markschemes that you haven't got on your notes, add to them. I also strongly recommend typing up your notes at A-level, if you're able to work like that, because it makes it a lot easier and organised (although you can still do this with written notes, but I just feel as if they're too time-consuming)

also with maths, what you'll want to do to improve is do all your textbook questions and then go on to do past papers, tons and tons of past papers. I don't know if they're changing the spec for next year or not, but a lot of the questions up until this point have always been so similar each year, that if you truly learn how to understand the underlying mathematical concepts through all the questions you do, you'll be able to do any question. the only way to get better at maths and ensure you do well is to practise practise practise! physicsandmathstutor is a great website with a ton of maths past papers and help, and if you're ever unsure of anything, there's a ton of videos on YouTube you can use to help you

good luck and know that all the hard work you put in at a levels definitely pays off!
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Blue_Cow
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No point in revising for your A-Levels in the summer - You will burn out. Your time is better spent working in a care home/care environment to build up work experience for your personal statement.

I just took notes from the revision guides and did past papers. If note taking didn't help you at GCSE then find another approach (you mentioned flash cards)

EDIT:

I second that ashaxo99 said about maths - The only way to get good at it is to do every past paper, every Gold paper and every Solomon paper.
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S.G.
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(Original post by GCSE 9)
I'm taking maths, biology, chemistry and want to do medicine but my GCSE'S are most likely going to be average, thus, I am currently revising in the summer and want I'm doing AQA for all three A-levels.
So does anyone have any tips on how to do well in these subjects, is note taking good (didn't help me in my GCSES) or making flashcards along the way and Im aiming for A/A*.
Also, does anyone have any revision resources they have for these subjects they could kindly share.
Any responses are appreciated
I did bio, Chen, maths and fm.

Definitely have to take good concise notes for biology and chemistry. The textbooks are over 700 pages long and you don't want that stress of learning detailed pages.

What I did was I used the textbook, specification and CGP guide to make bullet point notes on every topic. This made it much easier to remember stuff and I suggest you do this.

For chemistry, flash cards will be useful for learning things like reaction conditions, definitions, etc. They are especially useful for organic chemistry. Also make notes as again there is some theory. With hindsight, the best thing to do with chemistry is practice questions as some of the questions do get repetitive even with the new spec papers.

For maths and fm, I made notes in class but there's hardly any theory. Hence questions are the best way to prepare.

Good luck mate.
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thotproduct
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I swear this counts as a sort of mental self-harm.

Can I just say, if you're that sure your GCSEs are gonna be average, and you DON'T KNOW what you're gonna get, why are you revising for A Levels and a 6th Form that you don't even know you've gotten in yet, without factoring in the results or other variables. I took Further Maths, Maths, Physics, Chem, CompSci for next year, however, asides from doing the transition homework they assign you, and taking a brief look at their syllabus online, I'm not going to be revising until I know FOR SURE that I've made it to the 6th Form and I've CONFIRMED my subjects.
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username3112590
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(Original post by ashaxo99)
how well you do in a levels is all down to the way you revise, and you can easily get an A or A* if you work hard

note-taking may not have helped at GCSEs but that's all dependent on the way you were applying your notes. a good idea with your sciences would be to make notes and learn them off by heart, after you've made sure you fully understand the content of them. then, what you want to do is go onto the AQA website and do past papers and look at the markschemes, and anything which is on the markschemes that you haven't got on your notes, add to them. I also strongly recommend typing up your notes at A-level, if you're able to work like that, because it makes it a lot easier and organised (although you can still do this with written notes, but I just feel as if they're too time-consuming)

also with maths, what you'll want to do to improve is do all your textbook questions and then go on to do past papers, tons and tons of past papers. I don't know if they're changing the spec for next year or not, but a lot of the questions up until this point have always been so similar each year, that if you truly learn how to understand the underlying mathematical concepts through all the questions you do, you'll be able to do any question. the only way to get better at maths and ensure you do well is to practise practise practise! physicsandmathstutor is a great website with a ton of maths past papers and help, and if you're ever unsure of anything, there's a ton of videos on YouTube you can use to help you

good luck and know that all the hard work you put in at a levels definitely pays off!
Thanks and can I ask how hard is it really to get all A/A* at sixth form if your GCSE'S are average (I've predicted 2A* 4A 3B) , as if for instance you get all A*'s at GCSE'S then it's easier to get all A/A* at A-levels. or does it really depend on how hard you work in sixth form as I'm willing to study everyday for the full two years. But is it near to impossible because of my GCSES
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username3112590
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(Original post by AryanGh)
I swear this counts as a sort of mental self-harm.

Can I just say, if you're that sure your GCSEs are gonna be average, and you DON'T KNOW what you're gonna get, why are you revising for A Levels and a 6th Form that you don't even know you've gotten in yet, without factoring in the results or other variables. I took Further Maths, Maths, Physics, Chem, CompSci for next year, however, asides from doing the transition homework they assign you, and taking a brief look at their syllabus online, I'm not going to be revising until I know FOR SURE that I've made it to the 6th Form and I've CONFIRMED my subjects.
I do understand you but I have a month and I feel like if i start revising now I will get into an habit of it. As for GCSE'S I literally revised a day before exams (not very smart I know) but I hated revision, thus, even if I don't get in I would be prepared for the amount of revision to come.
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username3112590
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(Original post by SGHD26716)
I did bio, Chen, maths and fm.

Definitely have to take good concise notes for biology and chemistry. The textbooks are over 700 pages long and you don't want that stress of learning detailed pages.

What I did was I used the textbook, specification and CGP guide to make bullet point notes on every topic. This made it much easier to remember stuff and I suggest you do this.

For chemistry, flash cards will be useful for learning things like reaction conditions, definitions, etc. They are especially useful for organic chemistry. Also make notes as again there is some theory. With hindsight, the best thing to do with chemistry is practice questions as some of the questions do get repetitive even with the new spec papers.

For maths and fm, I made notes in class but there's hardly any theory. Hence questions are the best way to prepare.

Good luck mate.
What I don't understand with note taking is that how can you learn all of those notes before an exam (i know someone who had to learn 180 pages for biology alone) and mainly because it's condensed the important information may have been missed out, so I'm confused
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The RAR
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Honestly if you want As and A*s at A-level you need to have an objective of what you want to do in the future, what job do you want to do? GCSEs were like a beating in your back to prepare you for the real stuff like A-levels and work experience.
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S.G.
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(Original post by GCSE 9)
What I don't understand with note taking is that how can you learn all of those notes before an exam (i know someone who had to learn 180 pages for biology alone) and mainly because it's condensed the important information may have been missed out, so I'm confused
The textbook has a lot of unnecessary details. Also, I don't write my notes are prose. It's bullet points under headings. The bullet points effectively are markscheme points.

Also the activity of writing stuff down for me helped me remember stuff rather than just reading. Writing it down in my own words also helped me question stuff so I know what's going on.
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username3112590
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(Original post by The RAR)
Honestly if you want As and A*s at A-level you need to have an objective of what you want to do in the future, what job do you want to do? GCSEs were like a beating in your back to prepare you for the real stuff like A-levels and work experience.
Hopefully a doctor :dontknow:
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nextgenmedic
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Split up your summer

Each day maybe note take like 3 sub topics in a topic, e.g. for me thats like up to 12 pages in a chem a level text book

At the end of that day try to learn or at least glance over what you've noted

As each day progresses glance over the notes you wrote from day 1 up until the notes on the current day

Then when you come to revise proprly everything'll look familiar and you'll commit to memory easier!
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