Mizbiz1
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On the training course me and my friend are on, you work in a school full time for two years (as well as doing training sessions and CPD) and get awarded QTS at the end. It is all funded by the school and going fine. There is an option to pay money to a uni and get PGCE, but it costs £1800 pounds. is that worth it or do i just need QTS? the company told me all you need in England is QTS, but then why do people do PGCE?
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username2981082
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(Original post by Mizbiz1)
On the training course me and my friend are on, you work in a school full time for two years (as well as doing training sessions and CPD) and get awarded QTS at the end. It is all funded by the school and going fine. There is an option to pay money to a uni and get PGCE, but it costs £1800 pounds. is that worth it or do i just need QTS? the company told me all you need in England is QTS, but then why do people do PGCE?
While it is true that QTS is only required in England, a lot of people may not plan to stay in England. PGCE allows you to teach in all parts of the United Kingdom as well as abroad. With QTS you are only limited to teaching in England and Wales. Also, teachers with a PGCE are highly desired by employers. A PGCE is technically a masters qualification. What school wouldn't want teachers that have more qualifications?

That said, if you do a good interview and application you won't be at a tremendous disadvantage to teachers with a PGCE.

If you don't mind being only able to teach in England then it is fine to not do a PGCE. However, if you want to be able to teach anywhere in the UK as well as internationally then a PGCE is a requirement.
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Mizbiz1
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(Original post by constantine2016)
While it is true that QTS is only required in England, a lot of people may not plan to stay in England. PGCE allows you to teach in all parts of the United Kingdom as well as abroad. With QTS you are only limited to teaching in England and Wales. Also, teachers with a PGCE are highly desired by employers. A PGCE is technically a masters qualification. What school wouldn't want teachers that have more qualifications?

That said, if you do a good interview and application you won't be at a tremendous disadvantage to teachers with a PGCE.

If you don't mind being only able to teach in England then it is fine to not do a PGCE. However, if you want to be able to teach anywhere in the UK as well as internationally then a PGCE is a requirement.
ah okay. Thanks!
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LostRiot
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(Original post by constantine2016)
A PGCE is technically a masters qualification.
What!? No it isn't, I've heard numerous teachers say this, and I can tell you, it is absolutely not a masters.

Proof of this is the fact that most PGCE courses count as 120 credits at masters level. A masters is 180 credits. i.e. PGCE is part of a masters, but not a full one.

I have a PGCE, I chose to do it as I wanted to have the freedom to teach outside the UK. But that said I've met a lot of outstanding teachers in senior management positions who do not have one. PGCE is a nice thing to have, but it doesn't really give you anything if you don't want to leave England and Wales.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by LostRiot)
What!? No it isn't, I've heard numerous teachers say this, and I can tell you, it is absolutely not a masters.
It is a masters level qualification but not a full masters. Mine (just finished) is worth a third of a masters. A masters if you have a PGCE is both shorter and cheaper. But a PGCE is a master level qualification.


To the OP - do a PGCE. It is a pain, but the teaching establishment seem to value academic qualifications so it can only help progress your career in education.
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Angelil
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Normally under EU law, EU countries should accept QTS as equivalent to their national teaching qualifications (even if you need to obtain paperwork in those countries stating that your qualifications are equivalent).

As Britain is not scheduled to leave the EU until 2019, normally you should be fine with QTS within those countries.

I have heard stories of people with PGCEs not having their qualifications accepted in the EU - so it is certainly not as straightforward as some people on this thread are portraying it to be.

I would not pay £1800 to a uni just to get the bit of paper saying you have 'done' the PGCE if you won't have actually benefited from anything a PGCE offers you.
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mem94
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If you can get QTS through what you are doing I would say stick to that. I personally a feel a PGCE is just often regarded as higher when applying for jobs and such.
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Annmarq
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Hi after reading the above I am a little confused. Ok I have passed both qts tests was due to start a Bed in primary education but unfortunately didn't achieve my GCSE Science retake so am doing a BA in educational studies for 3 years with looking to do a PGCE at the end for a year is this the best thing to Do?
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computed
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(Original post by Annmarq)
Hi after reading the above I am a little confused. Ok I have passed both qts tests was due to start a Bed in primary education but unfortunately didn't achieve my GCSE Science retake so am doing a BA in educational studies for 3 years with looking to do a PGCE at the end for a year is this the best thing to Do?
Did the university say they will not accept your fail? Are they aware of your retake result?

If you are happy to go that route, by all means, go for it. I don't see anything wrong with it, though it will seem quite long I should imagine!
Don't forget that your skills test results are valid indefinitely, so at least you'll be able to get on a PGCE more quickly.

Also, have you considered going for PGCE Secondary? You don't need a GCSE in science to enrol onto one, and you'll save yourself 3 years. You may still be able to apply for secondary this year, otherwise it will have to be in 2018.
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Annmarq
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Yes I had a telephone conversation with someone there today it's so disappointing the requirements were btec DMM and I got D*D*D* English maths science C I got a C in science exam but the course work brought it down to a D I am so disappointed but they are adamant I need the science even tho my Btec had a science section.
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arsenalworks
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(Original post by Annmarq)
Yes I had a telephone conversation with someone there today it's so disappointing the requirements were btec DMM and I got D*D*D* English maths science C I got a C in science exam but the course work brought it down to a D I am so disappointed but they are adamant I need the science even tho my Btec had a science section.
I was going to suggest the same as @computed. Considered secondary?
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Annmarq
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If I do the secondary is there a course I could take after for primary?
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computed
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(Original post by Annmarq)
If I do the secondary is there a course I could take after for primary?
If you want to work in primary, you should train for it. However, as a secondary teacher, you are also qualified to teach in primary.
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