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Questions to ask in job interview Watch

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  • View Poll Results: Is "is there anything I can do to strengthen my application?" A good question to ask?
    Yes it shows you're keen on the role
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    No it makes the interviewers feel awkward
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    I have a friend who always asks "is there anything I can do right now to strengthen my application?" But is this a good question to ask for wil it just make the interviewers feel awkward?
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    I've never asked this question in an interview before and I tend to avoid asking risky questions like that. Perhaps the wording of it may imply that you're not qualified/experienced/confident enough for the role.

    A good alternative can be "What do you think are the most important qualities for someone to excel in this role?". Ask about the company, what the interviewer likes about the company, the culture, etc... These are a lot safer and don't put pressure on the interviewer.
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    (Original post by UWS)
    I've never asked this question in an interview before and I tend to avoid asking risky questions like that. Perhaps the wording of it may imply that you're not qualified/experienced/confident enough for the role.

    A good alternative can be "What do you think are the most important qualities for someone to excel in this role?". Ask about the company, what the interviewer likes about the company, the culture, etc... These are a lot safer and don't put pressure on the interviewer.
    True. I also feel that it's important to ask something like "what do you think is one thing that could be improved about the company?" Because no company is perfect and I think it's questions like this which will give you a bit of an insight into the company culture, although it may put the interviewer in an uncomfortable position.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    True. I also feel that it's important to ask something like "what do you think is one thing that could be improved about the company?" Because no company is perfect and I think it's questions like this which will give you a bit of an insight into the company culture, although it may put the interviewer in an uncomfortable position.
    It's opinion based and is also a bit risky.

    Check out this link for some good questions to ask.
    https://biginterview.com/blog/2011/0...interview.html
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    (Original post by UWS)
    It's opinion based and is also a bit risky.

    Check out this link for some good questions to ask.
    https://biginterview.com/blog/2011/0...interview.html
    Risky maybe but I personally think interviews should be 2 way things. I know some companies make interviews quite informal and more like a conversation. So whilst the interviewers do ask the questions they need to ask, it also gives the interviewee the chance to converse with and learn more about the company. If all you're doing is answering their questions and asking risk free questions at the end all with the aim of maximising your chances of getting the job, you could be walking into a job you won't fit well with whether that's the company culture or what the hiring manager envisions for the role. So I feel, the interviewee, whilst selling themselves well should also try and find out s bit about the company from the interviewers perspective. If you've sold yourself well, I think a good interviewer should be keen to give you their opinions.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    Risky maybe but I personally think interviews should be 2 way things. I know some companies make interviews quite informal and more like a conversation. So whilst the interviewers do ask the questions they need to ask, it also gives the interviewee the chance to converse with and learn more about the company. If all you're doing is answering their questions and asking risk free questions at the end all with the aim of maximising your chances of getting the job, you could be walking into a job you won't fit well with whether that's the company culture or what the hiring manager envisions for the role. So I feel, the interviewee, whilst selling themselves well should also try and find out s bit about the company from the interviewers perspective. If you've sold yourself well, I think a good interviewer should be keen to give you their opinions.
    I would say see how the interview goes first before asking questions like that. You have to be comfortable with each other or it may be awkward. There was this one time I did bring up the company's recent acquisition of another company and what it meant for the company as a whole, of course I got on well with the interviewer so they gave me the honest answer (they had cut some jobs but I was unaffected). I got the offer but I didn't take it because I felt it wasn't going to be stable and I'd be searching for another job in a few months.
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    All of this is superficial bs honestly.
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    All of this is superficial bs honestly.
    Why?
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    Why?
    You have to pretend you give a f**k about the company. You have to make yourself seem as unnaturally confident (arrogant) as possible. It's all a joke.
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    (Original post by cbreef)
    You have to pretend you give a f**k about the company. You have to make yourself seem as unnaturally confident (arrogant) as possible. It's all a joke.
    That's if you actually don't give a f*** about the company. But maybe you do. I think an interviewer can see if it's genuine. Confidence is just something which is preferred in human nature in general. People would much rather be around a confident than not so confident person.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    That's if you actually don't give a f*** about the company. But maybe you do. I think an interviewer can see if it's genuine. Confidence is just something which is preferred in human nature in general. People would much rather be around a confident than not so confident person.
    You mean to tell me you respect these soulless conglomerates who only care about making as much money as possible?

