sammagnus2016
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I'm really interested in taking Classics at uni and I know that this includes, more often than not, learning Latin and Greek. I took GCSE Latin, and it didn't go too well, but having spoken to my teacher about it, he's told me that there is a very valid reason, partly that we had a change of teacher half way through, and partly because I ended up on crutches and wasn't able to get work for a significant portion of a term.

I'd love some advice from someone as I'm obviously slightly concerned that maybe Classics isn't going to be the best choice for me or unis won't accept me because of this.
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artful_lounger
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It's not uncommon for Classics courses to have pathways for students who have not taken the relevant language(s) to A-level standard - typically in the form of an extended course, e.g. the 4/5 year courses at Oxford and Cambridge. If classical civilisation is generally of interest to you, there are many courses in Classical Studies/Classical Civilisation/Ancient History/Classical Archaeology which focus on this area of study (from various viewpoints), which don't necessarily require language study.

Often the former courses prefer if you have some linguistic background, e.g. an A-level in a modern language, although this isn't necessarily required. The latter courses usually don't require any specific background however. However generally, classical languages are challenging languages to learn, so if you haven't been successful in language learning so far (either classical or modern) you may struggle with this at university - however as above, this would just indicate the latter style of courses would be more appropriate, allowing you to explore your interest without the language element.
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sek510i
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I studied Classics. I think that almost all UK universities need you to have an A Level in Latin or Ancient Greek before starting, unless you do what the Artful Lounger suggested and do an extended course.

Classics and Classical Civilisation classes are usually mixed, so if you do a Class Civ degree you could probably do Latin and Greek from scratch as part of that. Is it languages specifically that you're interested in?
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jkls92
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
It's not uncommon for Classics courses to have pathways for students who have not taken the relevant language(s) to A-level standard - typically in the form of an extended course, e.g. the 4/5 year courses at Oxford and Cambridge. If classical civilisation is generally of interest to you, there are many courses in Classical Studies/Classical Civilisation/Ancient History/Classical Archaeology which focus on this area of study (from various viewpoints), which don't necessarily require language study.

Often the former courses prefer if you have some linguistic background, e.g. an A-level in a modern language, although this isn't necessarily required. The latter courses usually don't require any specific background however. However generally, classical languages are challenging languages to learn, so if you haven't been successful in language learning so far (either classical or modern) you may struggle with this at university - however as above, this would just indicate the latter style of courses would be more appropriate, allowing you to explore your interest without the language element.
I suggest going for the proper language course, unless you feel you are totally unable to succeed. Learning the two won't be easy, but it's part of the game and you'll get a lot of satisfaction out of it. The proper way to understand a civilisation is to study its literature, not dig temples.
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DuskDragon
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(Original post by sammagnus2016)
I'm really interested in taking Classics at uni and I know that this includes, more often than not, learning Latin and Greek. I took GCSE Latin, and it didn't go too well, but having spoken to my teacher about it, he's told me that there is a very valid reason, partly that we had a change of teacher half way through, and partly because I ended up on crutches and wasn't able to get work for a significant portion of a term.

I'd love some advice from someone as I'm obviously slightly concerned that maybe Classics isn't going to be the best choice for me or unis won't accept me because of this.
Hello there! Ultimately, as for all courses if classics is really something that interests you and you can't imagine doing anything else then go for it!
As far as I'm aware, there are a lot of classic related courses. I'm not sure what year you're in right now, but there's a course of Oxford where you don't need either Latin or Greek a-level to do a classics course, so you can definitely consider that- on the other hand Oxford does look quite heavily at GCSEs.
Best of luck!
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sammagnus2016
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Is it 100% necessary to take Latin or Greek A Level? That would be slightly unfair surely given some places, like the school I'm in at the moment, don't offer those courses.
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Lucilou101
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(Original post by sammagnus2016)
Is it 100% necessary to take Latin or Greek A Level? That would be slightly unfair surely given some places, like the school I'm in at the moment, don't offer those courses.
For some Classics courses yes. These universities then offer Classical Civilisation/Classical Literature for those candidates who don't have the A Level, which are effectively the same course but with language tuition built in.

Other universities, such as Oxford and Cambridge (and increasingly at other universities), will offer Classics to everyone and have various sub-versions with either an extra year or a slightly different format for those without an A Level.

I wouldn't get too worried about the course name; it's much more important to look at the course structures and find one that is open to you that teaches language tuition from scratch and has an appealing structure with regard to your interests in History, Literature, Philosophy, Archaeology etc
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username2423693
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Hardly any universities demand an A Level in Greek/Latin as they know so few people take it! Off the top of my head, I think Exeter, York and St Andrews require it, but the majority don't

I'm in the same boat - I haven't studied Greek or Latin in school, so I went to a summer school and started teaching myself in my spare time.

Maybe go for Class Civ degrees instead of pure Classics if you don't want languages to be the centre of your degree, but other than that it's fine.
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