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    Your options only matters if the subject you are doing in university requires them, otherwise its fine.

    For example, you cant do english lit, psychology and religious studies but then go and do computer science at university.
    It wont work like that because CompSci would require alot of mathematics. So if you swapped maths for one of those, then it would be fine.

    First see the course, ensure you've met the minimum, if its requires a certain subject. Then choose others that you will enjoy.
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    Personally, I think your combination of chosen subjects is weak, as there isn't one academically robust option amongst them. But perhaps that doesn't matter, if your objective is to gain the highest marks possible to access a less demanded course. Tough love and all that.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    No they don't say that at all. Have you READ the document you linked to?

    "You don’t necessarily need to have studied three facilitating subjects at A-level. Some courses require one or two facilitating subjects, whilst for other courses there are no specific subject requirements. If you don’t know what you want to study then it’s a really good rule of thumb that taking two facilitating subjects will keep a wide range of degree courses open to you. "

    That's nothing like saying you SHOULD take 2 facilitating subjects, it's saying if you're not sure and want to keep your options open then taking 2 isn't a bad idea. There's students every year who take 3 facilitating subjects and then realise they aren't the right subjects for the degree they want to study.
    Notice how I said SHOULD and not MUST?

    Rule of thumb
    noun rule that it is wise to follow


    I interpret a rule of thumb as a should, and so has every other teacher and careers advisers I have spoken to since discussing the concept of applying to university since Year 9. If they are all wrong then they all ought to take early retirement.
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    Notice how I said SHOULD and not MUST?

    Rule of thumb
    noun rule that it is wise to follow


    I interpret a rule of thumb as a should, and so has every other teacher and careers advisers I have spoken to since discussing the concept of applying to university since Year 9.
    Speaking as someone who worked in admissions in a russell group university for over a decade (and who helped draft the document you linked to)....you've misinterpreted.

    It's a rule of thumb for people who have literally no idea what they want to study at university - in that case it's good advice (unless the student concerned loathes all the facilitating subjects or finds them all incredibly difficult to do well in).

    For someone like the OP who has a few routes in mind it's completely irrelevent.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Speaking as someone who worked in admissions in a russell group university for over a decade (and who helped draft the document you linked to)....you've misinterpreted.

    It's a rule of thumb for people who have literally no idea what they want to study at university - in that case it's good advice (unless the student concerned loathes all the facilitating subjects or finds them all incredibly difficult to do well in).

    For someone like the OP who has a few routes in mind it's completely irrelevent.
    In which case I bow to your greater knowledge. Do you find it common that teachers force/advise two facilitating subjects on all students? I can't believe that's what I have always been told by senior members of staff it is so clearing wrong.
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    (Original post by Blue_Cow)
    In which case I bow to your greater knowledge. Do you find it common that teachers force/advise two facilitating subjects on all students? I can't believe that's what I have always been told by senior members of staff it is so clearing wrong.
    I can understand why schools and teachers do it - it's easier to have a strict rule and stick to it than actually do the research for every individual student and be accused of unfairness. And if someone genuinely has no idea what to study at university (and quite likes the facilitating subjects concerned) then it's a good way to keep options open.

    It's not the only thing teachers are often out of the loop on https://www.tes.com/news/school-news...-ucas-personal
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    (Original post by zoe.biscuit)
    I've checked the russell group website and it's different and way more respected, but kinda seems a little easier? I think unis like to see it on applications unlike general studies
    It seems like what would happen if you meshed EPQ and general studies together
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    (Original post by zoe.biscuit)
    Hey

    So starting sept 2017, i'm taking psychology, sociology, english language and pre-u global perspectives because my school makes you choose from a list of extra options.

    Are there many people taking fourth options or is it mainly three now? And more importantly, do i need a facilitating subject?

    So if i change language to lang/lit is that a facilitating subject? And is global perspectives respected?

    Going into journalism/psychology/an english route if that helps. Thanks!
    Hi Zoe,

    To be frank with you, psychology and sociology together is a poor choice, both (especially sociology) are soft humanities, with a low academic acknowledgement. Sociology shouldn't even exist, it's a laughing stock. Try replace sociology with history if you are bent towards humanities?

    English language is okay, however literature is a stronger subject at A-Level and some of the texts you read are amazing.

    If you feel you are up to it, pick a facilitating subject, but generally university's don't care that much for them. A-Levels are tough work, so only take one if you are sure.

    My last tip is if you can do business, law or economics at your school seriously consider them. After university, if that's the route you decide to take, it is very competitive. These will be very useful to you if you have them.

    I wish you all the best, pick wisely!
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    (Original post by maximo65)
    Hi Zoe,

    To be frank with you, psychology and sociology together is a poor choice, both (especially sociology) are soft humanities, with a low academic acknowledgement. Sociology shouldn't even exist, it's a laughing stock. Try replace sociology with history if you are bent towards humanities?

    English language is okay, however literature is a stronger subject at A-Level and some of the texts you read are amazing.

    If you feel you are up to it, pick a facilitating subject, but generally university's don't care that much for them. A-Levels are tough work, so only take one if you are sure.

    My last tip is if you can do business, law or economics at your school seriously consider them. After university, if that's the route you decide to take, it is very competitive. These will be very useful to you if you have them.

    I wish you all the best, pick wisely!
    Sociology and Psychology are both on the LSE preferred academic subjects list http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...y-Requirements
    And UCLs https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...level-subjects
    And Sheffield's: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/undergra...olicies/alevel

    The "worst" any university has to say is from Cambridge who say they are "useful preparation for some of our arts and social science courses" (so the sorts of subjects the OP has expressed an interest in) http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/files/und...ct-matters.pdf
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Sociology and Psychology are both on the LSE preferred academic subjects list http://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Un...y-Requirements
    And UCLs https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...level-subjects
    And Sheffield's: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/undergra...olicies/alevel

    The "worst" any university has to say is from Cambridge who say they are "useful preparation for some of our arts and social science courses" (so the sorts of subjects the OP has expressed an interest in) http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/files/und...ct-matters.pdf
    They are joke subjects though, not respected by any serious academic.
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    (Original post by maximo65)
    They are joke subjects though, not respected by any serious academic.
    I will believe actual academics who've told me the opposite over an A level student thanks
 
 
 
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