    There's a difference between confidence and straight up arrogance.

    The whole process is fake and convoluted.
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    (Original post by cbreef)

    The whole process is fake and convoluted.
    Id tend to agree. But there are exceptions. Ive just been through the whole cycle and found that generally its as you say. However, certain companies or people stood out which in some cases made the process slightly more agreeable and less fake.
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    (Original post by josh_v)
    Id tend to agree. But there are exceptions. Ive just been through the whole cycle and found that generally its as you say. However, certain companies or people stood out which in some cases made the process slightly more agreeable and less fake.
    We need more businesses like that.
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    The other type of question which I find can be quite hard on what position to take is the situational judgement ones such as how would you deal with a difficult customer or how would you deal with a situation where a supplier wasn't fulfilling their contractual obligations etc? Because obviously the way to deal with it would be "firm but fair and diplomatic" but I find it's quite easy on these type of questions to either be too nice and lenient or too aggressive and hard line. So how do you find the balance?
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    "is there anything I can do right now to strengthen my application?"
    This is a poor question becaase the underlying presumption/admission is that you aren't yet ideal for the role. That's not the subject you want to invite an interview panel to think about and discuss at all, and certainly not in front of you before the enite interview process (of other candidates) is complete.

    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    "what do you think is one thing that could be improved about the company?" .
    This is just rude and presumptious from a interview candidate, why would you ask a company this? Would you ask a date 'what do you think is one thing that could be improved about your part in this relationship?"


    You should ask a question about the job and what you might be involved in eg

    Do you have any large projects that this role might be involved in in the first year?
    I read about the company's investment in X, do you think this will impact the team in the UK?
    This role seems to be split in two parts X and Y, do you think there are the same career progression opportunities in the company for both strands?
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    This is a poor question becaase the underlying presumption/admission is that you aren't yet ideal for the role. That's not the subject you want to invite an interview panel to think about and discuss at all, and certainly not in front of you before the enite interview process (of other candidates) is complete.


    This is just rude and presumptious from a interview candidate, why would you ask a company this? Would you ask a date 'what do you think is one thing that could be improved about your part in this relationship?"

    You should ask a question about the job and what you might be involved in eg

    Do you have any large projects that this role might be involved in in the first year?
    I read about the company's investment in X, do you think this will impact the team in the UK?
    This role seems to be split in two parts X and Y, do you think there are the same career progression opportunities in the company for both strands?
    So how would you find out what the culture is like? Interviews are a load of crap. It's just all fake. It's not at all a good indicator of how well someone will perform once in a job.

    Also dates are less one sided I think.
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    (Original post by Ybsy75)
    So how would you find out what the culture is like? Interviews are a load of crap. It's just all fake. It's not at all a good indicator of how well someone will perform once in a job.

    Also dates are less one sided I think.
    You can't find out what culture is really like in any organisation in one interview, one meeting, one day even one week. Culture is a longer term appreciation and anyway changes over time in organisations at a much more rapid way than it does in society. You shouldn't really be considering culture as a determining factor early in a career, get in anywhere, get experience, learn about a culture an dif it doesn't fit, move n after 2 years.

    If job interviews are so poor an indicator, then why to nearly all employers use them? Sure there are variations, but its basically always a written assessment of technical skills, a significant filter and then invite the best 4-6 to a 1 hour interview, perhaps with a short technical test. If it was really ineffective, employers would use another method.
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    (Original post by UWS)
    I've never asked this question in an interview before and I tend to avoid asking risky questions like that. Perhaps the wording of it may imply that you're not qualified/experienced/confident enough for the role.

    A good alternative can be "What do you think are the most important qualities for someone to excel in this role?". Ask about the company, what the interviewer likes about the company, the culture, etc... These are a lot safer and don't put pressure on the interviewer.
    I have never heard of anybody asking "what the interviewer likes about the company", that sounds a bit odd. They're the interviewer and you're the interviewee, asking that kind of question seems like you're interviewing them instead...

    To answer OP: I wouldn't ask for ways to strengthen your application. It sounds a bit desperate IMO. But as said above, asking for factual info about the company that you may not know already is a good idea as it shows interest

    In reality though, it's not like what you ask / answer is going to make a deal of difference in an interview. I'm a firm believer it's more on a) your availability b) your attitude/behaviour - do you "fit in" with their colleagues etc
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    Because there's no other way of doing it.
 
 
 
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