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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    The government honestly believes there is a small gap between good and bad schools - how wrong they are. Just having their little 5A*-C%, stops people from achieving more than that, or above C's because the teachers believe that is all they need to achieve. It's sad when people who have not worked hard and are short of getting C's get lots of extra help to get their 5C's and yet people who have 10C's are left, when they could achieve so much more. The government needs to have an A*/A % of grades to allow the best to achieve.

    I believe people should get special consideration when it comes to universities, whether they are put off because of applying as of their GCSEs/AS/A2 and have done not so well for good reason... motivation, hard-working and potential mean so much more than grades.
    Yeh I agree with that - at my high school my parents were told by the deputy head (who was teaching my maths class at the time) that I was within the top 5 people in the year for maths and that I was basically extremaly good at it (I know I'm not being modest but I need to say what he said to get the point across). Now the next year our class got a new teacher - she was only bothered with people getting C grades (she even tried to get the whole class to sit a Intermediate paper where the top mark is a B and this was the top set! :eek: ). She refused to help people who would definetly get at least a C to obtain a higher grade and didn't even finish teching us all the material - the result was that I ended up with 2 Cs in maths (the other C being in stats) when my deputy head was thinking I should have gotten an A or even A*! :eek: Personaly I think its crinimal how she helped people who didn't want to learn (it wasn't that they just didn't have the talent) and refused help to those who did want to learn. :mad:
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    oK for the person who made the comment I might have learning difficults hence my poor spelling I kind of do, I have high frequency hearing loss (so some words don't sound the same, its not an excuse but it makes things a little bit harder to spell) a few school teachers said I had dyslexic tendencies but I never got the test done, I think I may have a very mild form of it. I do have dyspraxia but that shouldn't really affect my spelling in anyway.

    I think making everybody stay on at school until their 18 may have some benefits but in economic terms it is not practicle. I feel ashmed about my poor education in some areas but I always worked hard at school so is it me or the system that has failed?
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    (Original post by Ian88)
    Eevn though it's possible to be badly educated AND have a degree it is next to impossible to be educated without one.
    Education just means acquired knowledge, so i don’t understand how this knowledge has to be academic in order for a person to be educated :confused:
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    I think that you can get an equally good education at either a private or a state school. I come from an 'underachieving' state school (i.e. we get less than the national average of A*-C grades at GCSE) and I think that my education has been very good.

    However, I do agree that state schools can push less academic students to get Cs whilst ignoring those who are capable of getting A*s. I got 7A*s and 6As in my GCSEs this year and would agree that my results would have probably been higher if I had been given more support and had smaller class sizes like you would find at a public school.

    Despite this I cannot stand the generalisations made about state schools. I think that the opportunities offered to me have been second to none. I have acted with the RSC, being taught violin, viola, piano and trumpet to a very high standard, joined numerous orchestras and ensembles that are run jointly by our local state schools and had a thoroughly enjoyable array of other extra curricular activities. State schools aren't all geared to 'teaching pupils to pass exams' as apposed to educating them. I have a thoroughly rounded education and passed my exams through understanding what I was studying and not merely knowing how to pass the paper.

    I think that our education system would be better off in state schools if we brought back the grammar system. I know many people are opposed to it and regard it as elitist but I think that academic potential varies greatly between individuals and therefore those who are more able should be given the opportunity to flourish more.

    I also think that then teachers could focus on raising the standard of less able pupils to get them a grade C or above without making the most able students suffer as a consequence. That way everyone would get a fair education!
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    (Original post by Dajo123)
    Education just means acquired knowledge, so i don’t understand how this knowledge has to be academic in order for a person to be educated :confused:
    No education is how to survive within a society, how to make the most of oppurtunities. Schooling just helps people achieve this, but you could still be well educated but not have any qualifications.

    Education is knowledge but knowledge covers a wide area such as knowing crime dosn't pay. You can also learn knowledge from many different places.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    No education is how to survive within a society, how to make the most of oppurtunities. Schooling just helps people achieve this, but you could still be well educated but not have any qualifications.

    Education is knowledge but knowledge covers a wide area such as knowing crime dosn't pay. You can also learn knowledge from many different places.
    Yes this is how i view education, so i cant understand why some people cant seem to understand this, maybe its because they're not "educated" enough.
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    (Original post by Scottus_Mus)
    I think that our education system would be better off in state schools if we brought back the grammar system. I know many people are opposed to it and regard it as elitist but I think that academic potential varies greatly between individuals and therefore those who are more able should be given the opportunity to flourish more.

