what interesting research has recently taken place about the brain??

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olivia131
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what interesting research has recently taken place about the brain??
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QuentinM
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As someone who is kinda a neuroscientist now....i'll try and weigh in

1) A few months ago the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly suggested that their new treatment for Alzheimers disease had some success in slowing the progression of the disease. The treatment is a monoclonal antibody (whos name escapes me) that attaches to Amyloid Beta, one of the main proteins that build up in and around cells during Alzheimers (the other is tau, fyi)

2) This dope af scanning of the brain, done by Cardiff university and a few others (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40488545) trying to understand the ins and outs of all sorts of neurological diseases.

3) Back to amyloid and tau....two studies published relatively recently conflict over which one is more important in Alzheimers disease. A study of Jackson Brain bank samples (several hundred at least) suggests that the amount of tau correlated with how bad the symptoms were in the patient. However a study a few years before that found that tau may actually clump together to protect neurons from dying.

4) Two years a study in the Lancet (kinda a big deal journal) revealed that after studying 2 million british adults, those that were obese were less likely to get dementia, going against virtually every study done so far in that topic. Huhhhh? (it appears to be that these people eat more, hence get more nutrients and protect themselves, but this hasnt officially been confirmed yet. Eat your vegetables).

These 4 were the most interesting ones I could think of, off the top of my head. Why do you ask, anyway?
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bobby147
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(Original post by QuentinM)
As someone who is kinda a neuroscientist now....i'll try and weigh in

1) A few months ago the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly suggested that their new treatment for Alzheimers disease had some success in slowing the progression of the disease. The treatment is a monoclonal antibody (whos name escapes me) that attaches to Amyloid Beta, one of the main proteins that build up in and around cells during Alzheimers (the other is tau, fyi)

2) This dope af scanning of the brain, done by Cardiff university and a few others (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40488545) trying to understand the ins and outs of all sorts of neurological diseases.

3) Back to amyloid and tau....two studies published relatively recently conflict over which one is more important in Alzheimers disease. A study of Jackson Brain bank samples (several hundred at least) suggests that the amount of tau correlated with how bad the symptoms were in the patient. However a study a few years before that found that tau may actually clump together to protect neurons from dying.

4) Two years a study in the Lancet (kinda a big deal journal) revealed that after studying 2 million british adults, those that were obese were less likely to get dementia, going against virtually every study done so far in that topic. Huhhhh? (it appears to be that these people eat more, hence get more nutrients and protect themselves, but this hasnt officially been confirmed yet. Eat your vegetables).

These 4 were the most interesting ones I could think of, off the top of my head. Why do you ask, anyway?
For no.1,didn't that treatment flop ?
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Amefish
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olivia131 hope this helps.

New Scientist:

Science News:
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QuentinM
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(Original post by bobby147)
For no.1,didn't that treatment flop ?

Apparently it did....so much for me being in the loop
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bobby147
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1.MIT and Japanese scientists show that copies of memory is made ,simultaneously in the hippocampus and cortex
http://www.who.int/csr/disease/swine...s_20090511/en/
https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...-ago-memories/

2.Scientists capture the structure of LSD bound to its serotonin receptor 5-HT2B.Turns out,when LSD binds to this serotonin receptor,the LSD molecule gets locked in place because like a lid,part of the receptor folds over the LSD molecule.Helps explain why the effects of LSD are long lasting (up to 12 hours).
LSD is being researched for its potential to treat treatment resistant depression.Knowing more about how LSD binds to these receptors can help researchers design better drugs with fewer of the side effects of LSD.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0126132541.htm
http://www.nature.com/news/first-loo...mistry-1.21377
https://phys.org/news/2017-01-lsd-br...-receptor.html
https://www.theguardian.com/science/...study-suggests
3.This one is a bit old but it is a huge breakthrough and will have a big impact on neuroscience,since biology is a tool driven science,and this is one hell of a tool.
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...ting-the-brain
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bobby147
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Apparently it did....so much for me being in the loop
No,it's ok.Tbh,one of the problems we have with Alzheimers is our models are not that good
http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline...heimers-models
I have no idea what it will take to beat the disease.Other methods of attack such as the connection between alzheimer and glucose have also failed in trials
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-ac...-idUSKBN1671LG

I am not sure how long people are going keep accepting the amyloid hypothesis as the cause of Alzheimer's.
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bobby147
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(Original post by QuentinM)
As someone who is kinda a neuroscientist now....i'll try and weigh in

1) A few months ago the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly suggested that their new treatment for Alzheimers disease had some success in slowing the progression of the disease. The treatment is a monoclonal antibody (whos name escapes me) that attaches to Amyloid Beta, one of the main proteins that build up in and around cells during Alzheimers (the other is tau, fyi)

2) This dope af scanning of the brain, done by Cardiff university and a few others (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-40488545) trying to understand the ins and outs of all sorts of neurological diseases.

3) Back to amyloid and tau....two studies published relatively recently conflict over which one is more important in Alzheimers disease. A study of Jackson Brain bank samples (several hundred at least) suggests that the amount of tau correlated with how bad the symptoms were in the patient. However a study a few years before that found that tau may actually clump together to protect neurons from dying.

4) Two years a study in the Lancet (kinda a big deal journal) revealed that after studying 2 million british adults, those that were obese were less likely to get dementia, going against virtually every study done so far in that topic. Huhhhh? (it appears to be that these people eat more, hence get more nutrients and protect themselves, but this hasnt officially been confirmed yet. Eat your vegetables).

These 4 were the most interesting ones I could think of, off the top of my head. Why do you ask, anyway?
That is a sweet picture for the MRI scan !
Do you think it is possible tau or amyloid might not be the cause ?They could simply be the symptoms of whatever is causing it,which may explain why drugs to remove them don't work.
Or do you think they may be the cause,but we are just too late ,so the drugs have no effect ?
That Lancet journal sounds interesting,so trade off higher chance of heart disease
and stroke in return for lower risk of dementia ?
It also looks like neuro-inflammation may play a role
https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/0...ns/123428.html
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QuentinM
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(Original post by bobby147)
That is a sweet picture for the MRI scan !
Do you think it is possible tau or amyloid might not be the cause ?They could simply be the symptoms of whatever is causing it,which may explain why drugs to remove them don't work.
Or do you think they may be the cause,but we are just too late ,so the drugs have no effect ?
That Lancet journal sounds interesting,so trade off higher chance of heart disease
and stroke in return for lower risk of dementia ?
It also looks like neuro-inflammation may play a role
https://psychcentral.com/news/2017/0...ns/123428.html
Plenty of evidence out there suggesting Amyloid plaques and tau NFT's are actually protective measures to try and keep the cells alive. Which just aren't that good. The drugs we currently have, and most of the ones we are testing, are for people already with the disease progressing, with treatment aimed at trying to stop it spreading, and all treatments at the moment suck.

You would think the trade off would be between heart disease/stroke/diabetes and dementia....but its not that clear cut. Trajectory studies of weight loss/gain in elderly patients, paired to their risk of developing dementia, found those that gain weight were on the whole protected, and the more weight you lost, the higher your dementia risk. Pairing all that together, it looks like its just nutritional deficiency which is associated with that increased risk of dementia. Vitamins like Vitamin D are being suggested as the missing links there. So we could reduce the chance of both bad scenarios by taking vitamin/nutrient supplements and eating a good diet in the first place.
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olivia131
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Thank you all for your contributions !
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