    I also think that then teachers could focus on raising the standard of less able pupils to get them a grade C or above without making the most able students suffer as a consequence. That way everyone would get a fair education!
    My sister went to one of few grammar schools that exist in this country and I think the standard of teaching was better than what I had, teachers left all the time leaving you stranded before exams etc. The problem with the comprehensive school is the idiots always spoil it. I think they should open up remand schools where people who have been expelled go. You will have to go there for 1 year and if you're behavour improves you can go back to a comprehensive school. The problem with the current system for financial reasons (i.e schools wanting money) in a lot of less popular schools people are hardly ever expelled as there will be nobody else to take their place.
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    (Original post by Ian88)
    Eevn though it's possible to be badly educated AND have a degree it is next to impossible to be educated without one.
    Nonsense. A degree is a piece of paper which states you sat and passed certain exams, it does not make the holder eduacted anymore than the lack of this piece of paper will make one 'unlearned.'
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    (Original post by Chubb)
    Yeh I agree with that - at my high school my parents were told by the deputy head (who was teaching my maths class at the time) that I was within the top 5 people in the year for maths and that I was basically extremaly good at it (I know I'm not being modest but I need to say what he said to get the point across). Now the next year our class got a new teacher - she was only bothered with people getting C grades (she even tried to get the whole class to sit a Intermediate paper where the top mark is a B and this was the top set! :eek: ). She refused to help people who would definetly get at least a C to obtain a higher grade and didn't even finish teching us all the material - the result was that I ended up with 2 Cs in maths (the other C being in stats) when my deputy head was thinking I should have gotten an A or even A*! :eek: Personaly I think its crinimal how she helped people who didn't want to learn (it wasn't that they just didn't have the talent) and refused help to those who did want to learn. :mad:
    I had that in a lot of classes. Maths was awful for me, my mum had rung up so many times, talking to my teacher, my head of year, the head of maths and the deputy head but still nothing was done about the teadher, as a result he didn't teach me any maths for 3 years. In my GCSEs I got an A in maths and an A in stats (which I taught completely to myself with a little help from the nice people on here )

    I've never felt really stretched at my school, but I'm sure that happens to a lot of people. In year 8 I had a brilliant maths teacher who unlike all the other teachers who'd just leave me sitting there being bored with the work in one lesson he actually went out of his way to explain more complicated stuff to the more able kids in the class (about 4/5). When he did this one of the other kids put up her hand and said 'sir, it's not fair you're only teacher them, we're bored' and the teacher replied 'now you know what it's like for them, they have that every lesson'. Unfortunately he left.

    It must be hard for teachers because they get a class of 30 kids all with different abilities and more than half of them don't want to learn. The teacher ends up trying to control the class and teaching to the average standard.

    Most of the time you just end up teaching yourself stuff.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    People with no qualifications etc.
    etc.?
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    (Original post by me!)


    Most of the time you just end up teaching yourself stuff.
    I think that is where I went wrong with my GCSEs apart from a bit of revision I didn't learn how to pass the exams, we were taught the subject. Looking back I should have done what I did with my AVCE and learn exactly what the examing boards are looking for.
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    (Original post by Bigcnee)
    etc.?
    People who drop out of school, live off the dole, spend all day in the pub, get involved with a bit of petty crime etc. That is what uneducated is to me because these people don't know any better.

    I am not saying all people who have no qualifications turn to crime but there is a clear link between formal education and crime.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I think that is where I went wrong with my GCSEs apart from a bit of revision I didn't learn how to pass the exams, we were taught the subject. Looking back I should have done what I did with my AVCE and learn exactly what the examing boards are looking for.
    How do you mean learn to pass the exam? Oh ok I get ya! TBH I would have been lost without this place and all the hints and tips I got from here, like to download the syllabus and look to see what I'd need to know in the exam and just going reading through reading revision guides.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    People who drop out of school, live off the dole, spend all day in the pub, get involved with a bit of petty crime etc. That is what uneducated is to me because these people don't know any better.

    I am not saying all people who have no qualifications turn to crime but there is a clear link between formal education and crime.
    I think that the only link is their parenting and that it is not a direct link to education. If I look at my school the people who are petty criminals have not had a good upbringing and they are not encouraged in their education or anything that they do.


    I think the only reason they turn to crime is because they haven't been supported through their education and so don't have qualifications to get a job. They are not encouraged to go to the local college and take more vocational subjects that they could do well in.

    It is the lack of help, support and guidance at home. Its not that they don't know better I think its the fact that they have never been encouraged to do something so don't have a great deal of confidence or self satisfaction in their achievements.

    I don't want to generalise across the board but I do think that from people who I know that this does play a significant factor.
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    I think that no matter what the education system (be it comprehensive, grammar, or public school) the top 1% or less, ie the exceptional will always come through whatever the situation. That said, the majority of people will rely heavily on the teachers or environment to reach their full potential and some of these people do not reach their full potential because of their education ( or lack of), and they end up in low paid jobs etc because of this. From a personal point of view this is really unfair, however from a society point of view this is how it is, not everyone who deserves a £30,000 job will get one, therefore some inevitably become luckier than others.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    People who drop out of school, live off the dole, spend all day in the pub, get involved with a bit of petty crime etc. That is what uneducated is to me because these people don't know any better.

    I am not saying all people who have no qualifications turn to crime but there is a clear link between formal education and crime.
    Yep...white collar crime!
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I am not saying all people who have no qualifications turn to crime but there is a clear link between formal education and crime.
    Maybe you should count yourself luck for not being born into poverty?
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    (Original post by Bigcnee)
    Maybe you should count yourself luck for not being born into poverty?
    I do I never said I didn't.
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    (Original post by Bigcnee)
    Maybe you should count yourself luck for not being born into poverty?
    Or even lucky.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Or even lucky.
    I meant: luck personified.
 
 
 
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